GEN 420 San Diego State COVID 19 and Those Living With Disability Paper Writing Assignment Help

GEN 420 San Diego State COVID 19 and Those Living With Disability Paper Writing Assignment Help. GEN 420 San Diego State COVID 19 and Those Living With Disability Paper Writing Assignment Help.


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Assignment #3:

DISABILITY AS A MEANS OF INNOVATION

15 points

For this assignment, investigate the following topic:
Covid-19 and Disability

Background:
There is great discussion and distress around the subject of societal responses to Covid-19 as it relates to people with disabilities. Whether it be people with medical disabilities/pre-existing conditions, or people with a mental health, developmental, intellectual, or sensory disabilities, the experience of quarantine, social distancing, and the question of receiving medical or other assistance, are daunting for many people with disabilities and their loved-ones. However, most nondisabled people remain unaware of how the Coronavirus is threatening the lives and life quality of people in the disability community. Your task is to learn about how Covid-19 is affecting people with disabilities and then write a thoughtful summary response using the criteria below.

Required Format

●Microsoft Word ONLY

●Responses must be in paragraph format underneath respective questions or sections.

●1” margins

●12-point font

●Double-spaced

●2-page minimum

Required Content

Introduction – 2 points

A paragraph giving an overview of what you have researched and plan on presenting in your paper.

3 References & Summaries – 6 points

Write a paragraph summarizing each online or hard copy reference (3 paragraphs total) and the main points or perspectives made with that reference. Within each paragraph, include the website link to the readings, blogs, and/or online videos you utilized in your inquiry.

Class Connections – 2 points

In 1-2 paragraphs, make the connection between 2 of the following fundamental areas and how they relate to this topic:

●Ableism

●Social Model of Disability

●Accessibility

●Accommodations

●Assistive technology

●Disability rights

●Respectful language

●Eugenics

Reflection – 2 points
In 1-2 paragraphs reflect on the following prompts:

○I used to think that…

○Why did you think that?

○Now I think that…

○Why do you think that now?

○What changed in your thinking?

Closing – 2 points

In 1 paragraph, explain how disability is a tool or a means of innovation? How has the Covid-19 discussion evolved toward new possibilities as a result of disability representation? Or how has it not evolved toward new possibilities? Explain.

Language – 1 point

Throughout your paper, use of person-first language is required (unless you are a person with a disability who prefers identity-first language and informs us of your preference within your paper). Respectful language is required. Inspiration porn is unacceptable. Proper disability-related language etiquette is required. For help with this, please refer to the” Disability-Related Language in Written Assignments” document in Blackboard.

GEN 420 San Diego State COVID 19 and Those Living With Disability Paper Writing Assignment Help[supanova_question]

Collin County Community College Microscopy and Cytology Lab Report Humanities Assignment Help

  • Microscopy

Experiment (dry lab)

  1. Locate the parts below and match them to their description.

ocular lenshead

objective lensstage

condenser lens with filterlight

revolving nosepiecebase

coarse adjustment knobrheostat

fine adjustment knobarm

iris diaphragm

A

Eyepiece

B

Supports the ocular lenses

C

Holds objectives that can be rotated

D

Connects the base and barrel

E

Lens that magnifies the specimen

F

Supports the slide

G

Focuses the light onto the specimen

H

Raises and lowers the stage for focusing

I

Slightly moves the stage to sharpen the image

J

Illuminator

K

Light control

L

Supports the microscope

M

Varies the intensity of the light

  1. Principles of microscopy

Experiment (dry lab)

Field of view

Lens

Lens Power

Ocular lens

Total Magnification

Diameter in mm

(3 significant figures)

Diameter in mm

(3 sig figs)

Area in mm2

A = pr2

(p = 3.14)

(3 sig figs)

Scan Power

4X

10X

40X

4.200

4200

13.85

Low Power

10X

HighPower

40X

Oil Immersion

100X

Note:

  • power of ocular lens does not change
  • to determine total magnification use: lens power X ocular lens power
  • to determine diameter in mm: 40x X 4.200/total mag = diameter in mm
  • to convert mm to mm: mm X 1000 = mm
  • to determine area: radius is ½ of diameter. Take radius and square it then multiply by p (pi)

What happens to the field of view as magnification increases?

(It increase, decrease or stay the same.)

Depth of focus

What happens to the depth of focus as magnification increases?

(It increase, decrease or stay the same.).

Image orientation

Select the letter ‘e’ as you would see through the ocular if it were mounted right side up on the slide.(A, B, C or D.)

II. Cytology

Experiment (dry lab)

A.Wet Mounts

B.Eukaryotes

  • Elodea leaf cells:
  • Label the cell – plasma membrane, cell wall, chloroplast, and cytoplasm
  • Onion cells.
  • Label the cell – plasma membrane, cell wall, cytoplasm, nucleolus, and nucleus
  • Human cheek cells.
  • Label the cell – plasma membrane, cytoplasm and nucleus

A

B

C

D

A

B

C

D

E

A

B

C

C.Prokaryotes

Identify these bacterial cells as coccus, bacillus or spirillum

A

B

C

D. Cell Models: Label the animal and plant cells.

Animal cell model:

Label – centrioles (pair), cytoplasm, Golgi apparatus, mitochondria, nucleus and plasma membrane.

Animal cell model #1

A

Boundary between cytosol and extracellular fluid

B

Flattened stacked discs

C

Synthesize ATP

D

Cytosol + organelles

E

Found in pairs, made of microtubules

F

Holds the DNA

Nucleus:

Label -DNA (chromatin), nuclear membrane, nuclear pore and nucleolus.

Animal cell/Plant cell Model #2

A

Double membrane

B

Assemble ribosomal subunits

C

Genetic material

D

Perforation on the nuclear membrane

Plant cell:

Label – cell wall, central vacuole, chloroplasts, cytoplasm, Golgi apparatus, plasma membrane, mitochondria and nucleus.

