researching a topic and then detailing your findings with an argumentative three-point thesis statement. The topic is completely up

researching a topic and then detailing your findings with an argumentative three-point thesis statement. The topic is completely up. researching a topic and then detailing your findings with an argumentative three-point thesis statement. The topic is completely up.

researching a topic and then detailing your findings with an argumentative three-point thesis statement. The topic is completely up to you, think of something in the fields of current events, politics, art/pop culture, sports, or an aspect of your major field that piques your interests. I want you to write about something you want to write about, which is why there’s a great deal of freedom for your topic. You will need to back up , and consider alternative points of view.
[supanova_question]

Opportunities & Challenges with Patient Safety Goals. Select one of the 2021

Opportunities & Challenges with Patient Safety Goals.

Select one of the 2021 National Patient Safety Goals.

Share your thoughts about the opportunities and challenges related to achieving the goal in your work environment.

  Instructions:

At least 500 words, and phrase should be clear and concise without improper grammar, punctuation and misspelling.

Formatted and cited in current APA style with support from at least 2 academic sources.

Acceptable references include scholarly journal articles or primary legal sources (statutes, court opinions), journal articles, and books published in the last five years.

The paper should follow this setting:

An introduction that contains an overview of the topic then recall and announce the paragraphs.

The body (development) should introduce and elaborate the point of the paragraph with supporting details or evidence follow a closing statement of each paragraph.

A conclusion should include a strong statement that tie together the main points of the paper.

Resources: National Patient Safety Goals

(Note: The citations below are provided for your research convenience. You should always cross reference the current APA guide for correct styling of citations and references in your academic work.)

Read

Mason, D. J., Gardner, D. B., Outlaw, F. H. & O’Grady, E. T. (2020).

Chapters 56, 58-60, 62-63, 66, & 70-71

Dyal, B., Whyte, M., Blankenship, S. M., & Ford, L. G. (2016). Outcomes of implementing an evidence-based hypertension clinical guideline in an academic nurse managed health center. Worldviews on Evidence-Based Nursing, 13(1), 89–93. https://doi.org/10.1111/wvn.12135

Thomas-Hawkins, C. (2020). Registered Nurse staffing, workload, and nursing care left undone, and their relationships to patient safety in hemodialysis units. Nephrology Nursing Journal, 47(2), 133–143. https://doi.org/10.37526/1526-744X.2020.47.2.133

Sherwood, G., & Zomorodi, M. (2016). A new mindset for quality and safety: The QSEN Competencies redefine nurses’ roles in practice. Nephrology Nursing Journal, 41(1), 15–72. 

The Joint Commission. (2021). Hospital: National patient safety goals for 2021. https://www.jointcommission.org/standards/national-patient-safety-goals/hospital-national-patient-safety-goals/[supanova_question]

M6 Discussion 2: WOW! Lesson Previous Next Overview The WOW discussion is

researching a topic and then detailing your findings with an argumentative three-point thesis statement. The topic is completely up M6 Discussion 2: WOW! Lesson

 

Previous Next 

Overview

The WOW discussion is an opportunity to share with the class something that surprised you in your reading, research, or study of the topics we cover in this module. As you read and watch the stories that make up our history, look for things that make you say to yourself “I didn’t know that” or “WOW! That’s cool!”. You will convert this fun fact or pertinent point into a mini-lesson on the topic and share it with your peers in this discussion.

This assignment is designed to help you develop an internal dialogue while reading and studying history. An internal dialogue while reading makes us more effective readers and efficient learners as it improves understanding and memory of story told in the text.

Instructions

WOW! Lesson

While reading the e-text, and explorations, as well as watching the video clips in this module, write down several WOW “I didn’t know that” or “That’s amazing!” facts.

Select one WOW! fact that you noted and write at least 3 critical thinking** questions about this topic. **Critical thinking questions are questions that require you to analyze information and form a judgment. Questions such as When was X born? are not critical thinking questions.

