1050 words summary Business Finance Assignment Help

1050 words summary Business Finance Assignment Help. 1050 words summary Business Finance Assignment Help.


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The purpose of this assignment is to help you understand the basics of financial statement analysis related to the assets section of the balance sheet, data interpretation, and how financial information is obtained to understand how a company accounts for its long-lived assets.

Assignment Steps

Resources: Financial Accounting: Tools for Business Decision Making

Note: The financial statements of Apple, Inc. are presented in Appendix A of Financial Accounting. Instructions for accessing and using the company’s complete annual report, including the notes to the financial statements, are also provided in Appendix A.

Complete a 1,050-word summary of findings and recommendations from the following questions:

  • What were the total cost and book value of property, plant, and equipment at September 27, 2014?
  • Using the notes to find financial statements, what method or methods of depreciation are used by Apple for financial reporting purposes?
  • What was the amount of depreciation and amortization expense for each of the three years 2012-2014? (Hint: Use the statement of cash flows).
  • Using the statement of cash flows, what are the amounts of property, plant, and equipment purchased in 2014 and 2013?
  • Using the notes to the financial statements, explain in the summary how Apple accounted for its intangible assets in 2014.

Use the Week 2 Excel® spreadsheet to show your work and submit with your summary.

1050 words summary Business Finance Assignment Help[supanova_question]

Health Individual Project 2 Health Medical Assignment Help

Healing Hands Hospital is an acute care community hospital that serves a suburban community outside of a large city with two competing large academic medical centers. Both Healing Hands Hospital and the academic medical centers have a long history of service to the region, but their business and fundamental practices are different. Your manager, Ms. Woods, Healing Hands’ Chief Operating Officer, is part of the Task Force working on the strategic plan for the hospital and needs to understand the fundamental practices of these academic medical centers.

You have been asked to research the differences between the services that your organization offers and those of at least one of these academic medical centers. For the purposes of this assignment, use the Web to research community hospitals and academic medical centers and select one community hospital and one academic medical center located in the same city or area to represent these two healthcare organizations for the purpose of working on this assignment. You will use the information that you find about these two healthcare organizations for the Individual Project assignments in the remaining weeks of the course culminating in your final project in Week 5. Use the acute-care community hospital to represent Healing Hands Hospital. This link provides a list of example community hospitals. Choose one and then find an academic medical center located in the same geographic region. Review the Web information on these facilities to complete this assignment.

1. Describe the similarities and differences of these organizations in terms of the following:

  • Mission
  • Goals
  • Objectives
  • Management structure
  • Reimbursement models
  • Staffing
  • Policies
  • Procedures
  • Research and clinical trials

2. Based on your analysis of the data that you present, provide your opinion on what would be the main areas of concern if the two organizations were to merge and how they could be overcome.

You may include a table for the comparison data, but you must describe your evaluation of where there are and are not similarities between the two healthcare organizations and your opinion.

Be sure to document your references using APA format. This includes the websites for the two hospitals that you are using for the assignment.

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Contents of an Annual Report Business Finance Assignment Help

Discuss the following scenario: Staff members from the marketing department of your firm are doing a splendid job selling products to customers. Many of the customers are so pleased that they are also buying shares in the company’s stock, which means that they receive a copy of the firm’s annual report. Unfortunately, questions sometimes arise that the marketing staff members are woefully inadequate at answering. Technical questions about the firm’s financial condition and performance are referred to the chief financial officer, but the director of marketing has asked you to write a memo in which you explain the key elements in an annual report so that marketing representatives are better prepared to respond to questions of a more general nature.

For your initial post, write a clear, concise memo (no more than 250 words) that describes the contents of an annual report so marketing personnel can understand the basic requirements of an annual report. Reference this week’s readings and lecture to help organize and explain your thoughts. In addition, answer the following questions:

  • Do you think all marketing staff members should be equipped to speak with the public about the firm’s financial matters?
  • What are some of the benefits of improving employee financial literacy?

What are Financial Statements and How can we use them?