Plant cell Model #3

A

Boundary between cytosol and cell wall

B

Synthesis of ATP

C

Flattened stacked discs

D

Supports the cell

E

Holds the DNA

F

Cytosol + organelles

G

Membranous sac stores water + other substances

H

Site for photosynthesis

End of Lab J

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Ashford Week 5 Celiac Disease and Nonceliac Gluten Sensitivity Questions Health Medical Assignment Help

Objectives: Explore the proposed health benefits and potential health concerns of a gluten-free diet.

Instructions: Read the following articles to answer the prompts.

Niland, B.; Cash, B. D. Health Benefits and Adverse Effects of a Gluten-Free Diet in Non–Celiac Disease Patients. Gastroenterol Hepatol (N Y) 2018, 14 (2), 82–91.

Lebwohl, B.; Cao, Y.; Zong, G.; Hu, F. B.; Green, P. H. R.; Neugut, A. I.; Rimm, E. B.; Sampson, L.; Dougherty, L. W.; Giovannucci, E.; Willett, W. C.; Sun, Q.; Chan, A. T. Long Term Gluten Consumption in Adults without Celiac Disease and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease: Prospective Cohort Study. BMJ 2017, 357. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.j1892.

Why has a gluten-free diet risen in popularity over the past decade?

Compare and contrast celiac disease and nonceliac gluten sensitivity.

What nutrients may be underconsumed in an individual following a gluten-free diet. What are some alternative food sources that you could recommend to a patient that requires a gluten-free diet to prevent inadequacy in the aforementioned nutrients?

Summarize the study design and results from Lebwohl et al. State at least one strength and limitation of the study.

Do you think that gluten consumption should be limited by the general population? Why or why not?

[supanova_question]

Abraham Lincoln University Global Business Initiatives Paper Business Finance Assignment Help

Provide strategies, analyses, and explain the concepts/theories that were learned in your program
to address the following (5) subject areas that will be applied to the business scenario:

1. Global Business Initiatives: You must demonstrate an understanding of the significance of
globalization as you will develop and construct strategies for outsourcing. Your strategic analysis
should include the value of international business relationships including contracts, laws, and
your understanding of their application to other countries, outside of your home country.

2. Corporate Social Responsibility & Sustainability: You will create a strategy for corporate
sustainability that include the perspectives of social, economic, political and environmental
impact. The strategy should include any required changes of corporate culture demonstrate that
the implementation of the strategy will lead the organization to sustainable profitability.

3. Strategic Planning & Implementation: Here is an opportunity to incorporate various initiatives
into a strategic plan for an organization of your choice. Perform a SWOT analysis and justify how
it can assist the organization to attain its goals. Write in detail about how your chosen initiatives
can be implemented successfully.

4. Creative Solutions: Write about how you would build a team to create and incorporate activities
that encourage creative problem-solving. Explain in detail how you will foster an environment
within the team that encourages creativity. Describe the process, by outlining a plan to
incorporate creativity and innovation into the organization’s culture. Discuss the role of
creativity in decision-making.

Please write 15-20 pages APA formatted paper with atleast 20 peer reviewed references.

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Temple University History of Indian Sports Market Reflection Discussion Business Finance Assignment Help

This is one of the guest speaker papers you are required to complete. A rubric is available below for your review. The assignment includes a summary of the speaker’s presentation and an analysis. The analysis should be relatable to you, i.e. what did you find useful, what was something you learned that changes the way you think about a concept, etc.

The submission should be no more than one (1) page, single-spaced. If it is more than a page, points will be deducted. The reason for this is to provide practice for you to synthesize your thoughts and effectively communicate them in a concise, executive summary format.

[supanova_question]

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San Jose State University Views of Human Nature Essay Humanities Assignment Help

This is humanities class where we all discuss about the quotes/texts from a book or a reading and without using any research or outside source!!! Evidence for your essay must be based only on the assigned texts. Do not do any outside reading or research in preparing the essay. It should be based on your thought and your thought only.

You can use first person singular (I, me) in writing humanities essay, place yourself in the background of your writing, but have to distinguish between appropriate and inappropriate uses of the first person singular (see Humanities handbook)

Your examination should focus either on a critical difference(or differences)between the views presented or on a key similarity (or similarities) between them, but not both. Although you may at the outset briefly note that there are various similarities between the two works (in an essay that focuses on differences) or certain differences between them (in an essay that focuses on similarities), do not attempt to comprehensively address both differences and similarities, given that this is a short essay. Remember that you will need to advance a unified thesis and provide a claim clarification, and be careful to avoid the problems of offering a splitthesis or a list thesis. See the Humanities Writing Handbookfor guidance on all these points.

Prompt: Another key theme that runs throughout our course is the concept of “human nature.Consider the views of Thomas Hobbes and Martin Luther with regard to this problem. Write a thesisbased essay in which you compareor contrastthe ideas in Hobbes’s Leviathanand the assigned texts from Luther about what human nature is like. Along these lines, for example, you may wish to consider such matters as what these writers think our “natural” qualities and character are, and what they say about the difference our shared human nature makes in the way we live our lives.

Requirements: – must be full 6 pages (NO MORE than 7 pages)

– Must use quotes/texts from the reading/book (see sample format) Do not simply paraphrase!!! You won’t get high score!!

– NO OUTSIDE SOURCE (only use the book/reading and the materials I sent you) again no outside source

– Must see the humanities handbook I attached below to follow format as well as to write an effective counterargument

You must identify and respond to a counterargument. (See the Humanities Writing Handbook.)

– MUST be Plagiarism free

– In each paragraph you must provide at least 3 quotes/ textual citation for evidence to support your points (not simply put it there but apply your political and philosophy thought to respond to the quotes/ texts you use)

– Will discuss more with the Tutor later

For the reading due to over size please use this link to download the reading: https://drive.google.com/drive/u/0/my-drive

Note that the main book is Leviathan by Hobbes. (in the link)

I have attached some important files below to help you.

