Count Dracula’s origins are found in Eastern Europe–a marginalized, liminal, obscure, blank space on the map, which is, from

Count Dracula’s origins are found in Eastern Europe–a marginalized, liminal, obscure, blank space on the map, which is, from. Count Dracula’s origins are found in Eastern Europe–a marginalized, liminal, obscure, blank space on the map, which is, from.

Count Dracula’s origins are found in Eastern Europe–a marginalized, liminal, obscure, blank space on the map, which is, from the dominant White English perspective, associated with darkness, darkness, undesirable ethnic traits, and the practice of religious superstitions (again, from the Protestant English perspective on Roman Catholicism). Like Victor Frankenstein’s nameless Monster, Dracula is violent and bent on revenge.

In a well-constructed and typo-free essay (1000 words max), describe and discuss Dracula as a repository of English cultural anxiety about otherness, which is represented in the novel variously as deformity, monstrosity, criminality, and racial, ethnic, and gender and sexual difference. The best essays will draw upon the text of the novel as well as the contextualizing materials found in the Appendices in the Broadview edition. Your essay must be entirely your own work: no references to or use of outside works (except the Appendices) will be permitted.[supanova_question]

YOU CAN USE THIS TO MAKE SURE ALL INFORMATION IS INCLUDED Research

YOU CAN USE THIS TO MAKE SURE ALL INFORMATION IS INCLUDED

Research Question:

SUBJECTS

Number of Subjects (n=)

Why this number of subjects/participants?

Age Range

Gender percentages

Ethnicity (if relevant)

Disease/Disability/Diagnosis

Inclusion Criteria

Exclusion Criteria

Summary of Justifications

Introduction/Background

Population/Diagnosis

Description of the Problem

Literature Review and Significance to Occupational Therapy/Performance

Summary of Justifications

Background / Purpose through Hypothesis/es

Purpose Statement

Your Hypotheses: Null and Alternative

Hypothesis: Justification of Directional vs. Non-Directional

Summary of Justifications

Research Design: General

Justification of Study Type (Experimental or Quasi-experimental only)

Details and Justification: Sampling / Participant recruitment technique

Sample Assignment technique (control vs. exp)

Length of study and time,  frequency of observations

Outcome Measures

Research Design: Methods

Number and Types of Groups

Intervention Investigated 

Location of Intervention

Who administers the intervention

Intervention training required? (Fidelity)

Intervention dose: frequency and total length 

CONTROL/Comparison

Brief description of control / comparison intervention

Location of Control / comparison Intervention

Who administered control / comparison intervention?

Training required to provide control / comparison intervention?

Control /comparison Dose

Summary of the Justifications

Analysis Methods

Type of data analysed (Nominal, Ordinal, Interval, Ratio; Quotes, Media, etc.) Explain why

Type of Analysis used

Statistical Tests also include cut-off values [alpha, etc.] probabilities and effect size tests

Summary of Justifications

References:[supanova_question]

Count Dracula’s origins are found in Eastern Europe–a marginalized, liminal, obscure, blank space on the map, which is, from

Count Dracula’s origins are found in Eastern Europe–a marginalized, liminal, obscure, blank space on the map, which is, from

Your final paper should take a position on the credibility of your chosen narrative and explore the various research

Your final paper should take a position on the credibility of your chosen narrative and explore the various research. Your final paper should take a position on the credibility of your chosen narrative and explore the various research.

Your final paper should take a position on the credibility of your chosen narrative and explore the various
research surrounding it, determining why you think it still maintains its relevance and how its proponents
use rhetoric to argue for its credibility, select and integrate sources, and develop an original persuasive
argument using MLA style and documentation.
Your research essay may take one of three forms (or you could explore some other concept in your
chosen texts as long as you include research to reinforce your claims):
1). A comparison of two primary texts and multiple variants (if necessary) (urban legend, rumor, fairy
tale, etc.) where you use sources to make an argument for how your texts comment on contemporary
society, accounting for Kairos, ethos, logos, and pathos. Thus, your thesis could resemble this one: “The
Vanishing Hitchhiker” is still effective in commenting on contemporary society because it focuses on
anxieties related to growing up in America, such as conformity, conservatism, and individualism.
2). An examination of two primary texts and multiple variants (urban legend, rumor, fairy tale, etc.)
where you use sources to make an argument for which text has evolved the most to account for societal
change. Thus, your thesis could resemble this one: “Little Red Riding Hood” and “The Dead Cat in the
Package” comment on American culture in various ways, exploring societal fears, expectations, and
norms; however, “Little Red Riding Hood” has been more fluid in how it provides possible solutions and
suggestions for societal problems.
3). A comparison of two stories (and their variants, if applicable) we have examined this semester in
which you discuss the similarities and differences between the two — possible similarities and differences
could include: moral, theme, lesson, character archetypes, etc., as well as how they incorporate ethos,
logos, and pathos. Thus, your thesis could resemble this one: On the surface, “The Kentucky Fried Rat”
and “The Bear From Arkansas” may appear different, but each is similar in how they include a morale
that cautions against certain behaviors, a theme that remains relevant, and an analysis of specific character
types that seem timeless.
Components
1. Outline (Optional)
1.1 This detailed formal outline will help organize the main points of your paper.
1.2 Include your personal thesis.
1.3 Consider the main points you will make. How would you arrange them to make a logical
argument?
1.4 What subpoints will you make within each point?
Your paper will consist of these parts:
2. Body of the paper (6-8 pages)
2.1 Expand upon your main points and subpoints.
2.2 Consider the various techniques of summary, evaluation, analysis, and synthesis.
2.3 You must use one direct quote per paragraph. You have to cite them in MLA using both
internal citation and signal phrases to get full credit.
2.4 If you are paraphrasing, you must also include internal citation. I need to know where you got
your information. Remember numbers are not common knowledge.
2.4 Include a final References page for the sources you cite in your paper.
2
3. References
4.1 MLA style
4.2 Please include only the specific sources you cite in your paper.
4.3 You will lose a significant number of points if you do not include a Works Cited Page on a
separate page.

Evaluation
300 points total:
 Rough Draft (11/19)
 Final 6-8 page research paper: (12/1 – Midnight)
Getting Started
Consider the following questions before/as you draft:
 What, exactly, is the issue or controversy/folk narrative you are researching?
 Which type of text are you going to examine?
 Are you going to examine two completely different texts or variants of one text?
 What background does your audience need to know to understand the complexity of the issue or
accept your viewpoint?
 How can you hook the audience?
 What is the specific argument (thesis) you make in response to the issue?
 How can you break down the issue/present your viewpoint in logical points?
 What other perspectives on the issue inform and influence your research?
 How do these other perspectives interact with one another? How can you turn their arguments into a
conversation in your research paper?
 What conclusion can you make or solution can you propose as a result of your argument?[supanova_question]

PSY7610 PSY7610 Tests by Type Test or Instrument Combined Review Allowed? Publisher

PSY7610

PSY7610

Tests by Type

Test or Instrument

Combined Review Allowed?

Publisher

Intelligence / Cognitive Abilities

Comprehensive Test of Nonverbal Intelligence – Second Edition (CTONI-2)*

Yes, with CTONI

WPS

Differential Ability Scales – II (DAS-II)

NO

Pearson

Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children

– Second Edition (KABC-II)

NO

Pearson

Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scales – Fifth Edition (SB5)

NO

PRO-ED

Test of Nonverbal Intelligence – Fourth Edition (TONI-4)

NO

PRO-ED

Universal Nonverbal Intelligence Test – Second Edition (UNIT2)*

Yes, with UNIT

PROED

Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale – Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV)

NO

Pearson

Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children – Fifth Edition (WISC-V)

Yes, with WISC-IV

Pearson

Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence – Fourth Edition (WPPSI-IV)

NO

Pearson

Woodcock-Johnson Tests of Cognitive Abilities – Fourth Edition (WJIV:COG)*

Yes, with WJIII

Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

Achievement

/ Aptitude

Graduate Record Examinations (GRE)

NO

ETS

Kaufman Test of Educational Achievement

– Third Edition (KTEA-3)*

Yes, with KTEA-2

Pearson

Miller Analogies Test (MAT)

NO

Pearson

Wechsler Individual Achievement Test – Third Edition (WIAT-III)

NO

Pearson

Wide Range Achievement Test – Fourth Edition (WRAT4)

NO

Pearson

Woodcock Reading Mastery Tests – Third Edition (WRMT-III)

NO

Pearson

Test or Instrument

Combined Review Allowed?

Publisher

Woodcock-Johnson Tests of Achievement

– Fourth Edition (WJIV:ACH)*

Yes, with WJIII

Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

Personality

16PF – Fifth Edition (16PF 5)

NO

IPAT

Millon Adolescent Personality Inventory (MAPI)

NO

Pearson

Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory – IV (MCMI-IV)*

Yes, MCMI-III

Pearson

Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory – 2 (MMPI-2)*

Yes, MMPI-2-RF

Pearson

Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory – Adolescent (MMPI-A)*

Yes, MMPI-A-RF

Pearson

NEO Personality Inventory – 4 (NEO-4)*

Yes, NEO-3

PAR

Personality Inventory for Children – Second Edition (PIC-2)

NO

WPS

Behavior

Achenbach System of Empirically Based Assessment (ASEBA) – any forms or age range

NO

ASEBA

Behavior Assessment System for Children

– 3 (BASC-3)*

Yes, BASC-2

Pearson

Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF)

– any forms or age range

NO

PAR

Conners 3

NO

Multi- Health Systems

Conners Comprehensive Behavior Rating Scales (CBRS)

NO

Multi- Health Systems

Adaptive Behavior

Adaptive Behavior Assessment System – 3 (ABAS-3)

Yes, ABAS-2

WPS

Scales of Independent Behavior – Revised (SIB-R)

NO

Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

Test or Instrument

Combined Review Allowed?

Publisher

Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales – 3 (VABS-3)*

Yes, VABS-II

Pearson

Neuropsych ological

Dean Woodcock Neuropsychological Battery (DWNB)

NO

Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

Halstead Reitan Neuropsychological Battery (HRNB)

NO

Neuropsy chology Center

Luria-Nebraska Neuropsychological Battery II (LNNB-2)*

Yes, LNNB

WPS

NEPSY – Second Edition (NEPSY-II)

NO

Pearson

Neuropsychological Assessment Battery (NAB)

NO

PAR

Careers/Busi ness/Organiz ations

Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB)

NO

USMEPC OM

California Psychological Inventory – (CPI)

NO

CPP

Campbell Interest and Skill Survey (CISS)

NO

Pearson

Fundamental Interpersonal Relations Orientation – Behavior (FIRO-B)

NO

Myers-Briggs Co.

Hogan Personality Inventory (HPI)

NO

Hogan Assessme nts

Strong Interest Inventory (SII)

NO

CPP

Thomas-Kilmann Conflict Mode Instrument (TKI)

NO

CPP

Wonderlic Personnel Test – Revised (WPT- R)

Yes, WPT

Wonderlic

Autism

Autism Spectrum Rating Scales (ASRS)

NO

Multi- Health Systems

Checklist for Autism Spectrum Disorder (CASD)

NO

Stoelting

Childhood Autism Rating Scale – Second Edition (CARS- 2)

NO

WPS

Test or Instrument

Combined Review Allowed?