Financial statements are used by managers and executives for various purposes beyond improving the financial performance of a company. Financial statements give a clear picture of how the company has been faring over a specified period of time, which managers use to identify trends and make informed decisions on how to improve a company’s performance (Thomson, 2013). Usually, managers can use two sorts of financial reports, namely:

  1. External financial reports prepared and availed to various members of the general public, such as bankers, investors, suppliers and vendors. They should be prepared in accordance to laid-down accounting guidelines and should be filed with the Securities Exchange Commission.
  2. Internal financial statements, on the other hand, are prepared and confidentially used internally by managers.

The commonly used sections of financial statements include the balance sheet, which shows the financial position of an organization, and the income statement, which has the purpose of providing an organization’s revenues and expenses. The cash flow statement depicts the amount of cash flowing into and out of the business. For the incorporated business organizations, a statement of shareholders’ equity is included in the company’s annual and it details owner’s claim on the company’s assets.

Internal reports, unlike external ones, are accessible only by particular employees because of their confidential nature. These reports contain what is private to the company, such as cost of goods purchased, product sales, and customer summary, which cannot be availed to competitors. Since internal reports are used internally, they do not have to follow strict rules (Thomson, 2013).

Company financial statements are read by various people for various reasons, among them are:

  • To determine the financial status of a company, and
  • To make decisions on how to improve a company’s performance

Users of financial reports therefore include managers and executives, employees, creditors, vendors, investors, government agencies, competitors, analysts, and financial reporters, all using them for different purposes. Unlike public companies that have to trade their stocks in open markets, private companies do not disclose much of their financial performance information to the public. This helps them take advantage of three benefits: confidentiality, increased flexibility, and greater financial freedom. However, such companies are not able to raise additional cash since they are restricted on issuing stock. Financial reports can be found in such places as SEC’s Electronic Data Gathering, Analysis, and Retrieved, companies’ websites, and financial news websites.

Annual reports have to be presented to shareholders prior to annual meetings, as required by the Securities Act of 1933. As a requirement, companies should post annual reports in addition to proxy materials and other issues which have to be voted on at the meeting. An annual report includes various sections, although it does not follow a fixed format. The following sections are mostly found in an annual report:

  • Highlights
  • Letter from the President or CEO
  • Auditors’ Report
  • Management’s Discussion and Analysis (MD&A)
  • Management’s Discussion of Financial Responsibility
  • Financial Statements
  • Notes to the Financial Statements
  • Other Information

A Form 10-K is presented to the SEC and serves the purpose of providing comprehensive details on the company and its financial position. Usually, the Form 10-K is composed of four key parts: business operations, directors and executives information, financial data, and additional audits. All companies’ financial statements must conform to the GAAPS, a collection of principles applied to ensure that financial statements are accurate and fair.

Forbes School of Business Faculty

Reference:

Thomson, J. (2013). Mind the GAAP: Why private companies should embrace one reporting standard. Forbes. Retrieved from http://www.forbes.com/sites/jeffthomson/2013/04/30…

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Database: Demographic Information (bshs/375) Humanities Assignment Help

Resources: Database Template, Spreadsheet Guide on Excel®, and Lynda.com® Tutorials

Use the raw data in the
Database Template to build on this assignment over the next 4 weeks
using this single document. The final product will be submitted in Week
5.

Note: The Database Template has
two worksheets. Access each using the tabs at the bottom of the
template. You will also add new tabs in Weeks 4 & 5. Each week’s tab
should be contained in a single worksheet.

Using the Demographic worksheet in the Database Template, do the following:

  • Create an automatic sort by applying a filter to each column so your data can be viewed in different ways.
  • Format the Demographic worksheet so it can be printed in landscape format and on a single page.
  • Create a header in the header field labeled “Database.”
  • Add cell borders around each cell.

Click the Assignment Files tab to submit your assignment.

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Health Individual Project 1 Health Medical Assignment Help

Read the scenario that you will use for the Individual Projects in each week of the course. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has taken on a more visible role in health care delivery. Many changes have transpired to improve patient safety along with the implementation of additional quality metrics, and these changes impact reimbursement rates.

Likewise, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act has changed the reimbursement fee structure of Medicare and Medicaid reimbursement for health care services. Other legislation including the HITECH Act and the Medicare Authorization and CHIP Reactivation Act of 2015 (MACRA) all impact how healthcare organizations receive reimbursement and demonstrate use of data to improve quality and delivery of patient care.