Research and find the answers to your WOW! fact questions. If you can’t find a definitive answer to a question, look for interesting related topics and list them as your answer.

Use your questions and answers to build a WOW! lesson for your classmates (as described below). This may be the only thing your classmates learn about your WOW! fact and you are the teacher, so please be thorough!

Formatting

At the top of your discussion post, state the WOW! fact (as a quote or paraphrase) followed by an in-text citation of your fact’s source. Use in-text citation (not bibliographic citation) in APA, MLA or Chicago Style format.

Write a paragraph (3 – 5 sentences in addition to your quote or paraphrased information) about why that information excited you or why you found it interesting.

Below the paragraph, list each WOW! fact question followed immediately by your researched answer of at least a paragraph in length (3 sentences minimum). Each answer should also include an in-text citation or note in APA, MLA or Chicago Style format. (Note: this is a total of at least 4 in-text citations in your post and quotations should be used minimally in your answers or not at all).

Include a bibliographic list (References, Works Cited, or Bibliography as appropriate) for all the sources you used for research. Remember these should be appropriate research resources – no tertiary sources.

Posting

Post your WOW! lesson to the discussion to share with classmates. (While your instructor reads posts and shares comments as necessary, this discussion is intended to be a student-led conversation.)

Respond to at least two classmates’ WOW assignments with two additional questions each that keep the discussion moving forward. Your responses should be both reflective and respectful as you pose your questions.

Reply to any questions asked of your WOW! thread.

E-text reading:

http://media.ccconline.org/ccco/2020Master/HIS111/eText/Sections/Section6/Page17.html

3 Peers:

Peer 1: Lilliana Garza

one thing that gave me a wow was the heian period. This period i read in the module 6 etext.  I thought was very interesting because i do not know much about buddist people or their culture. to be honest i do not know anything about them other than their name. “During the Heian period, a warrior class rose to power finally ending the control of the Fujiwaras. In 1156, a civil war broke out between the Taira clan and the Minamoto clan. Both clans relied on warriors called samurai. The samurais were similar in practice to European feudalism at roughly the same time. The samurai fought for his lord and gave him loyalty. In return, the lord gave the samurai land or payment. For a period of 20 years, a member of the Taira clan dominated the court by marrying his daughter to the emperor and becoming prime minister. The Taira clan members took control of the provinces, managed estates throughout Japan and built a fortune through trade. The Taira clan rule ended in 1180 when the Minamoto clan defeated them and their leader, Yoritomo, became shogun.” This was a big thing because they defeated their leader and was able to be free. During this period people were rising with the warrior class and  the warrior class worked really hard to defeate the leader.

Peer 2: Rosa Moran

Many years ago, I heard about how Asian women, especially Chinese and Japanese, used small shoes to stop their feet to keep growing. Well, what my ignorant mind was about to discover was a disturbing image of a deformed woman’s feet that was not even able to walk properly. My heart stopped and tears came down my cheeks. I was astonished while watching the video of a living history woman. How in the world does a woman think this is beauty? This cultural practice is called foot binding and started to be practiced by Chinese women and later in Japan when Confucianism was adopted.

What is the process of foot binding?

Food binding started typically from the age of five to eight years old. After prayers to Buddhist “Tiny-Footed Maiden Goddess” (Cartwright). The process was performed by a “professional foot binder” or family older woman who proceeded by breaking girls’ toes and foot arches, wrapping the foot with cloth (bandages) with the toes bending to the sole of the foot. After a painful month, girls’ feet would be reviewed and bandages re-adjusted. Every month the bandages would loosen and re-adjust until teenage years or even longer; the desired result was small feet of about 3 to 4 inches (Cartwright).

When did women start practicing foot binding?

Footbinding practice started in the 10th Century to 1949 in China. The Tang dynasty court dancers were known for their small feet. Dr. Amanda Foreman in her video The Ascent of Woman explores how “Confucian ideals defining feminine virtue” the foot binding was one of these ideas of feminine virtue and sign of higher social class. It is disappointing to see Japanese women as one of the few females having a starring role as rules, queens, and goddesses; as they were “the creator of Japanese culture” being confined to home (Foreman).