Publisher

Gilliam Autism Rating Scale – Third Edition (GARS-3)

Yes, GARS-2

PROED

Depression

Beck Depression Inventory – II (BDI-II)

NO

Pearson

Beck Hopelessness Scale – Revised (BHS- R)*

Yes, BHS

Pearson

Children’s Depression Inventory – 2 (CDI2)

NO

Multi- Health Systems

Preschool

Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development – III (Bayley-III)

NO

Pearson

Brigance Inventory of Early Development – III (BRIGANCE IED-III)*

Yes, BRIGANCE IED-2

Curriculum Associates

Behavior Analytic Assessments

Verbal Behavior Milestone Assessment and placement Program (VBMAPP)

Assessment of Basic Language and Learning Skills, Revised (ABLLS-R)

Assessment of Functional Living Skills

Questions About Behavior Function (QABF)

Motivation Assessment Scale (MAS)

Performance Diagnostic Checklist

NO

NO

NO

NO

NO

NO

AVB Press

Different Roads to Learning

Behavior Analysts, Inc.

Matson & Vollmer, 1995

Monaco & Associates, Inc.

Austin, 2000

* Tests may be frequently revised. In those cases, and depending on when you are researching a particular test, it may be difficult to locate sufficient articles on the latest version of your test. If needed, you may complete your review of the test by combining research on the current version with the previous one. See the second column for those tests and their allowed previous version for your research.

1

1[supanova_question]

Can Leadership Be Taught? Robert P. Vecchio Remarks delivered at Meeting of

Your final paper should take a position on the credibility of your chosen narrative and explore the various research Can Leadership Be Taught?

Robert P. Vecchio

Remarks delivered at Meeting of Southern Management Association, San Antonio, Texas, November 5, 2004

The question under consideration by this symposium is an important one. It rests, arguably, at the heart of management education. A broader restatement of the question might be: Do we teach much that is of real value in schools of business? To be sure, there is a widespread perception that what we offer in business school curricula is of some value (just look at our enrollment numbers!). Although one sometimes hears people praise the merits of graduating from the “school of hard knocks,” I vividly recall a conference that brought together highly successful entrepreneurs from across the nation, many of whom had very limited formal education, even a limited initial ability to speak English. I asked each entrepreneur if he or she would ultimately desire to someday complete an MBA degree at a university. They all said “yes,” indicating that there was still much that they felt they could learn through exposure to formal business education. So even successful graduates of the “real-world” acknowledge that if the opportunity were available, they would pursue further knowledge of the type that we offer in our degree-granting programs. My sense is that their various contacts with more “knowledgeable” (more formally trained) managers created a sense of personal deficiency that they would like to have corrected.

As for the narrower question of whether we can actually teach leadership, I must mention that I often begin my leadership classes each semester by raising this very question. I point out that I (like other instructors) offer no warranties (written or implied) and that they will surely be “exposed” to educational content, but whether the course experience affects their subsequent behavior and success will be heavily influenced by other factors. If they become great leaders, it may not be because of what the course provides, as much as it is in spite of what the course provides to them (i.e., it is conceivable they may gain insights and understandings of other perspectives that lead them to be even less certain when adopting a course of action , and thereby less effective as a consequences of “over-analysis” of situations) Certainly, they should have, at minimum, deeper insights on social dynamics at work and greater self-awareness after exposure to a leadership course.

The question of whether one can be taught to be a great or effective leader is a deceptive one. It seems that a simple dichotomous, yes/no, type of answer should exist. However, consider that we could also ask whether one can be taught to be a great swimmer or a great football wide-receiver. On deeper reflection, we would have to admit that it is really a matter of degree; that greatness/effectiveness is not definable in simple yes/no terms, but only in terms of gradations. Moreover, on still deeper reflection, we realize that there are separate performance dimensions that underlie greatness/effectiveness. So, a prospective wide-receiver may be very capable in terms of flat-out speed but lack needed strength for overcoming one-on-one blocking contact or lack needed coordination and dexterity to catch a pass while running at full speed. So too, a leader may have strong communication skills but lack detailed knowledge of the work at hand (and thereby lose credibility with followers who may know substantially more about the tasks they perform) or lack the ability to envision the future (and thereby fail to identify emerging threats and opportunities). Therefore, a person who aspires to be a leader must recognize the multidimensional nature of the role and the need for appraisal on each dimension. Furthermore, some dimensions are more critical than others, depending heavily on the context (unique character of circumstances). Exogenous factors can also undermine leaders. For example, consider one of my favorite quotes, “A person can do everything right, and do absolutely nothing wrong, and still fail!”

Subordinates, as part of the context, can also limit the effectiveness of a would-be leader in that they can withhold their support. Mutual dependency operates in leadership settings such that a person who appears to “have it all” on the dimensions that are seemingly critical for effectiveness in a given setting, may be undermined by subordinates who withhold their acceptance of that person. Moreover, followers are not uniform in their views, and followers are likely to vary in how accepting or supportive they are of a leader. With a sufficient cadre of loyal supporters, a leader may yet be effective. But without some minimal subgroup of key supporters, a leader cannot be effective.

While leadership can be viewed very broadly, we are most interested in the topic of managerial leadership (as distinct from political leadership, military leadership, sports leadership, etc.). Typically, we try to teach the major management functions, among which leadership is often listed and actually covered last (after planning, organizing, controlling, and staffing).

Perhaps it is often treated last because it is the murkiest of the management functions and does not lend itself to a summary list of “dos and don’ts.” Fundamentally, education is essentially about “knowledge acquisition.” For the topic of leadership, there is a “body of knowledge” that can be taught (consider the Handbook of Leadership as a useful compendium and starting point). There is also a “growing archive of research” (generated as a result of the scientific enterprise) that we can teach in terms of “how to contribute to it” by teaching research techniques and critical thinking skills. But it is the application of knowledge that is surely the tricky part. (Interestingly, we do not often ask instructors in, e.g., statistics or economics courses to demonstrate that their students will successfully apply what they have learned in class at a later point in a managerial career.) Unfortunately, we are still some distance away from developing a “science of leader development” (Day & Zaccaro, 2004).

In a review of the empirical evidence, Bass (1990, p. 856) concluded that available evaluative studies have provided evidence that leadership and management training, education, and development are usually effective.” One might more cautiously state that such experiences generally appear to add value.” However, a close examination of the relevant evidence shows that many studies rely on subjective criteria (such as participant satisfaction) to appraise the impact of developmental/training exercises. Also, a number of studies focus on demonstrating that participants gain in knowledge and its application relative to fairly narrow notions of leadership that are specified by certain models (e.g., Fiedler’s Leader Match, the Vroom-Yetton Model, Hersey and Blanchard’s Situational Leadership Theory, McCelland’s achievement-motive imagery, etc.). On closer inspection, these criteria are not what we often envision when asking whether leadership can be taught. Furthermore, the training that is provided in undergraduate and MBA curricula may be very much in demand, by all economic indicators. Yet, my sense is that business schools do a far better job of teaching decision making, rather than decision implementation (i.e., we instruct, quite well, on how to calculate the Net Present Value of various courses of action and the selection of an appropriate statistical test; but we instruct less well, I believe, in how to build consensus, create and share a vision, or motivate others to pursue a course of action). Experience in the role of leader, or observing others in that role, is particularly valuable for understanding how to be successful in decision implementation.

In the realm of leadership education, I am impressed by three perspectives. These three perspectives relate to that portion of unexplained variance in leader effectiveness that remains after controlling for individual innate/trait propensities to be flexible, socially engaged, confident, etc. The first perspective is the cyclical notion of individualized assessment and learning. This involves the three steps of initially identifying individual strengths/weaknesses relative to a particular leadership role; then, designing developmental experiences that target deficiencies and maintain strengths (e.g., public speaking coupled with feedback, role-playing, and job-relevant training on the specifics of a task); and finally, re-appraisal and feedback. Unfortunately, this type of individualized assessment and learning, which identifies and targets relevant “gaps,” is very labor-intensive (and especially not amenable to classes of 40-70 students, as are often found in university leadership courses). Moreover, this type of developmental exercise cannot be conducted even in small classes if we do not have a specific job in mind that we are targeting for individual appraisal. However, it worth noting that the practice of “executive coaching” does, in fact, frequently follow this three-step process. Also, one can argue that “mentoring” implicitly incorporates this three-step process as well.

The second perspective that I find impressive is that of observational learning. Some might call it role-taking or mimicry. Yet, many people engage in this activity (often unconsciously) in that they have role models or exemplars whose style they, in fact, imitate. Because one’s experiences are, often limited to a certain range of people and settings, educators can try to broaden students’ exposure to the range of styles that exist, thereby creating in students the useful sense that “I can do that,” or “I can conduct myself like that.” Beyond videos, structured simulation is another powerful tool for providing opportunities for active rehearsal and confidence-building.

The third perspective might be termed self-education. We can foster self-education (which includes experiences beyond the classroom) by emphasizing the continuing character of life-long education. Two pillars of self-education are self-managed ability and motivation. These constructs are compensatory, to a degree. However, the absence of either is fatal, while the presence of both in ample amounts can greatly enhance the likelihood of a leader’s effectiveness.

But what should a person have as goals in terms of developing cross-situational abilities and motivation? Although it may seem overly broad in light of my earlier remarks, three often-cited critical dimensions of effectiveness that can be manifested by virtually anyone in a leader role are: knowing what one is talking about, being honest in dealings with others, and caring about the welfare of others (see Holtz & Mackay, 1999). “Knowing what one is talking about” is basic for possessing credibility with respect to followers and is a learnable skill. It requires (as Rudy Giuliani terms it in his 2003 book, Leadership) “relentless preparation”-a devotion to understanding as much as, if not more than, others know about the task at hand. Oddly, nearly all of our models of leadership omit this notion (perhaps because it is assumed to be self-evidently valid). “Honesty” is also an essential element of effectiveness, and the failure to maintain this standard can easily undermine any leader. And finally, “caring” is critical in that anything less than genuine concern for others will likely lead to a cynical interpretation of a leader’s motives and actions. This cynicism, in turn, will have adverse consequences for follower loyalty and trust. Caring/concern for others, however, can often emerge as a result of circumstances that involve “mutual shared fate” (i.e., “we are all in this together”). Those leaders who do not foster this sense of mutual dependency or sense of shared fate in themselves as well as their followers, risk failure on this critical dimension.

So, bottom line: Can we teach leadership? The answer, like many answers in the realm of social relations, is both “yes,” for certain aspects of leadership (such as an appreciation of obstacles to effectiveness, an awareness of different role models, greater self-awareness, and knowledge of frameworks for understanding/interpreting social influence processes); and “no,” for certain aspects of leadership that are more situation-specific (such as whether to undertake a personal “makeover,” to challenge one’s own supervisors, or to join Toast-Masters). Traditionally, leadership has been analyzed in more general terms, such as personal style or demeanor of nominal head, while the specifics of how a leader can influence others to achieve desired goals have not been treated in sufficient detail. The development of leader competencies (in the areas of cognitive and social skills), as well as the awareness of political/power realities, can provide a useful approach for more directly addressing these specifics.

References

Bass, B.M.(1990). Bass and Stogdill’s Handbook of Leadership. New York: Free Press.

Day, D.V. and Zaccaro, S. J, (2004). Toward a science of leader development. In D. V. Day, S.J. Zaccaro, and

S. M. Halpin (eds.). Leader Development for Transforming Organizations. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.

Giuliani, R. W. (2003). Leadership. New York: Miramax .

Holtz, L. and Mackay, H. (1999). Winning Every Day: The Game Plan for Success. New York . Harper Business.[supanova_question]

Name:______________________ Listening Log #6 Music in America Title Composer Type of Piece

Name:______________________

Listening Log #6

Music in America

Title

Composer

Type of Piece

Instruments

Characteristics

Comments

Oh, Susanna!