Mr. Magone, CEO of Healing Hands Hospital, has asked you to join the “Future of Healing Hands” Task Force, and your first assignment is to work with the Hospital Chief Financial Officer, Mr. Johnson, and provide a summary of the current regulations regarding Medicare reimbursement including how MACRA will impact reimbursement if/when Healing Hands coordinates delivery of services by affiliating with physician practices.

For this assignment, write a 2-3 page report that you will deliver to Mr. Magone on how the new CMS initiatives and regulations will impact the organization’s revenue structure. In your presentation, address the following questions:

  • Why did CMS become more involved in the reimbursement component of health care? How does CMS’s involvement impact the reimbursement model for Healing Hands Hospital and other health care organizations? If CMS reimbursement regulations for Medicare and Medicaid change, does it follow that other insurance providers change their policies on reimbursement?
  • What tools can be implemented to ensure organizations such as Healing Hands Hospital and physician practices are meeting the policies and procedures set forth by CMS?
  • Identify 3 tools from the CMS Web site that are helpful in meeting the requirements for Medicare reimbursement set forth by CMS.

Be sure to include reference sources using APA formatting.


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Class discussion two Humanities Assignment Help

Prior to beginning work on this discussion, read the Grenyer & Lewis (2012) “Prevalence, Prediction, and Prevention of Psychologist Misconduct” article and the APA Practice Central’s Professional Health and Well-being for Psychologists, Tips from Practitioners on Finding Work-Life Balance, and Tips for Self-Care online articles.

Select two complaints presented in the Grenyer & Lewis article (see Table 1) and explain the ramifications of these violations applying the APA’s Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct to each situation. Assess the role of the APA in assisting psychology professionals in the identification of potential areas of misconduct. Describe and recommend a course of action to avoid these areas. Evaluate the contemporary role of psychology professionals and elaborate on the relationship between self-care and the issue of maintaining ethical principles and professional standards. Identify one or two self-care tips, tools, or suggested courses of action provided on the APA’s Self-care resources for psychologistswebsite that might address the issues which lead to the chosen complaints

Class discussion two Humanities Assignment Help[supanova_question]

Accounting Errors Business Finance Assignment Help

In this assignment, you will assume the role of a business owner inquiring about the billing practices of a vendor.

You just received a bill for 16 hours of storage services and 8 hours of coding services from a vendor. You were charged $75 for both types of services. You had agreed on a price of $40 per hour for storage services and $75 per hour for coding services.

You do not want to pay this bill until the problem is rectified; in fact, you already put down a $600 payment, which isn’t reflected on the invoice at all.

*Your assignment is to write a professional business letter to the vendor inquiring about the bill and the vendor’s billing practices .1=page

*After the letter, please write a short summary of internal control practices that should be in place for the vendor to avoid this type of accounting error. Make sure to discuss how this error could be avoided in the future. Also, please comment on the internal control procedures in place at your company to detect this error. = paragraph

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Challenges Faced in Cash Flow Statement Preparation Business Finance Assignment Help

Review the available materials for the chapters covered this week, including the lecture, reading, publisher materials, demonstration problems and exercises at the end of the chapters. After reviewing these materials and attempting the assignment for the week, what challenges did you face? Do you have any questions on the material? . Horngren’s Accounting, The Financial Chapters
Read chapter 16.http://gcumedia.com/digital-resources/pearson/2013/horngrens-accounting-the-financial-chapters-with-myaccountinglab_ebook_10e.php The Statement of Cash Flows

Introduction

Generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) typically evolves in practice, rather than being written and then followed. An example of this evolution is the financial statement called, the statement of cash flows. Managers and business owners often asked why their companies were profitable, but did not have available cash, or had plenty of cash, but were operating at a loss. In response to this need, accountants developed the statement of cash flows to explain how cash was provided to the company or used by the company. The statement of cash flows is now a required financial statement according to GAAP. Since the statement of cash flows was developed long after the other three statements−the balance sheet, income statement, and statement of stockholders’ equity−it does not follow the same flow as the other statements and requires information from all of the other statements, as well as additional information, in order to be compiled. The statement of cash flows is useful because it shows an organization’s ability to produce future cash flows, provides an indication that the organization can meet its obligations, reports the differences between net income and net cash flows, and identifies the cash and noncash investing and financing activities during the period.