San Jose State University Views of Human Nature Essay Humanities Assignment Help[supanova_question]

CNU Reasons Why Haier Group Expanded Internationally Discussion Business Finance Assignment Help

The Haier Group began as a nearly bankrupt refrigerator company called Qingdao General Refrigerator in Qingdao, China. In 1984, Zhang Ruimin was appointed as plant director; he remains the company’s CEO today. In 1992, the company was renamed the Haier Group. Under the leadership of Zhang Ruimin, the Haier Group rose to become the largest home appliance manufacturer in the world, with over 80,000 employees in over 100 countries around the world. In the period 1995–2012, the company’s global revenue increased from RMB4.3 billion to RMB163.1 billion (see Exhibit B). 200 150 100 50 0 1995 1997 1999 2001 2003 2005 2007 2009 2011 Exhibit B Revenue of the Haier Group (RMB billions), 1995–2012

Zhang Ruimin had an international outlook from the start. As early as 1984, soon after becoming the company’s director, he introduced technology and equipment from the German company Liebherr to produce refrigerators in China. In 1990, the company started exporting its products to Europe as a contract manufacturer for multinational brands such as Liebherr’s ‘Blue Line’ brand. Zhang Ruimin said: ‘We started exporting to developed markets first because if your products are good enough for consumers in Europe and in the US, you will have better products in developing markets.’ Zhang Ruimin’s ambition was to create China’s first multinational firm.

The company’s exports to the United States started in 1994. Michael Jemal, a partner in the import company Welbilt Appliances, contacted Haier in order to buy 150,000 refrigerators for the US market. All the refrigerators sold within a year, helping Haier to capture 10% of the US market for small compact refrigerators. Following on from this success, the company collaborated with Jemal to market a wider range of products in the US market.

In the 1990s, the company acquired many other Chinese companies. The product range expanded beyond refrigerators to include other home appliances such as washing machines, televisions, air conditioners, and telecommunications equipment. The company improved its products by acquiring foreign technology through joint ventures with companies such as Mitsubishi of Japan and Merloni of Italy. Zhang Ruimin said: ‘First we observe and digest. Then we imitate. In the end, we understand it well enough to design it independently.’

By 1998, the Haier Group had a market share of over 30% in refrigerators, washing machines, and air conditioners in the Chinese market. But the Chinese home appliances market was saturated and there were few opportunities for further domestic expansion. The Chinese government encouraged the company to expand internationally. Furthermore, the company faced greater domestic competition, as foreign companies began to expand aggressively in the Chinese market. In the mid-1990s, a fierce price war broke out among home appliance manufacturers in China. The Haier Group’s CEO, Zhang Ruimin, saw an urgent need for international expansion in 1996: ‘Only by entering the international market can we know what our competition is doing, can we raise our competitive edge. Otherwise, we will lose the Chinese market to foreigners.’ Therefore, the Haier Group began setting up operations overseas.

Zhang Ruimin pursued a different internationalization strategy from that of other Chinese companies, which were satisfied with exporting low-cost products from China as contract manufacturers for foreign firms’ multinational brands. In contrast to other Chinese companies, the Haier Group emulated the strategies of successful Japanese and Korean firms such as Sony, Samsung, and LG in terms of taking its own brand to foreign markets and in terms of establishing production in foreign markets. Zhang Ruimin believed that by setting up manufacturing plants overseas, the Haier Group could gain advantages from avoiding import tariffs and reducing transport costs. He also believed that the company’s products would appeal more to consumers in developed countries if the products were no longer regarded as Chinese imports. ‘All success relies on one thing in overseas markets—creating a localized brand name. We have to make Americans feel that Haier is a localized US brand instead of an imported Chinese brand,’ said Zhang Ruimin. The Haier Group started its international expansion in developing countries. In 1996, the company established a manufacturing plant for refrigerators and air conditioners in Indonesia. In 1997, further expansions took place in the Philippines, Malaysia, Iran, and former Yugoslavia. Once the company gained some international experience, it decided to expand to developed countries. In 1999, the Haier Group expanded to the United States: a refrigerator plant was established in South Carolina and a design centre in Los Angeles. The company’s investment of US$30 million was the largest foreign investment by a Chinese company in the United States. In 2001, the Haier Group purchased a refrigerator plant in Italy and opened research and development centres in Germany, Denmark, and the Netherlands. In 2006, the company expanded to Japan (see Exhibit C). Initially, the Haier Group expanded internationally through joint ventures with local firms in Indonesia, Yugoslavia, and other countries. Within three years, the company decided to expand through

Exhibit C Milestone foreign direct investments by the Haier Group

Sources: Y. Du, ‘Haier’s survival strategy to compete with world giants’, Journal of Chinese Economics & Business Studies 1(2) (2003): 259–66; X. Yang, Y. Jiang, R. Kang, and Y. Ke, ‘A comparative analysis of the internationalization of Chinese and Japanese firms’, Asia Pacific Journal of Management 26 (2009): 141–62; G. Duysters, J. Jacob, C. Lemmens, and J. Yu, ‘Internationalization and technological catching up of emerging multinationals: A comparative case study of China’s Haier Group’, Industrial and Corporate Change 18(2) (2009): 325–49; K. Palepu, T. Khanna, and I. Vargas, ‘Haier: taking a Chinese company global’, Harvard Business School Case No. 9–706–401(2006); and Haier Group website at http://www.haier.com/.

wholly-owned investments (see Exhibit C). But the company’s executives are flexible when taking decisions on international market entry. The entry into the Japanese market through a wholly-ow

wholly-owned investments (see Exhibit C). But the company’s executives are flexible when taking decisions on international market entry. The entry into the Japanese market through a wholly-owned investment would be difficult, so the company set up a joint venture with the Japanese company Sanyo in October 2006 as a means for entering the Japanese market. However, the Haier Group completed the acquisition of Sanyo Electric in 2012 and has operated as a wholly-owned venture in Japan since then.

The Haier Group used its international expansion not only to sell products overseas but also to acquire new knowledge and skills in foreign markets. The company established research and design centres in the United States, Canada, Japan, and France, among others. It also engaged in strategic alliances with companies such as Mitsubishi, Philips, and Sanyo. Zhang Ruimin had the ambition to create a truly innovative global company that competes on the basis of new product innovations, not on the basis of low costs.