Stephen Foster

Maple Leaf Rag

Scott Joplin

If You Ever Been Down Blues

Sippie Wallace

Hoochie Coochie Man

Muddy Waters

Atomic Boogie

Pete Johnson

Conga Brava

Duke Ellington

Rhapsody in Blue

George Gershwin

Out of Nowhere

Charlie Parker and Miles Davis

Bitches Brew

Miles Davis

West Side Story

Leonard Bernstein[supanova_question]

Your final paper should take a position on the credibility of your chosen narrative and explore the various research

Your final paper should take a position on the credibility of your chosen narrative and explore the various research

• The anthology needs to have a specific theme, for example, “Obsession in the Short Stories of Julio Cortázar.”

• The anthology needs to have a specific theme, for example, “Obsession in the Short Stories of Julio Cortázar.”. • The anthology needs to have a specific theme, for example, “Obsession in the Short Stories of Julio Cortázar.”.

• The anthology needs to have a specific theme, for example, “Obsession in the Short Stories of Julio Cortázar.”
• Before you complete the anthology, you need to read some literature outside of class:
15-18 poems
7-8 short stories
4-5 dramas
5-7 essays
OR a combination of 10-15 works
• You will complete a chart with information about ALL of the literature read for this project, whether you use it in the anthology or not.
• The introduction to the anthology needs to be 2-4 pages. In the introduction, you need to define terms and introduce authors (for example: What is obsession? Who is Julio Cortázar and why is he important?). You also need to explain why you have included the chosen literature for your anthology: Why did you choose the literature that you chose? What value does it have? How does it fit in the theme of your anthology?
• The anthology needs to include at least:
8-10 poems
5-6 short stories
3-4 dramas
4-5 essays
OR a combination of the works
• Scanned first pages of the literature included in the anthology
• Works Cited page
• Appendix with a table with information about the literature read and scanned first pages of the literature NOT included in the anthology.
[supanova_question]

Please review your syllabus for the assignment instructions and then submit your

Please review your syllabus for the assignment instructions and then submit your work on canvas.

Topic for Reaction Paper 1:

In beginning this course what is your current understanding and knowledge of diversity?

How would you define diversity?

What are your views on the various aspects of culture?

How culturally encapsulated or de-capsulated are you? Your family? 

The essay should be divided into three sections; Reflective Questions, Reflection through Literature Review, and Application to Clinical Practice.

 

Instructions:

Purpose:
Reaction Papers have a three-part purpose. First, they are intended to demonstrate your analysis of the course readings, news reports, or other media pertaining to the current topics as presented in the syllabus. Self-awareness of your own culture is the starting point of developing your cultural competence. Self-awareness is also the foundation of empathy and the cognitive complexity required to tolerate ambiguity and conduct therapy, especially culturally sensitive and appropriate therapy. Most importantly, they are intended for you to give your reaction to the course materials.

Format:
Papers must be double-spaced, at least one page in length, and no more than two pages of text (250-500 words). It must have a title page that includes your name, page numbering, and consistent use of APA style, including references. Make sure that your paper is in the form of an essay with an introduction, body and conclusion.

Procedure:
Your Reaction Paper should demonstrate comprehension and analysis of the journal articles provided by the instructor or available on e-Reserve, to news reports in newspapers, popular magazines, or other media, and contain a critical and thoughtful reaction to the reading. Your reaction should make up the majority of the Reaction Paper. There are a number of ways you might approach the task:

Focus on an aspect of the reading/media that you will argue pertains to some issue or idea presented in class or found in the text readings. Does the reading support, undermine or come into tension with previous issues or concepts? Explain why it is significant.

Focus on a particular theme or issue raised by the reading and give your own perspective on it. Be sure to elaborate on your opinion. What is your thinking based on? What are the strengths and the weaknesses of the main sides of the issue, as you see it? Do you have any personal experience that is relevant to the issue?

Contribute at least 2 external resources (journal articles) that are relevant to the discussion.

Grading:

Each reaction paper is worth a maximum of 10 points. In order to receive maximum points, please make sure that the paper is free of grammatical errors, and includes a title page, and APA-formatted reference page.

Reaction paper grading criteria

A careful and critical assessment

1 point

Organized and detailed response

1 point

APA references and citations

1 point

Use 2 new journal resources published within the last 5 years

2 points

Total

5 (possible) x 2 per assignment[supanova_question]

6-2 Short Paper: Implementing Change Assignment Think of a specific change you

• The anthology needs to have a specific theme, for example, “Obsession in the Short Stories of Julio Cortázar.” 6-2 Short Paper: Implementing Change

Assignment

Think of a specific change you would like to bring to your organization. Describe the change, the value that you believe the change would bring to the organization, and the methodology that you would use (top-down or bottom-up) in order to implement the change.

For additional details, refer to the Short Paper Rubric document.[supanova_question]

Nursing Research Management There are more than 150,000 nurse practitioners in the

Nursing Research Management 

There are more than 150,000 nurse practitioners in the United States, and many more continue to be produced yearly (Nikpour & Broome,2021). According to Nikpour & Broome (2021), advanced practice registered practitioners are well-educated until the master and doctoral levels. These nurses can conduct an assessment and provide medical assistance for a wide variety of problems, including substance abuse problems. An umbrella problem that opioid abuse is categorized. Based on Shearer et al. (2019), nurses can prescribe medications and help in the treatment of people with opioid use disorders (see appendix A). In addition, certified nurses can prescribe Suboxone to their patients. Suboxone is used to treat people with opioid use related disorders. Similarly, health practitioners, especially nurses who are always close to the patients, can help eradicate the opioid abuse problem via new forms of technology used in healthcare.

For instance, using telehealth, nurses can communicate with patients who are in remote areas and guide them in a manner so they can reduce dependence on an opioid. According to Salmond & Allread (2019), opioid use disorder training in primary care, which can be aimed at sensitizing people on the dangers of overuse and overdose on an opioid, can be conducted by nursing practitioners. Health center programs facilitated by health resource and service administration provide intensive training and enhanced assistance to emerging and present health center supporters countrywide (Salmond & Allread, 2019). Also, patient-centered addiction treatment services could assist nurses in communicating and guide OUD patients on how to go about their disorder. Support is also granted to spread awareness on the effects of opioid use and the practical solutions to help opioid users.

Furthermore, the human nursing resource could help combat the opioid use menace by enhancing the manner of opioid prescriptions to patients. Ensuring that clinical guidelines are adhered to during medicinal prescription reduces the harm that opioid drugs can have on a patient (Salmond, 2019). As a result, patients can have access to safe and more efficient treatment of persistent pain, whereas lowering the chances of overdose or even death resulting from poor opioid use. The Center for Disease Control (CDC) has formulated patient-centric clinical requirements for all medical treatments while monitoring the risks and safely eliminating opioid use in patients (HRSA, 2020). The main points of focus are determining when to start or continue the use of opioid treatment on a patient for pain. It involves choosing a non-pharma logical treatment, an opioid-free treatment, and an opioid therapy.

Secondly, the goals of opioid treatments are established. The CDC looks to save lives and decrease opioid misuse, opioid use disorder, and overdose by equipping providers with the knowledge, tools, and guidance they need (CDC, 2018). A discussion is held between the nurse and the patient on the therapy’s possible risks and positive outcomes (HRSA, 2020). After that, a specific opioid is chosen, the selection is dictated by the form of release needed for the patient. It could be immediate, extended, or long-acting opioid drugs. The dosage is determined, as well as the period of treatment. Follow-ups are then discussed. Lastly, risks of using opioid drugs are put into consideration and the harms that may ensue. In addition, a review of the prescription medicine program is done. A nurse conducts urine drug testing.

Consequently, additional prescription of benzodiazepines is done, and finally, treatment for opioid use disorder problems can be organized between the nurse and the patient. Helping patients to get the right prescription of opioid medication is not the end of the battle against opioid misuse and overdose. The American nursing association can partner with several poison control centers to issue treatment suggestions for opioid poisoning, which usually happens in the form of misused prescription and illegal opioid drugs (see appendix B). According to HRSA (2020), the health resource and services administration is playing a significant role in this endeavor.

Evidence-Based Practice, Quality, and Safety

Many evidence-based practices have been done about the opioid problem. To begin, Gaiennie III & Dols (2018) posits that naloxone is an opioid antagonist that can urgently and safely cancel out the severe possible health effects of an overdose on opium (see appendix C). Naloxone reverses the opioid overdose immediately it takes and also has no risk of getting abused. In addition, it harbors no side effects on people who have no opioids in their bodies. Naloxone prescription to control the impact of opioid use in the United States has registered profound impacts. For instance, countrywide research reveals that greater than four-fifths of overdose reversals using naloxone in the United States were undertaken by persons who are regular drug users. In addition, the reason why naloxone is regarded as one of the ways of suppressing the effects of opioid use is due to research carried out in Massachusetts, which revealed that almost ninety percent of overdose reversals using naloxone were done by bystanders who are also drug users (Gaiennie, 2018). A study of the naloxone kit distribution initiative in British Columbia showed that two out of twenty kits used saved lives. In addition, an observational study in Ohio revealed that a rising number of police officers getting trained on how to use and handle naloxone led to a significant drop in opioid overdose deaths, and a high rate of survival in victims with high opioid overdose, for residents living in surrounding neighborhoods (Gaiennie, 2018). Therefore, according to EBP, more training is needed to ensure that opioid overdose and deaths have been reduced. Naloxone is easily accessible in CVS and thus making its availability increased because about 30 states have access to the CVS supplies (Gaiennie, 2018).

           Secondly, medication-assisted treatment has helped reduce the severity of the opioid pandemic in the United States. For instance, according to CDC (2018), an analysis that involved studies of methadone as medication to relieve opioid addiction revealed that methadone was more impactful in handling opioid use problems and reducing opioid abuse in comparison to other medical alternatives. In addition, a study conducted in 2014 found out that buprenorphine was equally potent in lowering illegal opioid use for those people in care (CDC, 2018). In addition, both methadone and buprenorphine were found to be effective in extended long-term treatment for opioid use problems during the follow-up period aftercare (see appendix D). Furthermore, in clinical research involving around three hundred individuals with opioid use addiction, some people were injected with long-acting naltrexone (CDC, 2018). At the same time, a part of the sample was subjected to regular counseling without treatment. During the observational period, the individuals who have injected the drug reported no incidences of overdose, while the group that was subjected to counseling only reported nearly seven cases of overdose (CDC, 2018).

Additionally, initiating buprenorphine-based medical aided treatment in emergency units also produced significant impacts. Patients receiving medical attention in emergency departments and who have an ongoing opioid use problem can be referred to a medical service provider for an extended buprenorphine-based medical aided treatment. The referral has earlier doses of buprenorphine prescription to be used for a short period. A study was done using this form of treatment in locations with long waitlists for receiving opioid-related complications through medical aided treatment (MAT). Those who were injected buprenorphine while waiting for formal treatment reported reduced rates of illegal opioid use and lowered levels of opioid withdrawal symptoms. In contrast, the other group that had to wait for medication experienced opioid-related problems (Salmond, 2019). Nurses assist the patients to receive the right medication and ensure they adhere to the treatment requirements.[supanova_question]

MANAGING COLLEGE STRESS GROUP AGENDA SESSION ONE (July 26th) – Welcome Confidentiality

MANAGING COLLEGE STRESS GROUP

AGENDA

SESSION ONE (July 26th) –

Welcome

Confidentiality Overview

Introductions

Name

How long have you been a student at University?