What were the social, religious, or cultural reasons for food binding?

In society, it was ideal for women to have small foot sizes and was perceived as a sign of sophistication. We are talking of an ancient world dominated by men and where women were at the bottom of the social class.  Katie Hunt in her CNN article argues that this was the story male figures at home would imprint on the young minds of 6 or 7-year-old girls. Girls would think that having a small foot size increases the chances of getting into a good marriage, but the intention behind was that girls were in excruciating pain that cannot walk so they would spend hours working with their hands contributing to the household economy (Hunt).

Works Cited

Cartwright, Mark. “Foot-Binding.” World History Encyclopedia, World History Encyclopedia, 5 Dec. 2021, https://www.worldhistory.org/Foot-Binding/.

Foreman, Dr. Amanda. “The Ascent of Woman, Separation, Women as the Creators of Japanese Culture.” BBC Two, BBC, https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p0319xw4.

Hunt, Katie. “Work, Not Sex? the Real Reason Chinese Women Bound Their Feet.” CNN, Cable News Network, 22 May 2017, https://www.cnn.com/2017/05/21/health/china-foot-binding-new-theory/index.html.

Peer 3: Samantha Davis

The most interesting factoid I discovered during our Module 6 research, was that the Yayoi civilization of Japan was ruled by several female shamaness, including one infamous and unmarried one named Queen Himiko. Very few ancient civilizations, and modern ones to be honest, have the open mindedness to let a female rule over them. “According to the Chinese, Himiko controlled a large part of Kyushu between the years 183 and 248 (Smitha).” She is said to be a direct descendant of the sun goddess, Amaterasu, who was one of the most important deities in the Shinto religion of ancient Japan. So she has had an immensely influential impact on the life of the Yayoi culture. 

What is Queen Himiko best known for?

Queen Himiko, is the first recorded empress of what became known as Japan. Her most important move during her rule was to build the Grand Shrine of Ise. According to records, Himiko was a daughter of the emperor Sunin. Upon his death she was given the sacred mirror of the sun goddess, Amaterasu (Mulhern). This artifact was supposedly enshrined at the shrine she built.  

Who were the other female rulers of the Yayoi people?

Legends and myths are written into the Kojiki but so are truths and history, so it makes this source difficult to decipher between the two. Legend says that Jingu was one of the most controversial leaders of early Japan. After her husband’s murder, she seeked out revenge on those her were directly involved, and then using that momentum she invaded the Korean Peninsula (Chamberlain).

How is Himiko linked to Amaterasu?

Some theories say that Himiko is the granddaughter of the sun goddess Amaterasu, but others say that Himiko is the sun goddess herself. In the Sun and the Throne the author says that neither of these theories are true, that the name Himiko itself just means “princess endowed with a spiritual power” (Kirkland).

References

Chamberlain, Basil H. The Kojiki: Records of Ancient Matters. Rutland, Vt: C.E. Tuttle Co, 1982.

Kirkland, Russell. “The Sun and the Throne. The Origins of the Royal Descent Myth in Ancient Japan.” Numen, vol. 44, no. 2, Brill, 1997, pp. 109–52.

Mulhern, Chieko J. Heroic with Grace: Legendary Women of Japan. Sharpe, 1991.

Smitha, Frank E. “The Yayoi-Japanese.” The Ancient Japanese, 2018, www.fsmitha.com/h1/ch28ja.htm.

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Document: Provider Notes Student Documentation Model Documentation Subjective Ms. Park is a

Document: Provider Notes

Student Documentation

Model Documentation

Subjective

Ms. Park is a 78 y/o Korean woman who is a/o x’s 4. she reports to the clinic stating she is having belly pain and bowel problems. she describes the as a dull crampy feeling x’s 5 days. the has gotten worse in last 2 days. pt rates pain progressing 2/10 to currently 6/10. she states having diarrhea but haven’t had a bowel movement in several days. denies nausea and vomiting, fever, blood in stool, and vaginal discharge. denies history of GI disorders in herself or family. Pt has history of gallbladder removal and a c-section in her 40’s. has control hypertension diagnosed at age 54 and takes Accupril 10mg daily.