As a result of the Haier Group’s international success, the company faced global competitors. When the Haier Group expanded to the United States, it focused on niche markets such as small, compact refrigerators for students and offices, in order to avoid direct competition with companies such as Whirlpool and GE. But foreign competitors have formulated strategies to counteract the Haier Group’s international expansion. Whirlpool and Electrolux have invested tens of millions of dollars to establish a manufacturing and distribution base in China. These competitors were hoping that aggressive competitive moves in the Chinese market would prevent the Haier Group from earning more profits that the company would otherwise use to expand further internationally.

But global rivals such as Whirlpool and Electrolux were unable to stop the Haier Group’s ambitious drive to become a global leader. In 2005, Yang Mianmian, the company’s group president at the time, said: ‘We are number three in the world for white goods. We want to be number one.’ By 2009, the

Haier Group had become the world’s largest white goods company by sales. In 2012, the Haier Group had a market share of 8.6% of the white goods market worldwide, ahead of its key global rivals LG and Whirlpool (with market shares of 5.5% and 4.2% respectively). Even Yang Mianmian had not expected Haier to become the global leader in the industry so soon.

Discussion questions

1. Why did the Haier Group expand internationally?

2. To what extent did the expansion of the Haier Group follow the Uppsala Model?

3. Where should the Haier Group expand next?

Next question:

Shanghai Volkswagen

Shanghai Volkswagen Automotive Co. is a joint venture between the Shanghai Automotive Industry Corporation (SAIC) and Volkswagen Group. The two companies signed a trial agreement in 1982 for manufacturing the Volkswagen Santana model in Shanghai; the joint venture ( JV)—Shanghai Volkswagen (SVW)—was formally established in October 1984 and started operations in September 1985. The joint venture is located in Anting International Auto City on the outskirts of Shanghai. SVW was one of the first Western auto manufacturers in China and was a market leader for a long period of time.

In the early 1980s, the Chinese automobile sector was underdeveloped. The Chinese government had near total control over the sector, deciding who produced what and where. Not surprisingly, then, when the SVW JV was established, it needed the help of the regional government in Shanghai and central government in Beijing to operate in China. Indeed, the president of SAIC and SVW’s general manager’s offices were located directly underneath the office of Shanghai’s mayor.

Throughout the 1980s and 1990s, SVW worked closely with the Chinese government at the regional and central levels and helped SAIC develop a network of local suppliers. SVW worked patiently with its local suppliers, even when they were not able to meet Volkswagen’s stringent quality standards. It regularly dispatched German engineers to serve as technical consultants to local supply firms. By 1997, nearly 93% of the parts used in SVW’s cars were produced in Shanghai and about 50% were produced by suppliers belonging to SAIC.

SVW was rewarded handsomely for its cooperation with the Chinese government and, in particular, for helping SAIC build its supply network. Both regional and central governments provided SVW with preferential treatment in taxation, access to foreign currencies, government procurement, and access to institutional market. For example, in 1996, the Shanghai municipal government banned cars that had an engine capacity of less than 1.6 litres from city streets, a move conveniently ruling out cars produced by competing automakers, and, in 1998, it levied an extra US$10,000 licence fee on Citroën cars (ZX/ Fukang) made in nearby Hubei Province. SVW was also offered the lion’s share of the auto market for

Chinese institutional users—cars for government officials and public organizations—which, at that time, accounted for a large part of the sedan market. A good example of the preferential treatment of SVW is the decision of the Shanghai government, under Zhu Rongji’s leadership, to reserve the Shanghai city taxi market for SVW by requiring that every Shanghai city taxi be an SVW Santana model. As a result, SVW captured around 50% of the market share. However, most of its cars were sold to institutional organizations and taxi companies.

SVW’s early success, though, came at a cost. When the market for the car industry changed dramatically in the early 2000s, SVW was caught off guard. The capabilities that had made it successful in the previous decades suddenly turned into a liability. By the early 2000s, the institutional market had shrunk significantly on the one hand, while on the other hand, the number of private buyers increased significantly. Between 1996 and 2005, private auto ownership in China increased by 22% annually, and by the end of 2005, 58.5% of China’s vehicle fleet was privately owned. However, because SVW served a protected market, its products in terms of both price and quality were not able to serve private consumers, who were far more responsive to price than institutional consumers and were more concerned with quality and style.

In addition to changes in consumer profile, several new competitors, including General Motors, Toyota, Nissan, and Ford, entered the Chinese auto markets to serve the ever-increasing private market segment. The increase in the number of competitors caused prices to fall significantly. For example, the price of the basic Santana, which was 200,000 RMB (US$24,096) in the early 1990s, fell to 89,900 RMB (US$10,857) by 2004.

SVW realized that it needed to change in order to compete in the new business environment. Its market share in the passenger car segment declined by nearly two-thirds from 50% to 17% in just four years from 2001 to 2005.

SVW started by trying to change its supply operations by tightening quality and cost control through the supply chain. However, this was met with resistance by its partner—SAIC— and the regional government, as well as by its suppliers. Suppliers were used to being paid inflated prices for low-quality parts. For nearly two decades, suppliers within the SAIC group got used to supplying SVW, no matter how high their costs were, and therefore resisted SVW’s plans to move to a cost-efficient supply network. SAIC saw SVW’s move to change its supply chain operations as a threat to the development of its suppliers and resisted moves by SVW to obtain parts from outside its network of suppliers. The regional government also resisted moves to allow SVW to be served by suppliers located outside the Shanghai municipality. As competition intensified in the early 2000s, SVW had to deal with stiff resistance from its suppliers, local government, and its local partner. Tensions started appearing in a partnership that had worked perfectly well for over two decades. General Motors, which had signed a joint venture with SAIC, became the new market leader in China. Volkswagen and SAIC locked horns and blamed each other for a lack of flexibility. SAIC wanted more up-to-date technology and models and know-how transfer to the JV. Volkswagen asked for modernization of the supply network and the ability to source parts from outside the SAIC network when its suppliers did not meet its criteria. However, SAIC had more bargaining power as a number of multinational firms were waiting to take SVW’s place. To break the deadlock and help its JV in China to regain its competitive advantage, Volkswagen promised to transfer more technological know-how to SVW, to help the JV introduce new models, and to assist it to become a world-class car producer rather than a production plant for the Chinese market. SVW also convinced SAIC that an efficient supply chain would be good for all parties concerned. By the late 2000s, the changes paid off. SVW had developed a different relationship with its suppliers. The new relationship is based on hard bargaining and competition with suppliers from outside the SAIC group and the Shanghai municipality. On the production side, SVexecutive of Volkswagen China, reported that ‘we are practically sold out of many of our models’. The Shanghai Volkswagen joint venture eventually lost the pole position to Shanghai GM in 2011 and 2012 but regained it again in 2013. In the early 2010s, SVW launched its plan to significantly increase its production in China. The JV started new production plans in Anting, Nanjing, Ningbo, Yizheng, and Jiangsu provinces. On 15 November 2013, SVW celebrated the production of the ten-millionth vehicle produced by the joint venture. By the end of 2013, China had become the largest sales market of the Volkswagen group.