What are some college stressors you are experiencing?

What are some things you currently do to manage college stress?

Agenda Review

Purpose/Group Goal

Group members will learn to manage college stress through various techniques presented by the group leaders, as well as learn from other group members.

Group Values – create together

Individual Goals

SMART (Specific/Measurable/Achievable/Relevant/Time-bound)

Should “flow” from group goal

Example goal

Homework: Create your own goal(s) to bring to the next session (no more than two is probably best)

STRESS REDUCTION TECHNIQUES: BREATHING EXERCISES

Other techniques from group members?

Evaluation

SESSION TWO (Aug 2nd) –

1. Introduction of group & group members

2. Icebreaker

3. Group Values

4. Goals for Individual group members

5. Dialectical Behavior Therapy –

6. Self-Care –

7. Takeaways from Session 2

8. Introduce Session 3 co-facilitators

9. Mindfulness Practice (time allowing)

10. Time Management (time allowing)

Group participant. First, I want to thank my group for picking up a topic on to manage college stress, As a group participant I felt so gud. The group participant I was given lot of importance and to share my thoughts and ideas. I was given lot of chances to express myself about the stress which helped me to feel lot better.

Group facilitator: As a group facilitator in second week. It gave me more confident for me to run a group in future. This writer isn’t a public speaker and always feeling little down that how others going to feel, if this writer is going to communicate something wrong. But running this group helped me break all those walls. This writer gained lot of confidence running a group at my class and gave me lot of learnings and understandings. In the group this writer was able to talk about the self-care. It made this writer to feel lot better. Talking about the exercise, having nutrient food, following few hobbies that we like. As a group facilitator I feel self-care is very important to every individual person and I should appreciate my partner who played role as a group leader they given me lot of importance to my discussions and thought process and given my proper turns to discuss about my topic to my group. Last but not least my group participant they showed how involved in the group by sharing all their thought process about self-care. It made me to feel to lot worth as a group facilitator.

SESSION THREE (Aug 9th) – Alegra Chavez and Carlyn Clarke, Co-Facilitators

Ice Breaker

Check-in

Current stress levels

Anyone use any principals of time management from last session? How did it go?

Check in on individual goals

STRESS REDUCTION TECHNIQUES: MINDFULNESS EXERCISES

Mini lesson on what mindfulness is and how it can help

Specific Mindfulness Exercises

Other Techniques from group members?

Evaluation[supanova_question]

• The anthology needs to have a specific theme, for example, “Obsession in the Short Stories of Julio Cortázar.”

• The anthology needs to have a specific theme, for example, “Obsession in the Short Stories of Julio Cortázar.”

Read attached file for directions. Please read them carefully and make sure you are writing exactly what the professor

Read attached file for directions. Please read them carefully and make sure you are writing exactly what the professor. Read attached file for directions. Please read them carefully and make sure you are writing exactly what the professor.

Read attached file for directions. Please read them carefully and make sure you are writing exactly what the professor is looking for. I have attached the literature that must be used. Only pick 1 piece of literature. Do not use any other outside literature or reference any outside sources unless it is used for understanding a jesuit value.[supanova_question]

Independent Research Project: Final Project Aims and Outcomes: These assignments will contribute

Independent Research Project: Final Project

Aims and Outcomes:

These assignments will contribute to some of the following learning outcomes on this course, depending on the exact nature of your research topic, the resources you use to explore that topic, and the format you choose to convey your findings:

* Locate the history of textiles in a broader context of environmental, social, cultural, political, and economic circumstances of different times and places.

* Use methods of object-based learning to formulate historical questions on the history of textiles.

* Identify appropriate source material to use as evidence for the history of textiles.

* Analyze primary sources across a range of media (eg, written texts, visual and material culture as evidence for the history of textiles.

* Evaluate historical arguments and evidence put forward by other scholars in the field.

*Communicate aspects of the history of textiles using a variety of modes of expression (eg, academic and popular writing, peer discussion, etc).

Preparation

*By the time you embark on the final project, you will have already formulated a key question or questions that you intend to answer, and will have completed a preliminary bibliography to show the viability of the project.

*Continue to carry out your research in order to craft an answer to your question. Remember that questions that start with “how” and “why” (or other phrases such as “to what extent”) will allow you to develop original interpretations and analyses from your research more than questions that start with “who” or “when” that might lead you more to a factual or narrative structure. There is nothing wrong with facts and timelines, but I’d love to see you stretch your skills of historical interpretation.

*You are all working on very diverse topics, which will lend themselves to different research strategies. That said, as a rough guideline, I would suggest consulting c. 10-12 secondary sources and, if it seems relevant for your topic, 3-5 primary sources (including examples of textiles and/or other forms of material and visual culture) to use as examples of your larger points, but depending on your interests and approach, you could shift the balance between primary and secondary sources. I am happy to discuss this further with you in relation to your specific topic.

Also remember that “consulting” secondary sources does not necessarily mean reading every word of every book. You should learn to hone your research to what is important to your own area of inquiry. Think about the advice on searching for sources; sometimes it is useful to start with a few broader texts, especially to help you identify key examples to discuss and then ‘drill down’ into more specific areas. In addition to the library or other online search tools, you might use the footnotes and bibliographies of the works you are reading to locate other relevant source material. (Also make good use of indexes—often there are books that have useful information for your research but only perhaps a chapter is relevant, or even just a few pages—you only need to read what you feel is relevant to your topic!)

Sometimes you will not find a lot of secondary texts on your particular topic so you can think about the various strands of the research and how best to access them; for example, if you are interested in textiles and medicine, you might not find specific articles with those combinations of keywords, but if you read up on, say, the history of hospitals, you might find information about bedding and the importance of cleanliness; or you might read up on nursing to find information about uniforms, etc.

*Organise your research materials into a clear plan for your writing. Consider the question(s) you are answering and think about how best to structure your final project so that it can clearly answer that/those questions.

Final Assignment

*The final assignment may take one of four formats, discussed further below: a written paper; an online exhibit or presentation; a short film; or you may make a textile and write a short reflection on how this act of making has incorporated your research.

*Regardless of what format you choose, you should present the argument you have crafted as an outcome of your research. What did you learn? What evidence can you share to underpin your argument? What are the significance of your findings?

*Again, the varied topics you all are pursuing might result in a variety of approaches to structure, but there will be some commonalities. You always should have an introduction to explain to the reader/viewer what the project is about (eg, what is the question that fuels your research) and why this topic is significant (whether broadly significant or of interest to you, or both). I often find it effective to lay out your argument at the start of your project, and then explain how the rest of your paper, presentation, or film will be structured to delve into this further; we often refer to this as “signposting.”

*The body of your project can be structured in a variety of ways, but think about the models of reading we have done so far to guide you. So for example, you might divide your overarching topic into a few questions that you want to answer in turn, or you might have one framing question and you offer a few different examples or case studies to address it. The body of your project is not only where you answer your questions but where you build a persuasive case for your answers; what evidence have you found through your research to support your argument?

*NB: It is fine at any point in your essay to indicate if there are debates about the meaning and significance of your topic, or the specific examples, and let us know how you evaluate this after weighing up your readings. For example, perhaps another author writes that your theme is of less importance, but you want to take a stand for why you think it is important: that is grand. Or if one author thinks that a particular kind of textiles is an example of one thing and another author thinks it is an example of something else, you can tell us what you find more persuasive and why. You do not need to do this more “historiographic” work, but if you ever find that your source materials seem to be contradicting one another, that is not a problem—that can become an interesting point of your research!

*At the end of your project you should have a brief conclusion that focuses on the argument, and its contribution or significance. You might also note further questions that arise from the research you have done. As this is not a terribly long assignment, you do not need to entirely recap the points you have made in the body of your essay, but instead really try to bring these different strands, examples, or case studies together into a punchy final statement or section. For your conclusion think about what you want the main “takeaway” to be for your reader or viewer and state that clearly.

*Written Paper Option: If you choose to write an essay, it should be c. 2000-2500 words (not counting referencing and bibliography). Please make sure your work is referenced properly. You may use whatever referencing system you choose, as long as you use it consistently and thoroughly. I am always happy to give guidance on referencing and citation.

*Short Film Option: Your film should be c. 5-7 minutes. Its structure should replicate the approach of an introduction; examples, case studies, or sub-questions; and conclusion, but presumably will do so in a more visual way. In lieu of footnotes/endnotes, you might include in either voiceover or “text cards” (that are filmed for long enough for the viewer to read them!) a brief comment on what scholars have been influential to your thinking about particular points and/or your might visually share your source material, especially primary sources. With a film there will not be the same expectations of referencing throughout as you would have in a written paper, so it is important to include a bibliography on screen at the end of your film (again, you can print this and film it) to show off the research you have done.

*Online Exhibit or Presentation: This option is the hardest to “quantify” in terms of number of slides or cards or images because that will depend so much on what your specific topic is, but basically, the exhibit or presentation needs to be long enough to convey your argument, and the research that underpinned it, in a robust way. So I think about this option in terms of the structure or “storyboard” as opposed to length; rather than having the paragraphs you might have in a written essay, you will have building blocks of your presentation, so if you think about a 2000-2500 word essay having maybe 8-10 paragraphs, this might have 8-10 blocks, but, much like an essay, those might be grouped together in various ways. A “block” might be one slide or card, or a few of them that fit together (such as two images and some explanatory text), depending on both your topic and the software you use.

You may use a variety of options for the software, such as Sway, Canva, Prezi, or even Power Point, though I think the first three may offer a bit more visual interest for a short presentation that is not accompanied by other lecture materials. Your presentation may be entirely visual, using text and image to build your argument, or you may incorporate voice-over if you want.

Similar to the film option, I do not have the expectation for footnotes/endnotes in a presentation of this type but it would be good to have captions for images and/or briefly mention any key sources in your text/voiceover, or include them as visuals. You should include a bibliography at the end of the presentation to show off the research you have done.

*Making Option: Finally, you may choose to make a textile, or textile-related object (eg, tools, images of textiles, etc), that is based in the research you have done. This might be the replication of a historical technique, or it might be an interpretation of some past theme of textile history. If you choose this option, you must also submit a short (c. 750-1000 words) essay that explains how your research underpins what you have made; you still should have an argument derived from your research that you are putting forward in your work and your text. So for example, perhaps you are studying the textile traditions of a certain place and time and find one particular motif to be dominant and have learned reasons why that is the case. You might create an object with that motif to represent the crux of your research.[supanova_question]

Read attached file for directions. Please read them carefully and make sure you are writing exactly what the professor

Read attached file for directions. Please read them carefully and make sure you are writing exactly what the professor

Rough Draft Due: 9/29 Final Draft Due: 10/3 Paper Length: 3-4 Pages Format: Typed, Double-Spaced, 12 pt. Times New Essay

Rough Draft Due: 9/29 Final Draft Due: 10/3 Paper Length: 3-4 Pages Format: Typed, Double-Spaced, 12 pt. Times New Essay. Rough Draft Due: 9/29 Final Draft Due: 10/3 Paper Length: 3-4 Pages Format: Typed, Double-Spaced, 12 pt. Times New Essay.