Ms. Park reports that she is “having pain in her belly.” She has not had a bowel movement in about five days; she has not had any diarrhea since a food poisoning incident six months ago. She reports that she has been feeling some abdominal discomfort for close to a week, but the pain has increased in the past 2-3 days. She now rates her pain at 6 out of 10 and describes it as dull and crampy. She reports her pain level at the onset at 3 out of 10. She is also experiencing bloating. She did not feel her symptoms warranted a trip to the clinic, but her daughter insisted she come. She describes her symptoms primarily as generalized discomfort in the abdomen, and states that her lower abdomen is the location of the pain. She denies nausea and vomiting, blood or mucus in stool, rectal pain or bleeding, or recent fever. She denies vaginal bleeding or discharge. Reports no history of inflammatory bowel disease or GERD. Denies family history of GI disorders. Her appetite has decreased over the last few days, and she is taking small amounts of water and fluids. Previously she reported regular brown soft stools every day to every other day.

Objective

Very uncomfortable and flushes appearing elderly Korean woman sitting on the exam table grimacing at times showing signs of discomfort, HEENT: nasal & oral mucosa moist and pink ABDOMINAL: scar note on lower left quadrants and right upper quadrant that’s consisted with gallbladder removal and c-section. abdomen soft in all quadrants with an oblong mass noted on LLQ with mild guarding. liver span is 7mm. no tenderness noted. Cardio: no edema noted in lower extremities, S1 & S2 present with no adventitious sounds audible. no murmurs noted. Resp: Respirations unlabored and quiet. no accessory muscle use and able to speak in full sentences breath sounds clear to auscultation in all fields. Pelvic: no inflammation or irritation of vulva noted. no abnormal discharge or bleeding. no masses growths or tenderness upon palpation. Rectal: no hemorrhoids, fissures, or ulceration noted. good sphincter ton, fecal mass noted. Urinalysis; urine clear, dark yellow, normal odor. no nitrates, WBCs, RBCs, ketones PH 6.5, SG 1.017

• General Survey: Uncomfortable and flushed appearing elderly woman seated on exam table grimacing at times. Appears stable but mildly distressed. • HEENT: Mucus membranes are moist. Normal skin turgor; no tenting. • Cardiovascular: S1, S2, no murmurs, gallops or rubs; no S3, S4 rubs. No lower extremity edema. • Respiratory: Respirations quiet and unlabored, able to speak in full sentences. Breath sounds clear to auscultation. • Abdominal: 6 cm scar in RUQ and 10 cm scar at midline in suprapubic region. An abdominal exam reveals no discoloration; normoactive bowel sounds in all quadrants; no bruits; no friction sounds over spleen or liver; tympany presides with scattered dullness over LLQ; abdomen soft in all quadrants; an oblong mass is noted in the LLQ with mild guarding, distension; no organomegaly; no CVA tenderness; liver span 7 cm @ MCL; no hernias. • Rectal: No hemorrhoids, no fissures or ulceration; strong sphincter tone, fecal mass in rectal vault. • Pelvic: No inflammation or irritation of vulva, abnormal discharge, or bleeding; no masses, growths, or tenderness upon palpation. • Urinalysis: Urine clear, dark yellow, normal odor. No nitrites, WBCs, RBCs, or ketones detected; pH 6.5, SG 1.017.