W had been very aggressive and introduced a number of new models, such as the Tiguan sport-utility vehicle, the Audi Q5, and an upgraded Volkswagen Jetta that appealed to private buyers. In 2010, the China Association of Automobile Manufacturers reported that SVW had regained the number one position in the Chinese auto market by selling over 700,000 cars in China in 2009, and Winfried Vahland, president and chiefThe Haier Group began as a nearly bankrupt refrigerator company called Qingdao General Refrigerator in Qingdao, China. In 1984, Zhang Ruimin was appointed as plant director; he remains the company’s CEO today. In 1992, the company was renamed the Haier Group. Under the leadership of Zhang Ruimin, the Haier Group rose to become the largest home appliance manufacturer in the world, with over 80,000 employees in over 100 countries around the world. In the period 1995–2012, the company’s global revenue increased from RMB4.3 billion to RMB163.1 billion (see Exhibit B). 200 150 100 50 0 1995 1997 1999 2001 2003 2005 2007 2009 2011 Exhibit B Revenue of the Haier Group (RMB billions), 1995–2012

Zhang Ruimin had an international outlook from the start. As early as 1984, soon after becoming the company’s director, he introduced technology and equipment from the German company Liebherr to produce refrigerators in China. In 1990, the company started exporting its products to Europe as a contract manufacturer for multinational brands such as Liebherr’s ‘Blue Line’ brand. Zhang Ruimin said: ‘We started exporting to developed markets first because if your products are good enough for consumers in Europe and in the US, you will have better products in developing markets.’ Zhang Ruimin’s ambition was to create China’s first multinational firm.

The company’s exports to the United States started in 1994. Michael Jemal, a partner in the import company Welbilt Appliances, contacted Haier in order to buy 150,000 refrigerators for the US market. All the refrigerators sold within a year, helping Haier to capture 10% of the US market for small compact refrigerators. Following on from this success, the company collaborated with Jemal to market a wider range of products in the US market.

In the 1990s, the company acquired many other Chinese companies. The product range expanded beyond refrigerators to include other home appliances such as washing machines, televisions, air conditioners, and telecommunications equipment. The company improved its products by acquiring foreign technology through joint ventures with companies such as Mitsubishi of Japan and Merloni of Italy. Zhang Ruimin said: ‘First we observe and digest. Then we imitate. In the end, we understand it well enough to design it independently.’

By 1998, the Haier Group had a market share of over 30% in refrigerators, washing machines, and air conditioners in the Chinese market. But the Chinese home appliances market was saturated and there were few opportunities for further domestic expansion. The Chinese government encouraged the company to expand internationally. Furthermore, the company faced greater domestic competition, as foreign companies began to expand aggressively in the Chinese market. In the mid-1990s, a fierce price war broke out among home appliance manufacturers in China. The Haier Group’s CEO, Zhang Ruimin, saw an urgent need for international expansion in 1996: ‘Only by entering the international market can we know what our competition is doing, can we raise our competitive edge. Otherwise, we will lose the Chinese market to foreigners.’ Therefore, the Haier Group began setting up operations overseas.

Zhang Ruimin pursued a different internationalization strategy from that of other Chinese companies, which were satisfied with exporting low-cost products from China as contract manufacturers for foreign firms’ multinational brands. In contrast to other Chinese companies, the Haier Group emulated the strategies of successful Japanese and Korean firms such as Sony, Samsung, and LG in terms of taking its own brand to foreign markets and in terms of establishing production in foreign markets. Zhang Ruimin believed that by setting up manufacturing plants overseas, the Haier Group could gain advantages from avoiding import tariffs and reducing transport costs. He also believed that the company’s products would appeal more to consumers in developed countries if the products were no longer regarded as Chinese imports. ‘All success relies on one thing in overseas markets—creating a localized brand name. We have to make Americans feel that Haier is a localized US brand instead of an imported Chinese brand,’ said Zhang Ruimin. The Haier Group started its international expansion in developing countries. In 1996, the company established a manufacturing plant for refrigerators and air conditioners in Indonesia. In 1997, further expansions took place in the Philippines, Malaysia, Iran, and former Yugoslavia. Once the company gained some international experience, it decided to expand to developed countries. In 1999, the Haier Group expanded to the United States: a refrigerator plant was established in South Carolina and a design centre in Los Angeles. The company’s investment of US$30 million was the largest foreign investment by a Chinese company in the United States. In 2001, the Haier Group purchased a refrigerator plant in Italy and opened research and development centres in Germany, Denmark, and the Netherlands. In 2006, the company expanded to Japan (see Exhibit C). Initially, the Haier Group expanded internationally through joint ventures with local firms in Indonesia, Yugoslavia, and other countries. Within three years, the company decided to expand through

Exhibit C Milestone foreign direct investments by the Haier Group

Sources: Y. Du, ‘Haier’s survival strategy to compete with world giants’, Journal of Chinese Economics & Business Studies 1(2) (2003): 259–66; X. Yang, Y. Jiang, R. Kang, and Y. Ke, ‘A comparative analysis of the internationalization of Chinese and Japanese firms’, Asia Pacific Journal of Management 26 (2009): 141–62; G. Duysters, J. Jacob, C. Lemmens, and J. Yu, ‘Internationalization and technological catching up of emerging multinationals: A comparative case study of China’s Haier Group’, Industrial and Corporate Change 18(2) (2009): 325–49; K. Palepu, T. Khanna, and I. Vargas, ‘Haier: taking a Chinese company global’, Harvard Business School Case No. 9–706–401(2006); and Haier Group website at http://www.haier.com/.

wholly-owned investments (see Exhibit C). But the company’s executives are flexible when taking decisions on international market entry. The entry into the Japanese market through a wholly-ow

wholly-owned investments (see Exhibit C). But the company’s executives are flexible when taking decisions on international market entry. The entry into the Japanese market through a wholly-owned investment would be difficult, so the company set up a joint venture with the Japanese company Sanyo in October 2006 as a means for entering the Japanese market. However, the Haier Group completed the acquisition of Sanyo Electric in 2012 and has operated as a wholly-owned venture in Japan since then.