Rough Draft Due: 9/29
Final Draft Due: 10/3
Paper Length: 3-4 Pages
Format: Typed, Double-Spaced, 12 pt. Times New Roman
Points: 150

Purpose:
The purpose of this assignment is to find two variants of an urban legend and examine their rhetorical and narratological differences in order to understand why their speakers chose the techniques that they used. You will be exploring how they use ethos, pathos, and logos, as well as focusing on how the speaker might be accounting for time and place (setting). You will discuss how the legend variants use two of these 2 themes: deserved comeuppance, horror, morals, friend of a friend, recurring motifs, supernatural vs. explained). Additionally, you will find one scholarly research article on your legend and use it to back up your
argument.

Research:
To decide on an urban legend, you want to do some research. Find a legend that interests you, has multiple variants, includes variants from either different cultures or different time periods, and has been researched by folklore scholars in academic journals.

Thesis:
Your thesis is going to discuss how the tales differ in how they use
rhetorical techniques and folklore elements, considering which one is more effective in getting their point across and convincing you. In turn, in your paper, you will discuss how convincing each legend variant is when it comes to using rhetoric and folklore themes to persuade.

Audience:
Write for a knowledgeable and educated audience, such as your
classmates, that is familiar with your urban legend, but is not necessarily familiar with the different variants. What information do you need to include to convince them of your viewpoint?

Essay Organization and Development
As you draft your paper, consider the following:
 Identify your urban legend, its variants, and present your thesis (which variant is more effective)
 Evaluate how each legend variant uses rhetoric to persuade, engage, or teach
 Examine how your variants account for time and place
 Make sure you explain how each variant uses two similar themes
differently
 Discuss Ethos, Pathos, Logos
3
 Include quotes from one scholarly article from JSTOR or Ebscohost to reinforce your claims
 Add direct quotes from your urban legend to reinforce your argument
 You can organize your paper by examining each variant in separate paragraphs, and then making your conclusions. Or you can discuss the themes and rhetoric for each variant in the same paragraphs, basing them on major elements.
 Critically analyze the evidence in your legend
 Include a conclusion that sums up your findings and addresses other possibilities or directions
 Provide a references page in MLA format[supanova_question]

Six Components of Building an E-Commerce Presence

Assignment DescriptionThis assignment has two components. You will need to complete both parts to receive credit for the assignment.
Assignment RequirementsScholarly writing is expected. All written submissions in BUS 255 should be written in APA style (Links to an external site.) and formatted accordingly. This includes paper formatting, citations, reference list, and writing in the third-person tone of voice. Students are not expected to include a title page and running head until the final paper in this course.
Assignment InstructionsPart ISelect an international e-commerce website of your choice and apply the six components of building an e-commerce presence. THE WESITE IS AMAZON
Mission and vision statement
Target audience
Company analysis
Competitor analysis
Marketplace and analysis
E-commerce presence map
Part IISelect an e-commerce website that was hacked. Answer the following: THE WEBSITE IS MACYS
What type of information was hacked?
What security measures took place in order to prevent future data breaches.
What type of hacker performed the task? (i.e. White Hat)

done
Seen
7 mins ago[supanova_question]

Persuasive Speech Outline (Note that anything in bold (blue or black) is

Rough Draft Due: 9/29 Final Draft Due: 10/3 Paper Length: 3-4 Pages Format: Typed, Double-Spaced, 12 pt. Times New Essay Persuasive Speech Outline

(Note that anything in bold (blue or black) is just an outline heading and is not meant to be read out loud.)

INTRODUCTION

Persuasive Attention Getter: According to Business Insider of July 30, 2017, Gerald Alvarez was a few days out of prison and feeling nervous. He said it was difficult to “transfer jobs, or anything of the sort. Everyone says, ‘Oh, you have a felony… we’re not interested.’” According to the National Employment Law Project of 2014 (an organization dedicated to fighting for worker’s rights), nearly 65 million people are unemployed due to prior criminal histories that haunt them on their job applications.  

Establish Credibility: I have worked as a recruiter for a few years and have seen the discriminatory nature of conviction history questions on job applications first-hand.

TRS: So Today, I will introduce you to a policy called “Ban the Box,” a movement dedicated to putting off questions about a job candidate’s conviction history on an application until after a conditional offer of employment has been extended.

Persuasive Goal: By the end of my speech, I hope to convince you that we as Californians need to join this movement and end job discrimination on the basis of criminal history.

Preview: I will present three reasons why California needs to Ban the Box. First, individuals with criminal histories are more productive workers. Second, this action will actually will come with many advantages for the companies that hire them. Third, banning the box will bolster the economy as a whole.

BODY

Main Point 1: Productive Workers

Transition: I will start by discussing why individuals with criminal histories are more productive workers.

Support Point (Statistic): Evoly, a company that evaluates large amounts of employment statistics to help companies’ profile successful employees, has found that in 2012 “employees with criminal backgrounds are 1 to 1.5 percent more productive on the job than people without criminal records.”

Support Point (Excerpt): In 2014, CEO John Tucker of Dave’s Killer Bread, a company dedicated to hiring ex-convicts, stated “overall, the performance of our ex-convicts is higher than our non-convicts. Most people would think it’s the opposite: that ex-felons are a challenge, are difficult. That is simply not the case.”

Support Point (Exceprt): The Week Magazine, a global political magazine, attributes this productivity to their desire to avoid getting back into bad habits that will land them back in prison.

Main Point 2: Company Advantages

Transition: Next, we’ll look at the many competitive advantageous companies can enjoy by hiring ex-convicts.

Wider Applicant Pool

Support Point (Statistic): The first is that it gives companies a wider applicant pool. The Public Interest Law Center of Philadelphia reported in 2014 that ever since Target has banned the box, they have seen a near 20% spike in applicants. Although Target still reserves the right to ask about conviction histories after a conditional offer of employment has been made, their efforts have not only widened their candidate pool (a “win” in terms of recruitment), but also promoted themselves as a forward-thinking and inclusive employer of choice.  

Financial Advantages

Support Point (Statistic): The second advantages it gives companies is simply more money. Dr. Michael Welch of Rutgers University Criminal Justice Program stated in 2012 that “formerly incarcerated or convicted individuals who are currently employed … increase company earnings by as much as 2 percent.”

Support Point (Excerpt): Additionally, in 2011, The US Department of Labor offered tax breaks, known as the Work Opportunity Tax Credit, to companies that hire people with prior convictions. Companies who hire ex-felons can receive up to $2,400 per year in credits.

Support Point (Excerpt): The source goes on to explain that if the tax break isn’t enough to encourage companies, there is also Federal Bonding Program monies distributed by each state, which insures an employer against potential theft for the first six months an ex-convict is on the job.

Main Point 3: Bolsters Economy

Transition: Finally, let’s look at how hiring ex-convicts will bolster the economy as a whole. That starts by looking at something called recidivism.

Support Point (Statistic): Recidivism is the act of relapsing into an undesirable habit, such as crime and going back to prison. According to the Bureau of Justice 2015 statistics, an estimated 67% of offenders were rearrested within 3 years. Without opportunities to rematriculate into society by way of a job, criminals will not be able to break the cycle.

Support Point (Statistic): Recidivism rates are cited to drop nearly 20% if programs like ban the box become more and more prevalent, according to Washington State Institute for Public Policy in 2012.

Support Point (Excerpt): In 2013, According to the Economy League, reduced recidivism will lower costs for government agencies overseeing law enforcement, courts, corrections, and post-release supervision. The reduced costs result in taxpayer benefits and budget savings.

Support Point (Excerpt): According to a 2012 publication from the Center for Economic Policy and Research, the US economy has lost between $57 billion and $65 billion in GDP due to the reduction in workforce for those who have prior convictions.  

CONCLUSION

Restate TRS: Today, I discussed the Ban the Box movement.

Review of Main Points: Specifically, I discussed why banning the box is beneficial because ex-convicts are good workers, because it increases profits for companies, and because it would make the economy stronger.

Lasting Thought/Call to Action: Gerald Alvarez said that many people in his neighborhood “just go immediately back to what they know once they’re out of prison.” That’s generally selling drugs. But he’s one of the few who’s managed to hold down a job. He started off scrubbing toilets for $30 a day. Eight years later, he became a supervisor at a warehouse in Queens and started his own business in 2016. Banning the box isn’t just a jobs program. It’s a morality check that suspends the prejudices we associate with ex-cons, and ensures that anyone on a legitimate path to redemption can be treated like a human being once again.

Works Cited

“A Salute to Target for Banning the Box.” Public Interest Law Center of Philadelphia. 1 Jan.

2014. Web. Jun. 13 2015.

“Ban the Box Campaign.” Evoly. 13 May 2012. Web. 17 Jun. 2015.

“Ban The Box.” National Employment Law Project. Sep. 2014. Web. 16 Jun. 2015.

Bell, Jon. “Dave’s Killer Rising.” Portland Business Journal. 20 Jun. 2014. Web. 15 Jun. 2015.

“Economic Benefits of Employing Formerly Incarcerated Individuals.” Economy League. Sep.

2013. Web. 14 Jun. 2015.

“Evidence-Based Public Policy Option to Reduce Future Prison Construction, Criminal Justice

Costs, and Crime Rates.” Washington State Institute for Public Policy. Oct. 2012. Web. 15 Jun. 2015.

Heroux, Paul. “Reducing Recidivism: The Challenge of Successful Prisoner Re-Entry.” The  

Huffington Post. 17 Aug. 2014. Web. 17 Jun. 2015.

“Reentry Trends In The US: Recidivism.” Bureau of Justice Statistics. Jun. 2015. Web. Jun. 16

2015.

Schmitt, John and Kris Warner. “Ex Offenders and the Labor Market.” Center for Economic and

Policy Research. Nov. 2012. Web. 12 Jun. 2015.

“The Federal Bonding Program.” United States Department of Labor. Dev. 2011. Web. Jun. 14

2015.

Welch, Michael. Corrections: A Critical Approach. New York: Routledge, 2011. Print.

“Work Opportunity Tax Credit.” United States Department of Labor. Dec. 2011. Web. Jun. 14

2015.[supanova_question]

Assignment 2: A playlist (1000 words). Released on 22 November 2021. Due

Assignment 2: A playlist (1000 words).

Released on 22 November 2021.

Due on 9 December 2021 at 4pm GMT.

30% of final mark.

Assignment aims:

This playlist (1000 words) will give you an opportunity to reflect on your music tastes, your preferences and your knowledge of a broad repertory, creating a narrative to go with it and tell your story. It will also give you a chance to think about how to design music programmes and insights into the ways in which professional playlist curators operate. Through research on your selected topic, you will also gain insights on your chosen theme, your target audiences’ tastes according to demographic, and the role playlists play in shaping people’s musical tastes (70% of final mark).

Collecting the metadata for each item on your playlist will help you demonstrate your research skills (30% of final mark).

Assignment instructions:

A playlist is an annotated listening list (or discography) structured around a theme (similar to the topic of an essay). You must justify your theme and choices with an introduction setting out their scope, identify your audience and explain why you think a specific target demographic will be interested in your playlist. You need to provide evidence of research to justify your choices. You will then create a list of 10 items and for each item you will need to provide the following essential metadata:

Track title

Orchestra/band name/Artist/Performer

Album name

Record label

Writer/lyricist/composer

Publisher

Genre/sub-genre

Track length

Year of song composition

Year of track release (this may be different from the year of song composition, so be careful which version you are referring to).

