Please type up an Appellate Brief using the scenario below as if you are living in Pennsylvania

Please type up an Appellate Brief using the scenario below as if you are living in Pennsylvania. Please type up an Appellate Brief using the scenario below as if you are living in Pennsylvania.

Appellate Brief Scenario:
Your client, Ms. Kimberly Hall, stands convicted under your state law for charges involving theft, trafficking in stolen property, fraud, and alteration of vehicle identification numbers. Hall runs a small salvage yard on a 3.5 acre piece of property surrounded by several fences, tall trees, dense scrub bushes, and posted No Trespassing signs. The property contains 2 structures: a small one-room cabin, in which Hall resides, and a separate structure, approximately 30 feet high, with sliding barn doors on all four sides, no windows, and no roof.
Early on the day of Hall’s arrest, state and local authorities conducted a drone-surveillance sweep after an anonymous tip line received several calls reporting the operation of multiple automotive chop shops in a rural location within your state of residence. Captured video of the larger structure, obtained by the drone’s camera from approximately 100 feet in the air and simultaneously transmitted to police officers on the ground, revealed the presence of multiple dismantled vehicles, a pile of license plates, various automotive parts and tools, including grinders, cutting saws, hoists and welding rigs. Hall was taken into police custody at approximately 5:00 a.m. that morning, and was subsequently charged based on that footage.
At trial, several residents claimed that the presence of the drones in the early morning hours resulted in unnecessary panic, which quickly swept the small community, and resulted in multiple calls to local police dispatch, some minor property damage, and at least one assault. Sally Jones, who lives adjacent to Ms. Hall, testified that, “Conner Peterson and those damned drones caused enough drama and paranoia to end a 25-year friendship in a fistfight.” Conner Peterson, a survivalist/prepper and avid short-wave radio enthusiast, stated for the record that, on the morning of Hall’s arrest, he was up late monitoring radio transmissions between members of a known local anti-government group who were discussing plans for “something big” involving the use of personal drones. Mr. Peterson stated that he heard an unusual buzzing noise coming from the west side of his property as he stood outside with his dog at approximately 4:00 a.m. When he spotted a drone hovering between his house and his garage, he immediately began calling to warn his neighbors that something was up, and to remain vigilant.
The trial court considered all testimony, exhibits, and arguments and found your client guilty.

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CJ105 Concept of Criminal Law

Watch the following video on Gideon v. Wainwright.
https://www.c-span.org/video/?c4870011/user-clip-gideons-trumpet (Links to an external site.)
This video is from CBS news in the early 1960’s soon after the decision in the case.
Write a brief 2-3 page paper about the case. Include a brief summary about the case and do you think all criminal defendants should have an attorney paid for by the state if necessary. What do you think about the ability to fairly defend yourself with out an attorney. Also consider when a person wants to act as their own attorney, should they be able to do so. Also consider Clarence Gideon who filed his petition to the US Supreme Ct with a 8th grade education and without the help of an attorney.

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Chapter 42 Briefs

Please type up an Appellate Brief using the scenario below as if you are living in Pennsylvania disscussion-post/”>Law Assignment Help Please do an IRAC application for these the READING FOR THESE CASES WILL BE ATTACHED BELOW
Krupinski v. Deyesso
and Coyle v. Schwartz
Here is how to do IRAC format.
Issue: What question must be answered in order to reach a conclusion in the case? The Issue must be expressed in the form of a legal question which, when answered, gives the result in the case. Make it specific (e.g. “Has there been a false imprisonment if the plaintiff was asleep at the time of ‘confinement’?”) rather than general (e.g. Did the defendant owe a duty of care to the plaintiff when the plaintiff was trespassing on the defendant’s property?). Some cases present more than one issue; if there is more than one issue, it is OK to write more than one, but be sure to list the principal one and focus on that.
Rule: The Rule is the law that applies to the principal issue. It should be stated as a general
principal, (e.g. A duty of care is owed whenever the defendant should anticipate that her conduct could create a risk of harm to the plaintiff.) not a conclusion to the case being briefed, (e.g. “The plaintiff was negligent.”). Typically, the Rule can be expressed in one or two sentences.
Application: The Application is a discussion of how the Rule applies to the facts of the case. Essentially, the Application section is a description of the relevant facts, the parties’ arguments and positions in the case, and the court’s thought process by which it answered the Issue and established the Rule. While the Issue and Rule are normally only one or two sentences each, theApplication section of a brief should be two to four paragraphs long. It should be written debate, not simply a statement of the Conclusion. Whenever possible, present both sides of any issue. Do not begin with your Conclusion. The Application section shows how you can track the court’s reasoning on paper and is the most difficult skill you will learn. It is also permissible to put the relevant facts of the case in a separate section of the Brief.
Conclusion: What was the result of the case? Did the appellate or supreme court affirm, reverse or reverse and remand the lower court’s decision?
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CJ105 Concept of Criminal Law

Read the briefs and the Supreme Ct. opinion in the following case:
State of Iowa v. Iowa District Court for Jones Countyhttps://www.iowacourts.gov/iowa-courts/supreme-court/supreme-court-oral-argument-schedule/case/17-1023 (Links to an external site.)
Write a 1-2 page paper on whether you agree with how the supreme court ruled or not and why.

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https://anyessayhelp.com/ Please do an IRAC application for these the READING FOR THESE CASES WILL BE ATTACHED BELOW
Krupinski v. Deyesso
and Coyle v. Schwartz
Here is how to do IRAC format.
Issue: What question must be answered in order to reach a conclusion in the case? The Issue must be expressed in the form of a legal question which, when answered, gives the result in the case. Make it specific (e.g. “Has there been a false imprisonment if the plaintiff was asleep at the time of ‘confinement’?”) rather than general (e.g. Did the defendant owe a duty of care to the plaintiff when the plaintiff was trespassing on the defendant’s property?). Some cases present more than one issue; if there is more than one issue, it is OK to write more than one, but be sure to list the principal one and focus on that.
Rule: The Rule is the law that applies to the principal issue. It should be stated as a general
principal, (e.g. A duty of care is owed whenever the defendant should anticipate that her conduct could create a risk of harm to the plaintiff.) not a conclusion to the case being briefed, (e.g. “The plaintiff was negligent.”). Typically, the Rule can be expressed in one or two sentences.
Application: The Application is a discussion of how the Rule applies to the facts of the case. Essentially, the Application section is a description of the relevant facts, the parties’ arguments and positions in the case, and the court’s thought process by which it answered the Issue and established the Rule. While the Issue and Rule are normally only one or two sentences each, theApplication section of a brief should be two to four paragraphs long. It should be written debate, not simply a statement of the Conclusion. Whenever possible, present both sides of any issue. Do not begin with your Conclusion. The Application section shows how you can track the court’s reasoning on paper and is the most difficult skill you will learn. It is also permissible to put the relevant facts of the case in a separate section of the Brief.
Conclusion: What was the result of the case? Did the appellate or supreme court affirm, reverse or reverse and remand the lower court’s decision?
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