The Haier Group used its international expansion not only to sell products overseas but also to acquire new knowledge and skills in foreign markets. The company established research and design centres in the United States, Canada, Japan, and France, among others. It also engaged in strategic alliances with companies such as Mitsubishi, Philips, and Sanyo. Zhang Ruimin had the ambition to create a truly innovative global company that competes on the basis of new product innovations, not on the basis of low costs.

As a result of the Haier Group’s international success, the company faced global competitors. When the Haier Group expanded to the United States, it focused on niche markets such as small, compact refrigerators for students and offices, in order to avoid direct competition with companies such as Whirlpool and GE. But foreign competitors have formulated strategies to counteract the Haier Group’s international expansion. Whirlpool and Electrolux have invested tens of millions of dollars to establish a manufacturing and distribution base in China. These competitors were hoping that aggressive competitive moves in the Chinese market would prevent the Haier Group from earning more profits that the company would otherwise use to expand further internationally.

But global rivals such as Whirlpool and Electrolux were unable to stop the Haier Group’s ambitious drive to become a global leader. In 2005, Yang Mianmian, the company’s group president at the time, said: ‘We are number three in the world for white goods. We want to be number one.’ By 2009, the

Haier Group had become the world’s largest white goods company by sales. In 2012, the Haier Group had a market share of 8.6% of the white goods market worldwide, ahead of its key global rivals LG and Whirlpool (with market shares of 5.5% and 4.2% respectively). Even Yang Mianmian had not expected Haier to become the global leader in the industry so soon.

Discussion questions

1. Why did the Haier Group expand internationally?

2. To what extent did the expansion of the Haier Group follow the Uppsala Model?

3. Where should the Haier Group expand next?

Next question:

Shanghai Volkswagen

Shanghai Volkswagen Automotive Co. is a joint venture between the Shanghai Automotive Industry Corporation (SAIC) and Volkswagen Group. The two companies signed a trial agreement in 1982 for manufacturing the Volkswagen Santana model in Shanghai; the joint venture ( JV)—Shanghai Volkswagen (SVW)—was formally established in October 1984 and started operations in September 1985. The joint venture is located in Anting International Auto City on the outskirts of Shanghai. SVW was one of the first Western auto manufacturers in China and was a market leader for a long period of time.

In the early 1980s, the Chinese automobile sector was underdeveloped. The Chinese government had near total control over the sector, deciding who produced what and where. Not surprisingly, then, when the SVW JV was established, it needed the help of the regional government in Shanghai and central government in Beijing to operate in China. Indeed, the president of SAIC and SVW’s general manager’s offices were located directly underneath the office of Shanghai’s mayor.

Throughout the 1980s and 1990s, SVW worked closely with the Chinese government at the regional and central levels and helped SAIC develop a network of local suppliers. SVW worked patiently with its local suppliers, even when they were not able to meet Volkswagen’s stringent quality standards. It regularly dispatched German engineers to serve as technical consultants to local supply firms. By 1997, nearly 93% of the parts used in SVW’s cars were produced in Shanghai and about 50% were produced by suppliers belonging to SAIC.

SVW was rewarded handsomely for its cooperation with the Chinese government and, in particular, for helping SAIC build its supply network. Both regional and central governments provided SVW with preferential treatment in taxation, access to foreign currencies, government procurement, and access to institutional market. For example, in 1996, the Shanghai municipal government banned cars that had an engine capacity of less than 1.6 litres from city streets, a move conveniently ruling out cars produced by competing automakers, and, in 1998, it levied an extra US$10,000 licence fee on Citroën cars (ZX/ Fukang) made in nearby Hubei Province. SVW was also offered the lion’s share of the auto market for

Chinese institutional users—cars for government officials and public organizations—which, at that time, accounted for a large part of the sedan market. A good example of the preferential treatment of SVW is the decision of the Shanghai government, under Zhu Rongji’s leadership, to reserve the Shanghai city taxi market for SVW by requiring that every Shanghai city taxi be an SVW Santana model. As a result, SVW captured around 50% of the market share. However, most of its cars were sold to institutional organizations and taxi companies.

SVW’s early success, though, came at a cost. When the market for the car industry changed dramatically in the early 2000s, SVW was caught off guard. The capabilities that had made it successful in the previous decades suddenly turned into a liability. By the early 2000s, the institutional market had shrunk significantly on the one hand, while on the other hand, the number of private buyers increased significantly. Between 1996 and 2005, private auto ownership in China increased by 22% annually, and by the end of 2005, 58.5% of China’s vehicle fleet was privately owned. However, because SVW served a protected market, its products in terms of both price and quality were not able to serve private consumers, who were far more responsive to price than institutional consumers and were more concerned with quality and style.

In addition to changes in consumer profile, several new competitors, including General Motors, Toyota, Nissan, and Ford, entered the Chinese auto markets to serve the ever-increasing private market segment. The increase in the number of competitors caused prices to fall significantly. For example, the price of the basic Santana, which was 200,000 RMB (US$24,096) in the early 1990s, fell to 89,900 RMB (US$10,857) by 2004.

SVW realized that it needed to change in order to compete in the new business environment. Its market share in the passenger car segment declined by nearly two-thirds from 50% to 17% in just four years from 2001 to 2005.