Here are two examples for you:

EXAMPLE 1

Track title

Hallelujah

Orchestra/Band/Artist/

Performer

Jeff Buckley

Album name

Grace

Record label

Columbia Records

Writer/lyricist/composer

Leonard Cohen

Publisher

Sony/atv Songs Llc

Genre/sub-genre

Alternative Rock/Folk Rock/Blues

Track length

05:22

Year of song composition

1984

Year of track release

1994

EXAMPLE 2

Track title

II. Molto Vivace, Symphony No.9 in D minor, Op.125

Orchestra/Band/Artist/

Performer

Claudio Abbado/ J Eaglen, W Meier, B Heppner, B Terfel; Berlin Phil; Berlin Philharmoniker

Album name

Beethoven Symphonie NR. 9

Record label

Sony

Writer/lyricist/composer

Ludwig van Beethoven

Publisher

Out of Copyright. Original composition in Public Domain.  

Genre/sub-genre

Classical

Track length

13:50

Year of song composition

1822-1824

Year of track release

1996

Your work will be assessed for the completeness and interest of the “story” it tells and the accuracy of the information you provide for each track.

Please note: for classical, traditional, some folk music and in general for music composed around 50-70 years ago, it might not be possible to identify the publisher. The work might be out of copyright in certain countries or in public domain. In these cases you can leave the publisher line empty if you are not sure and you won’t be penalised for doing so.

Formatting and presentation instructions:

Use Arial 12pt if using Microsoft Word, or equivalent font and size if using any other software.

For references, we recommend using a so-called “author-date” system of your choice: Chicago (author-date), APA, MLA or Harvard are all very good options. Instructions on how to use these systems can be found here. Referencing software is available to help you with your references here.

You must include a list of references at the end of your assignment.

Assignment

Rationale behind your playlist. What is the theme that runs through all the pieces you chose to include? How is it relevant to you? This could be a classical piano technique, a colour, a season, a mood or emotion, an idea, a composer. It’s really your choice.

(max 500 words)

Do you envision a particular sequence for these pieces, or can they be shuffled? Why?

(max 100 words)

Who is your target demographic for this playlist and why do you think they will be interested?

(max 400 words)

Your playlist of 10 items. For each item you need to include the relevant metadata listed in the assignment instructions

TRACK 1

Track title

Do you want to build a snowman?

Orchestra/Band/Artist/

Performer

Album name

Record label

Writer/lyricist/composer

Publisher

Genre/sub-genre

Track length

Year of song composition

Year of track release

TRACK 2

Track title

Orchestra/Band/Artist/

Performer

Album name

Record label

Writer/lyricist/composer

Publisher

Genre/sub-genre

Track length

Year of song composition

Year of track release

TRACK 3

Track title

Orchestra/Band/Artist/

Performer

Album name

Record label

Writer/lyricist/composer

Publisher

Genre/sub-genre

Track length

Year of song composition

Year of track release

TRACK 4

Track title

Orchestra/Band/Artist/

Performer

Album name

Record label

Writer/lyricist/composer

Publisher

Genre/sub-genre

Track length

Year of song composition

Year of track release

TRACK 5

Track title

Orchestra/Band/Artist/

Performer

Album name

Record label

Writer/lyricist/composer

Publisher

Genre/sub-genre

Track length

Year of song composition

Year of track release

TRACK 6

Track title

Orchestra/Band/Artist/

Performer

Album name

Record label

Writer/lyricist/composer

Publisher

Genre/sub-genre

Track length

Year of song composition

Year of track release

TRACK 7

Track title

Orchestra/Band/Artist/

Performer

Album name

Record label

Writer/lyricist/composer

Publisher

Genre/sub-genre

Track length

Year of song composition

Year of track release

TRACK 8

Track title

Orchestra/Band/Artist/

Performer

Album name

Record label

Writer/lyricist/composer

Publisher

Genre/sub-genre

Track length

Year of song composition

Year of track release

TRACK 9

Track title

Orchestra/Band/Artist/

Performer

Album name

Record label

Writer/lyricist/composer

Publisher

Genre/sub-genre

Track length

Year of song composition

Year of track release

TRACK 10

Track title

Orchestra/Band/Artist/

Performer

Album name

Record label

Writer/lyricist/composer

Publisher

Genre/sub-genre

Track length

Year of song composition

Year of track release

Before you submit your playlist, ask yourself these questions, which will be used to mark your work:

Content:

Have I provided a thorough and precise description of the theme of my playlist, of the target audience, and of why I think the pieces I chose fit within my narrative?

Am I analysing the theme I chose, the reasons why I think the pieces I chose will fit well and how I identified my target audience and why? Am I discussing, engaging critically, drawing connections and am I asking “why” and “how” my playlist will have a certain effect on people, for example, in addition to stating my choices? Tips on critical thinking can be found here and in related links: https://library.soton.ac.uk/sash/critical-thinking

Are my interpretations original and creative? Am I offering a novel approach to this problem or theme? Am I demonstrating my own expertise in this subject? Am I using examples that beyond those that were not discussed in class?

Research:

Am I demonstrating that I researched the theme of my playlist, that what I say about the music is correct and relevant, that my target audience has been chosen according to data and research I have done?

Am I drawing on the relevant recorded lectures, discussions in seminars, and all the other sources we have explored during the semester? Am I demonstrating that I engaged with the module and what was discussed?

To what extent am I expanding from what was discussed in class, bringing in more relevant topics, sources, connections?

Am I using reliable sources? If using blogs or other online sources written by anonymous authors, can I verify that the information they give is correct and reliable using other sources?

Am I acknowledging all the sources I am using, including online resources, lectures and seminars? Tips of academic integrity can be found on this page and related links: https://library.soton.ac.uk/sash/what-is-academic-integrity

Communication:

Is my description well structured, clear, precise? Am I repeating myself, or are there concepts/ideas that could be discussed together to avoid repetitions? Would using bullet points help with clarity?

Are my opinions and arguments clearly expressed?

Is my prose clear enough that my reader will find my argument easy to understand? Am I using too many words to say something I could say in a more concise way? Tips of academic writing can be found here and in related links: https://library.soton.ac.uk/sash/what-is-academic-integrity

Is my referencing consistent? Will my reader be able to find the source I used?

Have I included a list of references at the end?

Presentation:

Did I carefully check my text for spelling and typos?

Am I presenting my assignment in a way that shows my attention to details? Is the formatting correct, so that there are no problems of inconsistent indents, changes of font type, use of bold or italics where it is not necessary etc.?

22 November 2021[supanova_question]

Question: You have to create a small website based on an idea

Question:

You have to create a small website based on an idea you will choose.

In this project, you should design and develop a website using HTML and CSS. (10 Marks)

Design

Identify the site’s goals, the site’s users

Wireframe diagrams and site diagram

2

HTML

Use different HTML Web elements (paragraphs, headings, images, lists, tables, forms …)

5

Navigation: Links should be clear and located in the same area on each page. All links should be functional.

CSS

Describe the presentation of Web pages, including colors, layout, fonts…

Website clearly demonstrates design principles: with consistent alignment, proximity, repetition, and contrast…

3

Total

10

Important Notes:

The number of Web pages must be at least 7

Use the same theme across the website

Use correct HTML and CSS syntax

Add Navigation menu to all pages (appear at the same area in all pages)

The student must use the same file (IT404_Project.docx) to prepare his answer.

For the design part, the student must identify the tool or application that is used in the wireframe diagrams and site diagram (Photoshop or Illustrator…etc.)

For each part of the project (HTML and CSS) the student must:

copy and paste the website code

add screenshots of the output with a brief explication of each functionality of the web application.

Student should submit:

This form docx & pdf format docx

Project.zip contains all the files of the project (Design, HTML and CSS).[supanova_question]

EFB201 Tutorial One Questions 1. Explain the key roles of the financial

EFB201 Tutorial One Questions

1. Explain the key roles of the financial system. Why is it so important to the broader economy to have an efficient and effective financial system?

2. Compare and contrast debt and equity as a source of funds for financial claims.

3. What are some problems with direct financing that make indirect financing more attractive?

4. Explain how you believe economic activity would be affected if there were no financial markets and institutions.

5. What are the three sources of comparative advantage that financial institutions have over others in producing financial products?

6. Explain the concept of financial intermediation. How does the possibility of financial intermediation increase the efficiency of the financial system?

7. What is the difference between primary and secondary markets?

8. Explain the differences between the money markets and the capital markets. Which market would Holden use to finance a new vehicle assembly plant? Why?

9. Discuss three forms of financial market efficiency. Why is it important that financial markets be efficient?

10. What are the major risks faced by financial institutions and why is it important that each is carefully managed?

11. Why is globalisation of the international markets important to the Australian financial system?

12. Discuss the four attributes of financial assets.

13. Discuss the major derivative products.

EFB201 Tutorial One Solutions

1. Explain the key roles of the financial system. Why is it so important to the broader economy to have an efficient and effective financial system?

Financial markets are the markets for buying and selling financial instruments. Financial markets have five primary functions:

1. Facilitating the flow of funds

2. providing the mechanism for the settlement of transactions

3. generating and disseminating information that assists decision making

4. providing means for the transfer and management of risk

5. provide ways of dealing with the incentive problems that arise in financial contracting

Having an efficient and effective financial system is critical as it facilitates commercial, retail and government transactions in a timely, low cost and reliable way. The opposite would be a system where funds take a long time to reach their destination (i.e. direct debits may take weeks), with high cost (significantly greater transactions costs) and with great risk (to either their value or likelihood of arrival). An efficient and effective financial system will also produce actual and timely information to enable effective financial decision making, which is also important in the complex financial world of today.

When one considers what we take for granted in the financial system (EFTPOS, Electronic Transfer, Direct Debit, etc.) in terms of its reliability) and consider the time and cost involved in doing this manually, one can see the importance of the financial system.

2. Compare and contrast debt and equity as a source of funds for financial claims.

Financial claims are sourced from either debt or equity funds. Debt funds are supplied in the form of a loan and are either short-term (referred to as money) or long-term (referred to as capital). Suppliers of loans face credit risk – the risk that the borrower will default on scheduled repayments as specified in the loan agreement. The lender is compensated for this with interest income. Equity funding involves the acquisition of an ownership share of a business, which is usually seen as a longer-term investment and hence referred to as capital investment. Equity investors face investment risk, the possibility that the investors expected return will not be realized, and are compensated with dividend payments and capital growth (where the value of the ownership share increases over time) for bearing this

3. What are some problems with direct financing that make indirect financing more attractive?

Direct financing requires a more or less exact match between the characteristics of the financial claims DSUs wish to sell and those the SSUs want to buy. Direct financing can thus involve a costly search and negotiation process, often complicated by information asymmetries concerning ultimate credit risk of the DSU. Intermediaries transform direct claims sold by DSUs and make them more attractive to SSUs, helping DSUs find financing and SSUs find appropriate investments.

4. Explain how you believe economic activity would be affected if there were no financial markets and institutions.

Financing relationships would arise only when preferences of SSUs and DSUs match. DSUs would not always obtain timely financing for attractive projects and SSUs would under-utilize their savings. The “production possibilities frontier” of the society would be smaller.

5. What are the three sources of comparative advantage that financial institutions have over others in producing financial products?

(1) Economies of scale —large volumes of similar transactions; (2) transaction cost control—finding and negotiating direct investments less expensively; and (3) risk management expertise—bridging the “information gap” about DSUs’ creditworthiness.

6. Explain the concept of financial intermediation. How does the possibility of financial intermediation increase the efficiency of the financial system?

Financial intermediation is the process by which financial institutions mediate unmatched preferences of ultimate borrowers (DSUs) and ultimate lenders (SSUs). Financial intermediaries buy financial claims with one set of characteristics from DSUs, and then issue their own liabilities with different characteristics to SSUs. Thus, financial intermediaries “transform” claims to make them more attractive to both DSUs and SSUs. This increases the amount and regularity of participation in the financial system, thus promoting the 3 forms of efficiency—allocational, informational, and operational.