Internal Control Structure

In recent years, there has been great focus on the internal control system of an entity. The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 mandated that the system of internal control for all publicly traded companies be adequate in the prevention or detection of errors or irregularities in financial reporting and that corporate executives and boards of directors are responsible for these systems of internal control (Kimmel, Weygandt, & Kieso, 2009). The internal control structure is the system of all related methods and measures adopted within an organization to “safeguard its assets, increase efficiency of operations, and ensure compliance with laws and regulations” (Kimmel et al., pp. 327-328). The six basic principles of internal control activities are:

Establishment of responsibility

Segregation of duties

Documentation procedures

Physical controls

Independent internal verification

Human resource controls (Kimmel et al.)

Many of the internal control procedures of a company focus upon cash.

Cash and Cash Equivalents

Cash is the most liquid of all assets, and it is the most susceptible to fraudulent activity. In order to protect cash, management must have a strong internal control structure in place, including provisions that physically safeguard cash, procedures that limit employee access to cash, and measures to ensure accuracy in reporting. Holding money in a bank account and using a petty cash system for cash-on-hand will help to protect cash from theft and misuse. Cash management is critically important to decision makers that must have cash available to meet current needs, yet must avoid excess amounts of idle cash that produce no revenue. Analysis of cash is a key factor for potential creditors in decision making.

Cash equivalents are “short-term, highly liquid investments that are both (a) readily convertible to known amounts of cash, and (b) so near their maturity that they present insignificant risk of changes in interest rates” (Kieso, Weygandt, & Warfield, 2010, pp. 320-321). Cash equivalents usually have original maturity dates of three months or fewer. Examples of cash equivalents are treasury bills, commercial paper, and money market funds (Kieso et al., 2010). Cash equivalents are often shown with cash in a classification called cash and cash equivalents on the balance sheet.

Usefulness of the Statement of Cash Flows

Profitable operations do not always ensure positive cash flow. While net income is important, cash flow is also critical to a company’s success. Cash flow permits a company to expand operations, replace worn assets, take advantage of new investment opportunities, and pay dividends to its owners. Both managers and analysts need to understand the various sources and uses of cash that are associated with business activities.

The cash flow statement focuses attention on a firm’s ability to generate cash internally, its management of current assets and current liabilities, and the details of its investments and its external financing (Libby, Libby, & Short, 2004). It is designed to help both managers and analysts answer important cash-related questions such as these:

Will the company have enough cash to pay its short-term debts to suppliers and other creditors without additional borrowing?

Is the company adequately managing its accounts receivable and inventory?

Has the company made necessary investments in new productive capacity?

Did the company generate enough cash flow internally to finance necessary investment or did it rely on external financing?

Is the company changing the makeup of its external financing?

These questions and others can be answered through the preparation and examination of the statement of cash flows.

Operating, Investing, and Financing Activities

The statement has three main sections: (a) cash flows from operating activities, which are related to income from normal, recurring operations; (b) cash flows from investing activities, which are related to the acquisition and sale of productive assets; and (c) cash flows from financing activities, which are related to external financing of the enterprise. The net cash inflow or outflow for the year is the same amount as the increase or decrease in cash and cash equivalents for the year on the balance sheet. Cash equivalents are highly liquid investments with original maturities of less than three months. The operating activities section of the statement of cash flows can be prepared using direct or indirect methods; the investing and financing activities sections always are prepared directly.

Direct Method of Determining Cash Flows from Operating Activities

The direct method for reporting cash flows from operating activities accumulates all of the operating transactions that result in either a debit or credit to cash into categories of cash inflows and cash outflows. The most common inflows are cash received from customers and dividends as well as interest on investments. The most common outflows are cash paid for the purchase of services and goods for resale, salaries and wages, income taxes, and interest on liabilities. The statement of cash flows from operating activities is prepared by adjusting each item on the income statement from an accrual basis to a cash basis.