SVW started by trying to change its supply operations by tightening quality and cost control through the supply chain. However, this was met with resistance by its partner—SAIC— and the regional government, as well as by its suppliers. Suppliers were used to being paid inflated prices for low-quality parts. For nearly two decades, suppliers within the SAIC group got used to supplying SVW, no matter how high their costs were, and therefore resisted SVW’s plans to move to a cost-efficient supply network. SAIC saw SVW’s move to change its supply chain operations as a threat to the development of its suppliers and resisted moves by SVW to obtain parts from outside its network of suppliers. The regional government also resisted moves to allow SVW to be served by suppliers located outside the Shanghai municipality. As competition intensified in the early 2000s, SVW had to deal with stiff resistance from its suppliers, local government, and its local partner. Tensions started appearing in a partnership that had worked perfectly well for over two decades. General Motors, which had signed a joint venture with SAIC, became the new market leader in China. Volkswagen and SAIC locked horns and blamed each other for a lack of flexibility. SAIC wanted more up-to-date technology and models and know-how transfer to the JV. Volkswagen asked for modernization of the supply network and the ability to source parts from outside the SAIC network when its suppliers did not meet its criteria. However, SAIC had more bargaining power as a number of multinational firms were waiting to take SVW’s place. To break the deadlock and help its JV in China to regain its competitive advantage, Volkswagen promised to transfer more technological know-how to SVW, to help the JV introduce new models, and to assist it to become a world-class car producer rather than a production plant for the Chinese market. SVW also convinced SAIC that an efficient supply chain would be good for all parties concerned. By the late 2000s, the changes paid off. SVW had developed a different relationship with its suppliers. The new relationship is based on hard bargaining and competition with suppliers from outside the SAIC group and the Shanghai municipality. On the production side, SVexecutive of Volkswagen China, reported that ‘we are practically sold out of many of our models’. The Shanghai Volkswagen joint venture eventually lost the pole position to Shanghai GM in 2011 and 2012 but regained it again in 2013. In the early 2010s, SVW launched its plan to significantly increase its production in China. The JV started new production plans in Anting, Nanjing, Ningbo, Yizheng, and Jiangsu provinces. On 15 November 2013, SVW celebrated the production of the ten-millionth vehicle produced by the joint venture. By the end of 2013, China had become the largest sales market of the Volkswagen group.

W had been very aggressive and introduced a number of new models, such as the Tiguan sport-utility vehicle, the Audi Q5, and an upgraded Volkswagen Jetta that appealed to private buyers. In 2010, the China Association of Automobile Manufacturers reported that SVW had regained the number one position in the Chinese auto market by selling over 700,000 cars in China in 2009, and Winfried Vahland, president and chief

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Rasmussen College Outcome Based Cycle of Clinical Reasoning Discussion Health Medical Assignment Help

Modify clinical judgment within an iterative, outcome-based cycle of clinical reasoning and client needs.

Scenario

As part of the clinical portion of your BSN Capstone course in your senior semester, you have the opportunity to attend a two-day seminar with senior nursing students from other academic institutions. The theme of this seminar is the application of clinical judgment to determine the best evidence-based solutions for nursing practice.

Instructions

For a clinical judgment roundtable with faculty and students that is sponsored by your academic institution, you must prepare one scenario based handout to promote robust discussion regarding the application of clinical judgment as an outcomes-based dynamic cycle of clinical reasoning and client needs. The handout must contain these components:

  • Describe a clinical situation where you applied an outcome-based cycle of clinical reasoning to select what you considered the “best” client intervention based on information available.
  • Include relevant external and internal cues and hypotheses
  • Discuss the outcomes based, iterative cycle of clinical reasoning you applied after the initial intervention to select the next “best” interventions appropriate for the particular situation based on client needs.
  • Rationales and evidence based findings were included to support choices for the next “best” interventions

Resources

Grading Rubric

F

F

C

B

A

0

1

2

3

4

Did not Submit

No Pass

Competence

Proficiency

Mastery

Not Submitted

The student did not attempt a handout describing a clinical situation relevant to the application of an outcome-based cycle of clinical reasoning.

The handout contained a basic description of a clinical situation where the student attempted to apply an outcome-based cycle of clinical reasoning to select the “best” client intervention based on information available.

The handout contained a description of a clinical situation where the student applied an outcome-based cycle of clinical reasoning to select the “best” client intervention based on information available.

The handout contained a detailed description of a clinical situation where the student applied an outcome-based cycle of clinical reasoning to select the “best” client intervention based on information available.

Not Submitted

No obvious attempt to explain the cycle of clinical reasoning was made, and no external and internal cues and hypotheses were discussed.

An attempt to explain the cycle of clinical reasoning was made but included few external and internal cues and hypotheses.

The cycle of clinical reasoning was explained in some detail using some external and internal cues and hypotheses.

The cycle of clinical reasoning was explained using a complete list of external and internal cues and hypotheses.

Not Submitted

The student did not attempt a handout describing a clinical situation relevant to the application of an outcome-based cycle of clinical reasoning.

No rationales or evidence-based findings for any choices related to “best” interventions were included.

Described a basic description of an outcomes-based, iterative cycle of clinical reasoning to select the next “best” interventions appropriate for the particular situation.

Described an appropriate outcomes-based, iterative cycle of clinical reasoning to select the next “best” interventions appropriate for the particular situation.

Described a detailed, appropriate outcomes-based, iterative cycle of clinical reasoning to select the next “best” interventions appropriate for the particular situation.

Not submitted

The choices were not supported by rationales and lacked a summary of appropriate evidence-based findings.

The choices were minimally supported by rationales and lacked a summary of appropriate evidence-based findings.

The choices were moderately supported by rationales and at least one summary of appropriate evidence-based findings.

The choices were supported by robust rationales and at least one summary of appropriate evidence-based findings.

Not Submitted

Lack of formal style in the handout with, numerous spelling, grammar, or APA format errors present which often detracted from the readability and intent of the document.

Formal style reflected in most of the handout, but not maintained throughout. Some spelling, grammar, or APA format errors present which occasionally detracted from the readability and intent of the document.