7. What is the difference between primary and secondary markets?

Primary markets are those in which financial claims are initially sold by DSUs. All financial claims have primary markets. Secondary financial markets are like used-car markets; they let people exchange ‘used’ or previously issued financial claims for cash at will, and hence they provide liquidity for investors who own primary claims. Securities can only be sold once in a primary market; all subsequent transactions take place in secondary markets. The Australian Stock Exchange (ASX) is an example of a well-known secondary market.

8. Explain the differences between the money markets and the capital markets. Which market would Holden use to finance a new vehicle assembly plant? Why?

Money markets are markets for liquidity, whether borrowed to finance current operations or lent to avoid holding idle cash in the short term. Money markets tend to be wholesale OTC markets made by dealers. Capital markets are where real assets or “capital goods” are permanently financed, and involve a variety of wholesale and retail arrangements, both on organized exchanges and in OTC markets. GM would finance its new plant by issuing bonds or stock in the capital market. Investors would purchase those securities to build wealth over the long term, not to store liquidity. GMAC, the finance company subsidiary of GM, would finance its loan receivables both in the money market (commercial paper) and in the capital market (notes and bonds). GM would use the money market to “store” cash in money market securities, which are generally, safe, liquid, and short-term.

9. Discuss three forms of financial market efficiency. Why is it important that financial markets be efficient?

There are three forms of market efficiency: allocational efficiency, informational efficiency, and operational efficiency. Allocational efficiency is a form of economic efficiency that implies that funds will be allocated to (i.e., invested in) their highest valued use (the funds could not have been allocated in any other way that would have made society better off). This is important as it promotes investment in the projects offering the highest risk-adjusted rates of return and that households invest in direct or indirect financial claims offering the highest yields for given levels of risk.

Informational efficiency relates to the ability of investors to obtain accurate information about the relative values of different financial claims (or securities). In an informationally efficient market, securities’ prices are the best indicators of relative value because market prices reflect all relevant information about the securities. This is important as it allows investors to determine which investments are the most valuable and ensures that the financial markets are allocationally efficient because households or business firms can get the information they need to make intelligent investment decisions.

A market is operationally efficient if the costs of conducting transactions are as low as possible. This is important because if transaction costs are high, fewer financial transactions will take place, and a greater number of otherwise valuable investment projects will be passed up. Thus, high transaction costs can prevent firms from investing in all desirable projects. The forgone investment opportunities mean that fewer people are employed and economic growth slows or declines. Society becomes worse off.

10. What are the major risks faced by financial institutions and why is it important that each is carefully managed?

Credit Risk (or default risk) is the possibility that a borrower may not pay as agreed. Management of credit risk is important as excessive credit risk will lead to higher regulatory costs (credit based capital adequacy requirements to be discussed later in the text) and may lead to the failure of the firm through cash flow and non-performing loans problems.

Interest Rate Risk is the likelihood that interest rate fluctuations will change a security’s price and reinvestment income. As a significant part of financial institutions investments and sources of funds are interest-bearing and profits are generated on the margin between these, managing both the investment and funding portfolio’s for interest rate risk is important for profits, cash flows and the stability of the institution.

Liquidity Risk is the possibility that a financial institution may be unable to pay required cash outflows. If a financial institution is unable to meet its short-term obligations because of inadequate liquidity, the firm will fail even though over the long run the firm may be profitable.

Foreign Exchange Risk is the possibility of loss on fluctuations in exchange rates. These fluctuations can cause gains or losses in the currency positions of financial institutions, and they cause the Australian dollar values of non-Australian financial investments to change.

Political Risk is the possibility that government action will harm an institution’s interests. This includes changes in regulation, appropriation of assets, changes to foreign investment and currency transfer and trading rules, all of which can influence the earnings and value of a financial institution.

Reputational Risk is the potential for negative publicity to cause loss through decline in customer base, increased litigation and revenue reductions.

Environmental Risk is the actual and/or potential threat of adverse impact on asset values due to changes in the environment and/or organisational impacts on the environment.

11. Why is globalisation of the international markets important to the Australian financial system?

This is important due to the small size of the Australian system in global terms. Hence internationalisation offers both additional sources of funds (from international investors), opportunities for Australian investors and institutions to diversify into offshore investments, and also a source of competition for domestic institutions which leads to improved efficiency of the domestic system. The impact of these was seen in the GFC where international concerns heavily impacted the Australian financial system. These impacts continued to a number of years as the higher cost of capital in the international markets (which the Australian banks rely upon for funding) put pressure on margins.

12. Discuss the four attributes of financial assets.

A financial asset has four attributes:

Return or yield

Risk

Liquidity of asset

Time-pattern of cash flows

The average saver likes return and liquidity, dislikes risk and prefers reliable cash flows.

13. Discuss the major derivative products.

There are four basic types of derivative contracts:

Forward contract

This is a contract to buy or sell a specified amount of an asset at a price decided upon today. The delivery and payment for the asset, however, will occur on a future date.

These contracts are traded over the counter (a private contract between two parties).

Futures contract

This contract is similar to a forward contract but it is traded on a futures exchange.

Having a secondary market means the contract can be traded out of at any time (i.e. a futures buyer would sell to get out and a futures seller would buy to get out)

Option contract

This is a contract which gives the buyer of the contract the right to buy (Call Option) or sell (Put Option) an asset at a predetermined price before or on a future date.

Unlike a futures or forward contract the buyer does not have the obligation to proceed with the contract.

The buyer must pay the seller (writer) of the contract a premium (or price) for the right.

Swap contract

This is an arrangement to swap specified future cash flows.

An interest rate swap occurs when there is an exchange (or swap) of interest rate payments at future dates.

These interest payments are based on a notional principal.

A cross currency swap occurs when there is an exchange of cash flows denominated in different currencies at a fixed exchange rate.

The initial and final principal loan payments as well as interest payments are exchanged.[supanova_question]

Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Ministry of Education Saudi Electronic University ??????? ???????

Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

Ministry of Education

Saudi Electronic University

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College of Administrative and Financial Sciences

Assignment-3

MGT422 – Business Ethics and Organizational Social Responsibility

Deadline: 04/12/2021 @ 23:59

Instructions – PLEASE READ THEM CAREFULLY

This assignment is an individual assignment.

Due date for Assignment 2 is by the end of Week 11.(20/11/2020)

The Assignment must be submitted only in WORD format via allocated folder.

Assignments submitted through email will not be accepted.

Students are advised to make their work clear and well presented, marks may be reduced for poor presentation. This includes filling your information on the cover page.

Students must mention question number clearly in their answer.

Late submission will NOT be accepted.

Avoid plagiarism, the work should be in your own words, copying from students or other resources without proper referencing will result in ZERO marks. No exceptions.

All answered must be typed using Times New Roman (size 12, double-spaced) font. No pictures containing text will be accepted and will be considered plagiarism).

Submissions without cover page will NOT be accepted.

Course Learning Outcomes-Covered

Aligned

PLOs

Course Learning Outcomes (CLOs)

MGT.M.3.2

The capacity to write coherent project about a case study or an actual research about ethics

Assignment Instructions:

General Motors’ Failure to Consider Stakeholders

General Motors (GM) has struggled with its brands and its image. Over the years, it has jettisoned some of its once-popular brands, including Oldsmobile and Pontiac, sold many others, and climbed back from a 2009 bankruptcy and reorganization. The automaker was hiding an even bigger problem, however: The ignition switch in many of its cars was prone to malfunction, causing injury and even death. The faulty switches caused 124 deaths and 273 injuries, and GM was finally brought to federal court. In 2014, the company reached a settlement for $900 million and recalled 2.6 million cars.

The case exemplifies the tension between the concept that “the only goal of business is to profit, so the only obligation that the businessperson has is to maximize profit for the owner or the stockholders” on one hand, and the ethical obligations a company owes to its other stakeholders on the other. GM’s failure to consider its stakeholders and consumers when choosing not to report the potential for malfunction of the ignition switches led to an ethical breakdown in its operations and cost the company and its customers dearly. In addition, by treating customers as only a means toward an end, the company turned its back on a generation of loyal buyers.

Questions

Read the above Case Study and answer the following Questions:

What virtues and values shared by its long-time customers did General Motors betray by failing to disclose an inherent danger built into its cars? (Not less than 600 words) 2.5-Marks

How do you think that betrayal affected the company’s brand and the way car buyers felt about the firm? How might it have affected its shareholders’ views of GM? (Not less than 600 words) 2.5-Marks[supanova_question]

Exploring Newsworthy Economic Issues ECO 1001 Fall 2021 Dr. Reed Introduction: One

Exploring Newsworthy Economic Issues

ECO 1001

Fall 2021 Dr. Reed

Introduction:

One goal of this class is for students to become more economically literate, meaning you should be able to read, understand, analyze, and relate current events to the topics covered in this microeconomics class. As stated on the syllabus, “Importantly, the topics covered in this course will provide a foundation for economic analysis of relevant issues observed in the economy.” To that end, you are required to read current news articles, analyze them in context of the concepts/models learned in this course, and answer questions about these articles.

Directions:

The following questions refer to news articles from The Wall Street Journal. The articles are available to you on Blackboard. You are to answer these questions using concepts covered in ECO 1001. Answers to these questions using concepts not covered in ECO 1001 will not be given credit.

Discussion among your peers regarding these questions is permitted, but all work that is submitted must be your own work. Any submissions that are similar beyond coincidence will not receive credit.

(20 points) In chapter 3, we discussed how demand and supply together determine prices for goods/services and how different factors would affect supply/demand. Read The Wall Street Journal article “Levi’s Won’t Be Unraveled by Cotton Price Surge”, and discuss each of the following points in a minimum of 2 complete sentences each:

The article states, “last year’s stimulus has left many shoppers’ wallets fatter.” If consumers purchase more goods from Levi Strauss when their incomes increase, what type of goods are these? What conclusions can you draw about the income elasticity for goods produced by Levi Strauss?

Using the supply and demand model, how can an increase in income be modeled in the market for Levi’s jeans? In the model, what is the resulting change to price? Is this consistent with the data cited in the article? (Note: You do not necessarily need to draw a supply and demand model. Instead, you can just explain how the model would show the change to income. However, you can draw the model if you would like.)

Using the supply and demand model, how can an increase in cotton prices be modeled in the market for Levi’s jeans? In the model, what is the resulting change to price? (Same note as part b.)

The article states, “Today, many apparel brands-including Levi’s-have regained pricing power” (referring to passing on higher costs to consumers in the form of higher prices). What does this imply about the price elasticity of demand for Levi’s products?

(30 points) Chapter 6 highlights one way in which governments can play a role in markets through price controls. Read The Wall Street Journal article “In Food Delivery, Iron Fist Could Trump the Invisible Hand”, and then answer the following questions:

One approach to thinking about the market for food delivery services is such that the supply of the food delivery services is provided by firms such as DoorDash, Grubhub, and Uber Eats and the demand comes from restaurants. Draw a graphical representation of this model (be sure to label your axes). (Note: You can choose to make this graph electronically or you can simply hand draw it. Either option is completely acceptable.)

NYC legislature wants to cap the price that delivery firms can charge restaurants. What type of price control does this exemplify? Explain your answer in 1-2 sentences.

For this price control to be binding, where should it be set relative to the equilibrium price in the market? Add a binding price control in your model above.