Assessment

-constipation -bowel obstruction -diverticulitis

Mrs. Park’s bowel sounds are normoactive in all quadrants, with no bruits or friction sounds. Scattered dullness in LLQ during percussion is suggestive of feces in the colon; otherwise, her abdomen is tympanic. Her abdomen is soft to palpation; mild guarding and oblong mass suggesting feces were discovered in LLQ. No CVA tenderness; liver span 7 cm @ MCL; no splenic dullness. Digital rectal exam revealed a fecal mass in the rectal vault. No abnormalities were noted during the pelvic exam, so pelvic inflammatory disease is not suspected. Ms. Park’s urinalysis was normal, which rules out a urinary tract infection. No signs of dehydration or cardiovascular abnormalities. Mrs. Park’s symptoms and health history suggest she has constipation. Differential diagnoses are constipation, diverticulitis, and intestinal obstruction.

Plan

-consult GI for bowel obstruction -iv fluids if lab work reveals dehydration -order CBC for elevated WBC’s and electrolytes recommend increased fluids intake and fiber to diet

Mrs. Park should receive diagnostic tests to rule out differentials: CBC to assess for elevated WBCs associated with diverticulitis, electrolyte profile to evaluate electrolyte and fluid status, and a CT scan to assess for obstruction. If Mrs. Park has diverticulitis, I recommend IV fluids and bowel rest. If she has bowel obstruction, I recommend NPO, IV fluids, and general surgical consult. If she has constipation, I recommend that she increase fluids, increase fiber, and increase activity as tolerated.

The following questions below MUST be answered:

What went well in your assessment?

What did not go so well? What will you change for your next assessment?

What findings did you uncover?

What questions yielded the most information? Why do you think these were effective?

What diagnostic tests would you order based on your findings?

What differential diagnoses are you currently considering?

What patient teaching were you able to complete? What additional patient teaching is needed?

Would you prescribe any medications at this point? Why or why not? If so, what?

How did your assessment demonstrate sound critical thinking and clinical decision making?

These are the notes from the assessment that I perform on the patient off Shadow Health virtual assignment. The student documentations are my notes that I collected and the model documentation on the left is the actual full documentation. Please, please include an INTRODUCTION & CONCLUSION.[supanova_question]

Document: Provider Notes Student Documentation Model Documentation Subjective+ Mr. Frost presented to

Document: Provider Notes

Student Documentation

Model Documentation

Subjective+

Mr. Frost presented to the clinic with complaints of chest pain for the past month. Describes pain as tight and very uncomfortable. Rates pain on a scale 5/10 and pain goes away rest. Pain does not radiate to shoulder or back. Denies pain at this time. States pain last a few minutes then goes away. States its uncomfortable going up and down stairs. Denies any heartburn or indigestion. Denies any pain after he eats.

Pt. reports: “I have been having some troubling chest pain in my chest now and then for the past month.” Experiencing periodic chest pain with exertion such as yard work, as well as with overeating. Points to midsternum as location. Describes pain as “tight and uncomfortable” upon movement or exertion. Mentioned an episode upon going up the stairs to bed. Most recent episode was three days ago after eating a large restaurant dinner. Denies radiation. Pain lasts for “a few” minutes and goes away when he rests. States “It has never gotten ‘really bad'” so he didn’t think it was an emergency, but is concerned after three episodes in one month and wants his heart checked out. Last physical was 1 year ago but says he hadn’t been checked out for several years prior. His regular diet includes grilled meat, some sandwiches, and vegetables. Reports grilling between 4-5 times a week, usually red meat. Has fast food for lunch on busy days. 1-2 cups of coffee a day. Denies coughing, shortness of breath, indigestion, heartburn, jaw pain, fatigue, dizziness, weakness, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Denies chest pain at time of interview. No history of anxiety or depression.