Indirect Method of Determining Cash Flows from Operating Activities

The indirect method for reporting cash flows from operating activities includes a conversion of net income to net cash flow from operating activities. The conversion involves additions and subtractions for:

1.Noncurrent accruals, including expenses (such as depreciation expense) and revenues that do not affect current assets or current liabilities.

2.Changes in each of the individual current assets (other than cash and short-term investments) and current liabilities (other than short-term debt to financial institutions and current maturities of long-term debt that relates to financing), which reflect differences in the timing of accrual-basis net income and cash flows.

Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) Statement No. 95 requires that when the indirect method is used, additional disclosures must be made, such as the interest and income taxes paid by the company, so that the user of the financial statements may approximate the direct method of determining cash flows from operating activities (Kieso et al., 2010).

Cash Flows from Investing Activities

Investing activities reported on the cash flow statement include cash payments to acquire fixed assets and short- and long-term investments and cash proceeds from the sale of fixed assets and short- and long-term investments.

Cash Flows from Financing Activities

Cash inflows from financing activities include cash proceeds from the issuance of short- and long-term debt and common stock. Cash outflows include cash principal payments on short- and long-term debt, cash paid for the repurchase of the company’s stock, and cash dividend payments. Cash payments associated with interest are a cash flow from operating activities.

Analysis of Cash Flow Ratios

Cash flow ratios are highly scrutinized by present and potential creditors. The statement of cash flows, in conjunction with ratio analysis, can indicate whether a borrower will be able to repay funds if borrowed. The following ratios are typically used by present and potential creditors in analyzing cash flow potential.

Free cash flow — (cash flow from operating activities − capital expenditures − cash dividends) measures the cash remaining from operations after the company makes investments in new assets and pays out the expected dividends to stockholders (Kimmel et al., 2009). Free cash flow gives the analyst a better idea of how much cash truly is available from cash flows from operations than looking at the statement of cash flows alone.

Quality of income ratio — (cash flow from operating activities ÷ net income) measures the portion of income that was generated in cash. A higher quality of income ratio indicates greater ability to finance operating and other cash needs from operating cash inflows. A higher ratio also indicates that it is less likely that the company is using aggressive revenue recognition policies to increase net income.

Capital acquisition ratio — (cash flow from operating activities ÷ cash paid for property, plant, and equipment) reflects the portion of purchases of property, plant, and equipment financed from operating activities without the need for outside debt or equity financing or the sale of other investments or fixed assets. A high ratio benefits the company because it provides the company with opportunities for strategic acquisitions (Libby et al., 2004).

Impact of Additional Cash Flow Disclosures

Noncash investing and financing activities are investing and financing activities that do not involve cash. They include, for example, purchases of fixed assets with long-term debt or stock, exchanges of fixed assets, and exchanges of debt for stock. These transactions are disclosed only as supplemental disclosures to the cash flow statement along with cash paid for taxes and interest under the indirect method.

Conclusion

The statement of cash flows is considered by many to be the most important of the financial statements in indicating a company’s ability to remain a going concern. Although a company’s mission, product, distribution chain, corporate culture, and marketing strategy are all key elements of a successful business, a company cannot survive in the short term without available cash. To employ workers, replenish inventory, and foster growth, a company must have sufficient cash available to pay for its current operating expenses, meet maturing long-term debt obligations, and supply working capital for opportunities that arise. There must exist a balance between having enough cash on hand to meet needs and keeping funds invested in the assets of a business. The statement of cash flows aids users in analyzing whether or not a company is successful in achieving this balance.

References

Kieso, D. E., Weygandt, J. J., & Warfield, T. D. (2010). Intermediate accounting (13th ed.). Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons.