Formal style reflected throughout the majority of the handout, with minor spelling, grammar, or APA format errors present which did not detract from the readability and intent of the document.

Formal style reflected throughout the entire handout, including no spelling, grammar, or APA format errors present.

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King Fahd University Collecting and Analyzing Big Data Research Paper Computer Science Assignment Help

Completed papers will be in 12-point type, double-spaced, and consist of not less than 6 pages (excluding illustrations, graphs, charts, the cover sheet)

Collecting and Processing Big Data

The paper has to define and explain Big Data but focus on the procedure to record, store, and analyze Big Data. How these data can assist/support decision making and analyzing trends which makes it a big important side in information systems. Basically, the paper is to be about the use of this technology. Also it has to include how we can learn more from big data, how they are being analyzed and how to lower/reduce its disadvantages.

You can find your own references but at least five of these below 6 refrences have to be used in the paper in the paper.

References:

akr, S., & Zomaya, A. (2017). Handbook of Big Data Technologies. In Handbook of Big Data Technologies. Springer International Publishing AG. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-49340-4

Khan, N., Yaqoob, I., Hashem, I., Inayat, Z., Mahmoud Ali, W., Alam, M., Shiraz, M., & Gani, A. (2014). Big Data: Survey, Technologies, Opportunities, and Challenges. TheScientificWorld, 2014, 1–18. https://doi.org/10.1155/2014/712826

Oussous, A., Benjelloun, F., Ait Lahcen, A., & Belfkih, S. (2018). Big Data technologies: A survey. Journal of King Saud University. Computer and Information Sciences, 30(4), 431–448. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jksuci.2017.06.001

Storey, V., & Song, I. (2017). Big data technologies and Management: What conceptual modeling can do. Data & Knowledge Engineering, 108, 50–67. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.datak.2017.01.001

Akter, S., & Wamba, S. (2016). Big data analytics in E-commerce: a systematic review and agenda for future research. Electronic Markets, 26(2), 173–194. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12525-016-0219-0

Mehmood, E., & Anees, T. (2020). Challenges and Solutions for Processing Real-Time Big Data Stream: A Systematic Literature Review. IEEE Access, 8, 119123–119143. https://doi.org/10.1109/ACCESS.2020.3005268

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NUR 4153CBE Rasmussen College Clinical Reasoning and Judgment Paper Health Medical Assignment Help

Modify clinical judgment within an iterative, outcome-based cycle of clinical reasoning and client needs.

Scenario

As part of the clinical portion of your BSN Capstone course in your senior semester, you have the opportunity to attend a two-day seminar with senior nursing students from other academic institutions. The theme of this seminar is the application of clinical judgment to determine the best evidence-based solutions for nursing practice.

Instructions

For a clinical judgment roundtable with faculty and students that is sponsored by your academic institution, you must prepare one scenario based handout to promote robust discussion regarding the application of clinical judgment as an outcomes-based dynamic cycle of clinical reasoning and client needs. The handout must contain these components:

  • Describe a clinical situation where you applied an outcome-based cycle of clinical reasoning to select what you considered the “best” client intervention based on information available.
  • Include relevant external and internal cues and hypotheses
  • Discuss the outcomes based, iterative cycle of clinical reasoning you applied after the initial intervention to select the next “best” interventions appropriate for the particular situation based on client needs.
  • Rationales and evidence based findings were included to support choices for the next “best” interventions

Resources

Grading Rubric

F

F

C

B

A

0

1

2

3

4

Did not Submit

No Pass

Competence

Proficiency

Mastery

Not Submitted

The student did not attempt a handout describing a clinical situation relevant to the application of an outcome-based cycle of clinical reasoning.

The handout contained a basic description of a clinical situation where the student attempted to apply an outcome-based cycle of clinical reasoning to select the “best” client intervention based on information available.

The handout contained a description of a clinical situation where the student applied an outcome-based cycle of clinical reasoning to select the “best” client intervention based on information available.

The handout contained a detailed description of a clinical situation where the student applied an outcome-based cycle of clinical reasoning to select the “best” client intervention based on information available.

Not Submitted

No obvious attempt to explain the cycle of clinical reasoning was made, and no external and internal cues and hypotheses were discussed.

An attempt to explain the cycle of clinical reasoning was made but included few external and internal cues and hypotheses.

The cycle of clinical reasoning was explained in some detail using some external and internal cues and hypotheses.

The cycle of clinical reasoning was explained using a complete list of external and internal cues and hypotheses.

Not Submitted

The student did not attempt a handout describing a clinical situation relevant to the application of an outcome-based cycle of clinical reasoning.

No rationales or evidence-based findings for any choices related to “best” interventions were included.

Described a basic description of an outcomes-based, iterative cycle of clinical reasoning to select the next “best” interventions appropriate for the particular situation.

Described an appropriate outcomes-based, iterative cycle of clinical reasoning to select the next “best” interventions appropriate for the particular situation.

Described a detailed, appropriate outcomes-based, iterative cycle of clinical reasoning to select the next “best” interventions appropriate for the particular situation.

Not submitted

The choices were not supported by rationales and lacked a summary of appropriate evidence-based findings.

The choices were minimally supported by rationales and lacked a summary of appropriate evidence-based findings.

The choices were moderately supported by rationales and at least one summary of appropriate evidence-based findings.

The choices were supported by robust rationales and at least one summary of appropriate evidence-based findings.

Not Submitted

Lack of formal style in the handout with, numerous spelling, grammar, or APA format errors present which often detracted from the readability and intent of the document.

Formal style reflected in most of the handout, but not maintained throughout. Some spelling, grammar, or APA format errors present which occasionally detracted from the readability and intent of the document.

Formal style reflected throughout the majority of the handout, with minor spelling, grammar, or APA format errors present which did not detract from the readability and intent of the document.

Formal style reflected throughout the entire handout, including no spelling, grammar, or APA format errors present.

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GEN 420 San Diego State COVID 19 and Those Living With Disability Paper Writing Assignment Help

GEN 420 San Diego State COVID 19 and Those Living With Disability Paper Writing Assignment Help

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