Objective

Pt. is a 58 y/o alert and oriented x’s 3 with no acute distres noted. Cardio: S1 & S2 sounds audible with murmur noted. PMI displaced lateral. Peripheral vascular: Bruit noted to right side. Carotid pulse +3. Left carotid w/out thrill, 2+ Popliteal, tibal, and dosalis pulse without thrill, 1+ Cap refill less than 3 seconds. Resp: Auscultation lungs sounds audible bilaterally, fine crackles audible in the posterior bases of lungs bilaterally. Gastro: soft non-tender normactive bowel sound over all 4 quadrants. No audible bruit noted. Percussion reveals tympanic throughtout abdominal. Kidneys and Spleen and bilateral Kidneys nonpalpable. Liver is 7cm at the midclavicular line. Skin is dry and intact without any tenting. EKG is normal sinus rhythm w/out ST changes.

• General Survey: Alert and oriented, with clear speech. Sitting comfortably in no acute distress. • Cardiac: S1, S2, without murmurs or rubs. S3 noted at mitral area. No swelling or fluid retention present. • Peripheral Vascular: No JVD present. JVP 3 cm above sternal angle. Left carotid no bruit. Right side carotid bruit. Right carotid pulse with thrill, 3+. Brachial, radial, femoral pulses without thrill, 2+. Popliteal, tibial, and dorsalis pedis pulses without thrill, 1+. Cap refill less than 3 seconds in all 4 extremities. • Respiratory: Breathing is quiet and unlabored. Breath sounds are clear to auscultation in upper lobes and RML. Fine crackles in posterior bases of L/R lungs. • Gastrointestinal: Round, soft, non-tender with normoactive bowel sounds in all quadrants; no abdominal bruits. No tenderness to light or deep palpation. Tympanic throughout. Liver is 7 cm at the MCL and 1 cm below the right costal margin. Spleen and bilateral kidneys are not palpable. • Neuro: Alert and oriented x 3, follows commands, moves all extremities. Gross cranial nerves 2-12 bilaterally and grossly intact. • Skin: Warm, dry, pink, and intact. No tenting and no sweating. • Musculoskeletal: Moves all extremities. • Psych: Normal affect, cooperative, good eye contact. • EKG (interpretation): Regular sinus rhythm. No ST changes. • Gastrointestinal: Round, soft, non-tender with normoactive bowel sounds in 4 quadrants; no abdominal bruits. No tenderness to light or deep palpation. Tympanic throughout. Liver is 7 cm at the MCL and 1 cm below the right costal margin. Spleen and bilateral kidneys are not palpable. • Neuro: Alert and oriented x 3, follows commands, moves all extremities. • Skin: Warm, dry, pink, and intact. No tenting. • EKG (interpretation): Regular sinus rhythm. No ST changes.

Assessment

Based on the findings related to the Cardio & Resp assessment the findings includes coronary disease, stable angina, congestive heart faillure, aortic aneurysm , GERD, carotid disease, & pericarditis.

Based on the abnormal findings during cardiovascular and respiratory auscultation, my differentials include coronary artery disease with stable angina; congestive heart failure; carotid disease; aortic aneurysm; pericarditis; or GERD.

Plan

Pt will be referred to a Cardiologist for further evaluation. Pt needs a 12 lead EKG, stress test, Echo test, Chest X-Ray, Blood work that includes a Cardiac enzymes, CBC, BNP, Electrolyes, Lipid profile, and Hemoglobin A1c. The pt maybe prescribeed Lasix and a Carotid doppler maybe performed also.

Mr. Foster should receive a 12-lead ECG, chest x-ray, and lab workup (cardiac enzymes, electrolytes, CBC, BNP, CMP, Hgb A1C, lipid profile, and liver function tests) to confirm a diagnosis. He should be referred for an echocardiogram, exercise stress test, and carotid dopplers as well as a consult with a vascular surgeon for carotid evaluation. Mr. Foster should be prescribed diltiazem and a diuretic in addition to his daily lisinopril and atorvastatin. If needed, add an ACE inhibitor to manage his hypertension and PRN nitroglycerin for chest pain that does not subside with rest.

The following questions below MUST be answered:

What went well in your assessment?

What did not go so well? What will you change for your next assessment?

What findings did you uncover?

What questions yielded the most information? Why do you think these were effective?

What diagnostic tests would you order based on your findings?