Kimmel, P. D., Weygandt, J. J., & Kieso, D. E. (2009). Accounting: Tools for business decision making (3rd ed.). Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Libby, R., Libby, P., & Short, D. (2004). Financial accounting (4th ed.). Boston: McGraw-Hill/Irwin

The Statement of Cash Flows

Introduction

Generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) typically evolves in practice, rather than being written and then followed. An example of this evolution is the financial statement called, the statement of cash flows. Managers and business owners often asked why their companies were profitable, but did not have available cash, or had plenty of cash, but were operating at a loss. In response to this need, accountants developed the statement of cash flows to explain how cash was provided to the company or used by the company. The statement of cash flows is now a required financial statement according to GAAP. Since the statement of cash flows was developed long after the other three statements−the balance sheet, income statement, and statement of stockholders’ equity−it does not follow the same flow as the other statements and requires information from all of the other statements, as well as additional information, in order to be compiled. The statement of cash flows is useful because it shows an organization’s ability to produce future cash flows, provides an indication that the organization can meet its obligations, reports the differences between net income and net cash flows, and identifies the cash and noncash investing and financing activities during the period.

Internal Control Structure

In recent years, there has been great focus on the internal control system of an entity. The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 mandated that the system of internal control for all publicly traded companies be adequate in the prevention or detection of errors or irregularities in financial reporting and that corporate executives and boards of directors are responsible for these systems of internal control (Kimmel, Weygandt, & Kieso, 2009). The internal control structure is the system of all related methods and measures adopted within an organization to “safeguard its assets, increase efficiency of operations, and ensure compliance with laws and regulations” (Kimmel et al., pp. 327-328). The six basic principles of internal control activities are:

Establishment of responsibility

Segregation of duties

Documentation procedures

Physical controls

Independent internal verification

Human resource controls (Kimmel et al.)

Many of the internal control procedures of a company focus upon cash.

Cash and Cash Equivalents

Cash is the most liquid of all assets, and it is the most susceptible to fraudulent activity. In order to protect cash, management must have a strong internal control structure in place, including provisions that physically safeguard cash, procedures that limit employee access to cash, and measures to ensure accuracy in reporting. Holding money in a bank account and using a petty cash system for cash-on-hand will help to protect cash from theft and misuse. Cash management is critically important to decision makers that must have cash available to meet current needs, yet must avoid excess amounts of idle cash that produce no revenue. Analysis of cash is a key factor for potential creditors in decision making.

Cash equivalents are “short-term, highly liquid investments that are both (a) readily convertible to known amounts of cash, and (b) so near their maturity that they present insignificant risk of changes in interest rates” (Kieso, Weygandt, & Warfield, 2010, pp. 320-321). Cash equivalents usually have original maturity dates of three months or fewer. Examples of cash equivalents are treasury bills, commercial paper, and money market funds (Kieso et al., 2010). Cash equivalents are often shown with cash in a classification called cash and cash equivalents on the balance sheet.

Usefulness of the Statement of Cash Flows

Profitable operations do not always ensure positive cash flow. While net income is important, cash flow is also critical to a company’s success. Cash flow permits a company to expand operations, replace worn assets, take advantage of new investment opportunities, and pay dividends to its owners. Both managers and analysts need to understand the various sources and uses of cash that are associated with business activities.

The cash flow statement focuses attention on a firm’s ability to generate cash internally, its management of current assets and current liabilities, and the details of its investments and its external financing (Libby, Libby, & Short, 2004). It is designed to help both managers and analysts answer important cash-related questions such as these:

Will the company have enough cash to pay its short-term debts to suppliers and other creditors without additional borrowing?

Is the company adequately managing its accounts receivable and inventory?

Has the company made necessary investments in new productive capacity?

Did the company generate enough cash flow internally to finance necessary investment or did it rely on external financing?

Is the company changing the makeup of its external financing?

These questions and others can be answered through the preparation and examination of the statement of cash flows.

Operating, Investing, and Financing Activities

The statement has three main sections: (a) cash flows from operating activities, which are related to income from normal, recurring operations; (b) cash flows from investing activities, which are related to the acquisition and sale of productive assets; and (c) cash flows from financing activities, which are related to external financing of the enterprise. The net cash inflow or outflow for the year is the same amount as the increase or decrease in cash and cash equivalents for the year on the balance sheet. Cash equivalents are highly liquid investments with original maturities of less than three months. The operating activities section of the statement of cash flows can be prepared using direct or indirect methods; the investing and financing activities sections always are prepared directly.