What differential diagnoses are you currently considering?

What patient teaching were you able to complete? What additional patient teaching is needed?

Would you prescribe any medications at this point? Why or why not? If so, what?

How did your assessment demonstrate sound critical thinking and clinical decision making?

These are the notes from the assessment that I perform on the patient off Shadow Health virtual assignment. The student documentations are my notes that I collected and the model documentation on the left is the actual full documentation. Please, please include an INTRODUCTION & CONCLUSION.[supanova_question]

Jhoana Reyes-Cruz Mr. Patrick English 90 07-19-21 Studying Abroad “Freedom” is what

Jhoana Reyes-Cruz

Mr. Patrick

English 90

07-19-21

Studying Abroad

“Freedom” is what I think of when I describe what a growth mindset is: the freedom to embrace challenges, to build abilities, to accept criticism and to have the desire to learn. People with a growth mindset embrace flaws and mistakes as opportunities for growth; they learn that setbacks are acceptable and part of the learning process. In contrast, “restricting” is what I think of when describing a fixed mindset. People with this mindset are threatened by other’s success, and they have a desire to look smart without making the effort to succeed. People with a fixed mindset often give up easily and are unmotivated to achieve their goals.

In Carol Dweck’s article “Brainology,” she discusses the differences between growth and fixed mindsets. She claims that people with a growth mindset have a “very straightforward (and correct) idea that the harder you work, the more ability will grow and that even geniuses have had to work hard for their accomplishments.” Dweck explains, however, that those with a fixed mindset believe “that if you worked hard it meant that you didn’t have ability, and that things would just come naturally to you if you did.” Reading Carol Dweck’s article made me reflect on my own learning experiences, especially how I changed a fixed mindset to a growth mindset when studying abroad for three years in high school.

I have never been a good student; I would often forget everything I had just read or become confused about things most children would say were “easy.” This would make me feel embarrassed and “dumb.” Throughout my early academic years, I believe I always had a fixed mindset. It was not until high school that I faced one of the biggest challenges of my life. I overcame many obstacles during those years, which made me realize that I can accomplish anything if I maintain a growth mindset.

In the summer of 2014, I was about to enter my freshman year of high school. I was excited to start a new chapter in my life after a not-so-pleasant time in middle school. My mother had just bought my school supplies when she received a call from one of her friends in Mexico. She told my mother that her parents’ (my grandparents) health had been poorly and that they needed assistance. My mother did not know what to do. Family has always been one of the most important things to me, so when I heard my grandparents needed help, I told my mother I could move for a some time until they were feeling better. Initially, she said no. It took a lot of convincing, but finally, before the school year began, my parents agreed to me moving to help my grandparents. As much as I wanted to help, I knew this was a difficult decision, leaving behind my parents and siblings for what turned out to be the next three years.

Arriving in Mexico, I was greeted with the warmest and friendliest welcome. I saw for the first time my aunties and cousins, people whom I had only known through FaceTime. Finally, I was able to meet them in person. I remember the three-hour drive from the airport to my grandparents’ ranch everywhere I looked there was street vendors and live bands playing everywhere. Once we arrived, and when I made it through the front door, I was hit with the aroma of chocolate and chiles – ingredients often found in all types of mole (a common Oaxaca dish). In the kitchen, I saw the petite, fierce form of my abuelita (grandma). I hugged her so tightly. I felt the warmth and love in that one embrace. I was finally with the woman my mother would talk so fondly about. Then my grandpa entered, and he was just as happy to see me. We ate, talked and laughed. They asked me what the United States (US) was like and how my mother was. We spent hours exchanging pictures and sharing memories. They made fun of me speaking English because, to them, it sounded funny. Everything was new to them. As it grew late, I headed for bed. After saying goodnight to everyone, my grandma showed me to my room. As I was getting ready for bed, all I could think of is what school would be like the following day.