Direct Method of Determining Cash Flows from Operating Activities

The direct method for reporting cash flows from operating activities accumulates all of the operating transactions that result in either a debit or credit to cash into categories of cash inflows and cash outflows. The most common inflows are cash received from customers and dividends as well as interest on investments. The most common outflows are cash paid for the purchase of services and goods for resale, salaries and wages, income taxes, and interest on liabilities. The statement of cash flows from operating activities is prepared by adjusting each item on the income statement from an accrual basis to a cash basis.

Indirect Method of Determining Cash Flows from Operating Activities

The indirect method for reporting cash flows from operating activities includes a conversion of net income to net cash flow from operating activities. The conversion involves additions and subtractions for:

1.Noncurrent accruals, including expenses (such as depreciation expense) and revenues that do not affect current assets or current liabilities.

2.Changes in each of the individual current assets (other than cash and short-term investments) and current liabilities (other than short-term debt to financial institutions and current maturities of long-term debt that relates to financing), which reflect differences in the timing of accrual-basis net income and cash flows.

Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) Statement No. 95 requires that when the indirect method is used, additional disclosures must be made, such as the interest and income taxes paid by the company, so that the user of the financial statements may approximate the direct method of determining cash flows from operating activities (Kieso et al., 2010).

Cash Flows from Investing Activities

Investing activities reported on the cash flow statement include cash payments to acquire fixed assets and short- and long-term investments and cash proceeds from the sale of fixed assets and short- and long-term investments.

Cash Flows from Financing Activities

Cash inflows from financing activities include cash proceeds from the issuance of short- and long-term debt and common stock. Cash outflows include cash principal payments on short- and long-term debt, cash paid for the repurchase of the company’s stock, and cash dividend payments. Cash payments associated with interest are a cash flow from operating activities.

Analysis of Cash Flow Ratios

Cash flow ratios are highly scrutinized by present and potential creditors. The statement of cash flows, in conjunction with ratio analysis, can indicate whether a borrower will be able to repay funds if borrowed. The following ratios are typically used by present and potential creditors in analyzing cash flow potential.

Free cash flow — (cash flow from operating activities − capital expenditures − cash dividends) measures the cash remaining from operations after the company makes investments in new assets and pays out the expected dividends to stockholders (Kimmel et al., 2009). Free cash flow gives the analyst a better idea of how much cash truly is available from cash flows from operations than looking at the statement of cash flows alone.

Quality of income ratio — (cash flow from operating activities ÷ net income) measures the portion of income that was generated in cash. A higher quality of income ratio indicates greater ability to finance operating and other cash needs from operating cash inflows. A higher ratio also indicates that it is less likely that the company is using aggressive revenue recognition policies to increase net income.

Capital acquisition ratio — (cash flow from operating activities ÷ cash paid for property, plant, and equipment) reflects the portion of purchases of property, plant, and equipment financed from operating activities without the need for outside debt or equity financing or the sale of other investments or fixed assets. A high ratio benefits the company because it provides the company with opportunities for strategic acquisitions (Libby et al., 2004).

Impact of Additional Cash Flow Disclosures

Noncash investing and financing activities are investing and financing activities that do not involve cash. They include, for example, purchases of fixed assets with long-term debt or stock, exchanges of fixed assets, and exchanges of debt for stock. These transactions are disclosed only as supplemental disclosures to the cash flow statement along with cash paid for taxes and interest under the indirect method.

Conclusion

The statement of cash flows is considered by many to be the most important of the financial statements in indicating a company’s ability to remain a going concern. Although a company’s mission, product, distribution chain, corporate culture, and marketing strategy are all key elements of a successful business, a company cannot survive in the short term without available cash. To employ workers, replenish inventory, and foster growth, a company must have sufficient cash available to pay for its current operating expenses, meet maturing long-term debt obligations, and supply working capital for opportunities that arise. There must exist a balance between having enough cash on hand to meet needs and keeping funds invested in the assets of a business. The statement of cash flows aids users in analyzing whether or not a company is successful in achieving this balance.

References

Kieso, D. E., Weygandt, J. J., & Warfield, T. D. (2010). Intermediate accounting (13th ed.). Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons.