The next morning, I dressed in my school uniform, and my grandma walked me to school, only 10 minutes away. We were required to show our identification before entering the school. The uniform had to be neatly ironed, and hair had to be styled a certain way. If the students did not follow these rules, they were not allowed in the school. Those rules were the first things that took a lot of getting used to. As I made my way through the day, I noticed they had completely different teaching strategies from those in the US regarding how they to solve equations and formulas in math and science. Learning how to write in Spanish and using the correct punctuation was a struggle. Assignments were marked down if our handwriting was not pristine. Studying all night meant that I woke up late for school almost every day. The first year of high school was the worst year for me; I failed half my classes, barely passing the year. I knew I needed to change the situation I was in if I wanted to accomplish my goals. In Dwecks article she claims “Students with different mindsets also had very different reactions to setbacks. Those with growth mindsets reported that, after a setback in school, they would simply study more or study differently the next time. But those with fixed mindsets were more likely to say that they would feel dumb, study less the next time, and seriously consider cheating”. I took this setback from school as a learning experience to improve my grades next year. It was my first year of high school in a different country, so I felt it was ok if I failed; I had at least learned something new, and I knew that learning from my mistakes would eventually help me succeed.

Going into my sophomore year, I decided to take school more seriously. The first couple of months were difficult. The subjects I struggled with the most were math, science and technology. I started to ask my teachers for help, and I asked more questions and stayed after school to receive additional help. As my confidence grew, my grades improved. I was able to understand math more clearly. I understood how points, parallel lines, trigonometry, quadrilaterals etc. worked. In science, the introduction to acids and bases, reaction rates and chemical energy began to make sense. Finally, in technology I learned the process of designing and engineering, as well as hardware and software design. As I started to understand my classes more, I realized the teaching methods and the details of notation might be different from the US, but the theorems, processes, algorithms and functions were the same. I felt my junior year went more smoothly because I had a routine. I went to school, cared for my grandparents and worked part-time in a restaurant as a waitress. I learned to balance all these elements while keeping my grades high. I created a bond with all my teachers and the students there. I finally felt I understood the learning materials being taught.

Unfortunately, my time in Mexico ended with tragedy; my auntie and cousin were murdered by my own cousin, after I just left their home. If I had stayed longer, I do not think I would be here today. My mother thought it no longer safe for me to stay there and wanted me to come home. After my auntie and cousin’s funeral, I said goodbye to the rest of my family. My grandma dropped me off at the airport, we said our final goodbye and I went back to the US.

Coming home, I felt different, and the sudden loss of my family members affected me mentally. I tried to take my mind off such thoughts to focus on the upcoming school year. I learned many things during my time in Mexico. I learned more about my culture, and I improved my Spanish and my writing. I improved in many subjects with the help and support system around me. For my senior year, I approached it with the same level of confidence I had during my junior year. I never imagined it would be so difficult, but after studying for three years in Mexico and only speaking Spanish, my senior year was another learning experience, but I used the same tactics as I had for the previous three years. I frequently asked my teachers questions, and I put all my effort into learning. I accepted my teachers’ feedback as a source of information to improve in the areas I needed to. I recovered the knowledge I learned when I was studying in the US. I achieved good grades throughout my senior year, so by the time I reached the last semester, I was only coming in for three classes because I had reached the GPA requirements to graduate, helped by my extra credit work and the classes I did in Mexico. On June 12th, 2019, I graduated high school. All the long hours of studying and hard work paid off. I was the first person from my family to graduate.

Dweck claims “It is through effort that people build their abilities and realize their potential.” My effort in helping my grandparents, work and school made me realize my abilities and potential I was proud of my achievements. I learned how to overcome a fixed mindset during high school after having that type of mindset my whole life. With the help of a growth mindset I was able to embrace and overcome challenges, and to view other students work and success as sources of inspiration.[supanova_question]

researching a topic and then detailing your findings with an argumentative three-point thesis statement. The topic is completely up

researching a topic and then detailing your findings with an argumentative three-point thesis statement. The topic is completely up