Kimmel, P. D., Weygandt, J. J., & Kieso, D. E. (2009). Accounting: Tools for business decision making (3rd ed.). Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Libby, R., Libby, P., & Short, D. (2004). Financial accounting (4th ed.). Boston: McGraw-Hill/Irwin

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Ch 12/13 Case Studies: The Realco Breadmaster / Supply-Chain Challenges in Post-Earthquake Japan Business Finance Assignment Help

Final Paper

The final assignment for the course is a Final Paper on two cases.
The Final Paper should demonstrate understanding of the reading as well
as the implications of new knowledge. The eight- to ten-page paper
should integrate readings and course discussions into work and life
experiences. It may include an explanation and examples from previous
experiences as well as implications for future applications.

Read the case study at the end of Chapter 12 and the case
study at the end of Chapter 13, and thoroughly answer all the following
questions. Supplement your answers with scholarly research using the
Ashford Online Library. Each case study should be addressed in four to
five pages, resulting in a combined Final Paper of eight to ten pages.

Chapter 12 Case Study: The Realco Breadmaster

  • Develop a master production schedule for the breadmaker. What do the
    projected ending inventory and available-to-promise numbers look like?
    Has Realco “overpromised”? In your view, should Realco update either the
    forecast or the production numbers?
  • Comment on Jack’s approach to order promising. What are the
    advantages? The disadvantages? How would formal master scheduling
    improve this process? What organizational changes would be required?
  • Following up on Question 2, which do you think is worse, refusing a
    customer’s order upfront because you don’t have the units available or
    accepting the order and then failing to deliver? What are the
    implications for master scheduling?
  • Suppose Realco produces 20,000 breadmakers every week, rather than
    40,000 every other week. According to the master schedule record, what
    impact would this have on average inventory levels?

Chapter 13 Case Study: Supply-Chain Challenges in Post-Earthquake Japan

  • What are some of the advantages of the supply chain used in the
    Japanese auto industry before the March 2011 earthquake and tsunami?
    What were some of its disadvantages?
  • Is Toyota’s plan for a “foolproof” supply chain consistent with the Lean production philosophy? Explain.
  • Can you think of any additional ways Toyota (and its competitors in
    the Japanese auto industry) can improve upon the company’s plan to
    create a “foolproof” supply chain?
  • What impact do you think Toyota’s plan will have on the way it handles relationship management in its supply chain?

The Final Paper:

  • Must be eight to ten double-spaced pages in length (not including
    title and references pages) and formatted according to APA style as
    outlined in the Ashford Writing Center (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site..
  • Must include a separate title page with the following:
    • Title of paper
    • Student’s name
    • Course name and number
    • Instructor’s name
    • Date submitted

  • Must begin with an introductory paragraph that has a succinct thesis statement.
  • Must address the topic of the paper with critical thought.
  • Must end with a conclusion that reaffirms your thesis.
  • Must use at least four scholarly sources, including a minimum of two from the Ashford Online Library.
  • Must document all sources in APA style as outlined in the Ashford Writing Center.
  • Must include a separate references page that is formatted according to APA style as outlined in the Ashford Writing Center.

Materials: Bozarth, C. C., & Handfield, R. B. (2016). Introduction to operations and supply chain management (4th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson.

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Process of Six Sigma methodology’s – identify spending patterns / op for improvement? Business Finance Assignment Help

Submit a paper of at least four pages in length, APA, excluding the title and
reference pages, that includes at least two scholarly sources (in
addition to the text). Explain in detail why data analysis skills are so
important to Spend Analysis. Describe how a structured process such as
Six Sigma methodology (Chapter 4) can be useful to identify spending
patterns and identify opportunities for improvement. Recommend which
functional areas of the business, such as finance, should be involved in
Spend Analysis efforts and justify the rationale for your choices.Reference: Bozarth, C. C., & Handfield, R. B. (2016). Introduction to operations and supply chain management (4th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson.

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https://anyessayhelp.com/ (4th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson.

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https://anyessayhelp.com/ (4th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson.

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https://anyessayhelp.com/ (4th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson.

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1050 words summary Business Finance Assignment Help

1050 words summary Business Finance Assignment Help

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