Assuming the price control you have shown in your model is enacted, identify the area in your model that represents the deadweight loss to society as a result of the price control, and then explain in 1-2 sentences what DWL means.

Assuming the price control you have shown in your model is enacted, identify the area in your model that represents the area of producer surplus that is transferred to consumers (i.e. the restaurants) as a result of the price control.

Even though some surplus is reallocated to restaurants as a result of this price control, explain in 2-3 sentences why not all restaurants will benefit from this price control.

Refer back to the title of the article. What does “iron fist” and “invisible hand” mean in reference to possible market outcomes? Explain in 2-3 sentences.

(25 points) Many firms are experiencing unusual production right now as the COVID-19 pandemic has reached every part of our economy. Read The Wall Street Journal article “Chipotle’s Profit More Than Doubles as Chain’s Burritos Get Pricier”, and discuss each of the following points in a minimum of 2 complete sentences each:

According to the law of demand, if Chipotle increases prices of burritos, what will happen to the quantity demanded of burritos?

According to the article, what type of costs, fixed or variable, have been responsible for driving up total costs of production for Chipotle?

Given that profit and costs have both increased for Chipotle, what does that imply about revenue earned by Chipotle?

Given your answer to part c (and the fact that Chipotle’s prices have increased), what can be said about the price elasticity of demand for Chipotle’s products? Furthermore, what can be said about the relative sizes of the change in quantity (discussed in part a.) versus the change in price?

Assume Chipotle is operating in a monopolistically competitive market. Even though Chipotle is earning positive profits in the short run, explain why the firm would (theoretically) earn zero economic profit in the long run.

(25 points) The last few chapters in the semester focus on different market structures and the different outcomes observed in each market structure. This last article focuses on two firms operating in the book publishing market, which is arguably an Oligopoly. Read The Wall Street Journal article “Justice Department Sues to Block Penguin Random House’s Acquisition of Simon & Schuster”, and answer the following questions in a minimum of 2 complete sentences each:

Generally speaking, what is the main goal of antitrust laws, and what entity in the US is tasked with enforcing antitrust laws?

How would this merger affect authors of books?

How would this merger affect consumers of books? Be sure to mention the effects on quantity of output, quality/variety of output, and prices to consumers.

Why do the two publishers argue this move is not anticompetitive?

Imagine you are an economic consultant to the Department of Justice for this case. Would you recommend the DOJ allow the merger, or would you recommend the DOJ stop this merger? Note: This is an opinion-based question, so there is no right or wrong answer, but you must justify your answer.[supanova_question]

Optional R Assignment Goal: You are going to use the code we

Optional R Assignment

Goal: You are going to use the code we used in class and apply it to a new dataset (GambleRC.csv) with trend and seasonality features. The dataset contains the quarterly sales of the gambling and recreational industry of the United States from 2009 to 2021.

Instructions:

The majority of the code will stay the same; however, you are expected to make some changes so that we know you truly understand the code.

Step 1: Watch the zoom video to see the meanings of each line of code that we didn’t get to explain during class.

Step 2: Load the GambleRC.csv file into Rstudio with the relevant code, and change the name of the columns, and then only choose the observations from 2009-Q1 to 2019-Q3.

Because the sales/value (2nd column)’s data type is characters (not numbers), you need to convert the 2nd column into numbers by adding the following 2 lines of code after line 7 in the code file.

data1$sales <- gsub(",","",data1$sales)

data1$sales <- as.numeric(data1$sales)

Step 3: The rest of the steps are generally the same. But you are expected to make some minor changes to the code:

Dummy variables are changed to Mar, June and Sep this time

Change the color of Actual Y (data1$sales) to “green”

Step 4:

Create a word document, and paste all of the graphs you created and the summary of the regression model into the file.

And answer this question: does the residual plot of model1 look ok to you? Why or why not?

*Note: If you run into bugs and cannot fix it, and cannot generate any output, you can paste your adjusted code into the word file instead, and you will receive partial credit.[supanova_question]

Accounting Question

While I take this I will be sending you pictures of the questions as I go so you can begin solving. I NEED YOU TO BE TIMELY. PLEASE send the questions back to me one by one rather then all at once. There is also a time limit which will be 1 HOUR. Once we begin I cannot stop or pause it so it’s crucial you are there and ready once I begin. This will consist of 23 questions most multiple choice but also a couple workout problems. I will be working on this through connect mcgraw. Let me know if there is anything you don’t understand or if you have any questions. I would like to start at 11pm MTN time. I can be flexible with the start time but once again once I start I cannot pause or stop it so I need you there actively with me.

done
Seen
3 mins ago[supanova_question]

Industrialization and the actions of the Progressives

1) Directions: Imagine that you are the mayor or governor of a major industrial city or state. Using your knowledge on the problems caused by Industrialization and the actions of the Progressives, which of the four Progressive reform categories would you devote your state’s time and money to fixing? In your response include:
The Progressive reform category you would devote your money to fixing
3 pieces of evidence from class to support your decision
2) Directions: Choose two of the three Progressives you researched and create a Venn Diagram to compare and contrast the following:
Impact of the Reformers
Tactics of the Reformers
Goal of the Reformers
Legacy of the Reformers
Other relevant information
Your Venn Diagram should include 3-5 pieces of detail in each section. It made either be hand-drawn or created via computer.
[supanova_question]

Sociology Question

OverviewAgeism is a serious and real issue in contemporary society. Social scientists and gerontologists spend a great deal of time identifying, researching, and reflecting on how to make society and social interactions a more age-friendly, equal place for all. A key element of working in the field of aging is communicating your knowledge and insights to others, which is often done through written communication. The video above gives a brief overview of a reflection essay, which is the goal of this assignment. A more detailed tutorial is available in the resources section below and explains in detail how to tackle this type of writing assignment–consider it a must-watch!ScenarioYou are a writer for Growing Old Rocks! magazine. As their content expert on ageism, your editor has asked you to read and reflect on the latest book, This Chair Rocks by Ashton Applewhite. They want you to create an APA-style reflection essay describing the main ideas in the book, relating and analyzing the main ideas in light of your personal experience, course content, and/or current events/issues, and reflecting on how your beliefs and/or behaviors have been affected by the book. ObjectivesIn this paper, show me you can: * Recognize and evaluate ageism, including the causes, at-risk populations, and appropriate intervention strategies * Engage in meaningful self-reflection * Create an APA style reflection essay
Technical Requirements *4-5 pages college-level English reflection essay in APA Style Student Paper (Links to an external site.) format. Title and reference page(s) do not count toward the page minimum. Note: Student papers do not have an abstract. * Standard 10-12 pt. font should be used (e.g. Times New Roman, Arial, Tahoma, etc.). UPDATE–No sources outside Applewhite and Hillier and Barrow are required, but if used, they must be cited in-text and in references in APA style. * Accurate in-text citations and references in APA style, 7th edition (Links to an external site.). *Paraphrasing of sources is recommended; use direct quotes sparingly. * Every paper will be checked for plagiarism; see resources below for how to recognize and avoid plagiarism.

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intrapreneur / 8 step process

Part 1:Prior to beginning work on this discussion forum, read Part 1: Changing the Status Quo from the course textbook The Greenhouse Approach: Cultivating Intrapreneurship in Companies and Organizations. Additionally, read the following articles The Irrational Side of Change Management (Links to an external site.) and 1 Reason Why Most Change Management Efforts Fail (Links to an external site.). Note the reference to the estimated 70% failure rate for change.
Next, reflect on the following observation by Niccolo Machiavelli:
It must be remembered that there is nothing more difficult to plan, more doubtful of success, nor more dangerous to manage than a new system. For the initiator has the enmity of all who would profit by the preservation of the old institution and merely lukewarm defenders in those who gain by the new ones. – The Prince
Intrapreneurs are change agents and initiate outward change (products and services) and inward change (policies, procedures, technology). Assess the information in the above articles and Part 1 of the course textbook and then do the following:
Determine the environment needed for beneficial intrapreneurial activities. Do this by devising a minimum of three principles you feel are the foundation for a beneficial intrapreneurial environment.
The two articles offered above suggest there is an estimated 70% failure rate for organization change implementation efforts. Based on what you know about intrapreneurial activities, defend the use of nimble change management techniques to reduce the estimated 70% failure rate previously mentioned.
Offer a link to a video or an article that provides additional information about intrapreneurs as change agents, as well as effective change management procedures
Part 2:
Prior to beginning work on this discussion forum, read Part 1: Changing the Status Quo from the course textbook The Greenhouse Approach: Cultivating Intrapreneurship in Companies and Organizations. Additionally, read about John Kotter’s eight-step method for implementing change on the webpage 8 Step Process (Links to an external site.). Pay attention to the material offered about principles versus rules.
As a matter of course, we all encounter rules that govern our actions in our business environment. We are accustomed to rules and more or less follow them and seldom seriously question them. Following rules provides stability and predictability; however, rules can potentially stifle innovation. When, for example, core competencies become core rigidities, innovation halts and stagnation flourishes.
After retrieving and reading the information about the eight-step method and reading the information in the assigned textbook (emphasis on the material about principles versus rules), do the following:
Assess Kotter’s proposed method as principles used to guide actions. Is Kotter’s method flexible enough to develop effective change management procedures across several cultures or is it specific to the point that there seems to be only one way to manage change? For example, is there only one way to create a sense of urgency?
Estimate the level of effort it might take to transition from a rules-based environment to a principle-informing-rules environment. What are two major obstacles that might be encountered?
Offer a link to a video or an article that provides additional information about principles informing rules, as well as effective change management procedures.

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3 mins ago[supanova_question]

Chapter 5 and 6 of How to study as a Mathematics Major

Chapter 5 and 6 of How to study as a Mathematics Major

These two chapters are about proof and this discussion board question will ask you to reflect on your experiences with proof.

Discuss your experiences in high school with proof by describing the overall expectations that you were required to have with proofs, your experience with proofs while learning and reading mathematics, and your thoughts about whether proofs should be a part of high school mathematics. Give examples as much as possible.

Discuss your experiences with proof as an early college student by describing the overall expectations that you were required to have with proofs, your experience with proofs while learning and reading mathematics, and your thoughts about whether proofs should be a part early on in college mathematics. Give examples as much as possible.

Discuss moving forward in your college career with regards to prove. What have you learned this semester that will serve you well moving forward? What are some issues with proofs you are still struggling with and how will you approach overcoming these issues moving forward? Do you have a different view about proofs after this class? Why or Why not? Finally, how will your background with proofs serve you as you move forward in future mathematics classes? Provide examples as appropriate.[supanova_question]

Chapter 3 and 4 of the book: How to Study as a

Chapter 3 and 4 of the book: How to Study as a Mathematics Major

Chapter 3 and 4 of the book “How to Study as a Mathematics Major” discusses defintions and theorems and gives multiple of examples that you come across while study mathematics courses such as calculus and introduction to proofs. When faced with a definition and working to understand the definition, you should consider examples that satisfy the definition and also examples that do not. This will help you with the abstract concepts in the definition as you build your understanding.

To approach this chapter, we present a definition that most of you have not seen before.

Definition: Let f be a real-valued function from the real numbers to the real numbers. Then the function f is called fine if it has a root (zero) at each integer. In other words, f is fine if for each integer n, f(n) = 0.

What are some of the key words in this definition that you have seen before in mathematics? State each key word and what it means.

Now, write down at least two examples of functions that are fine. Write down at least two examples of functions that are not fine. Describe how this helps you to understand the definition of a fine function. Also, describe issues that you still have in understanding this definition.

Most usually your examples are continuous functions. Write down two examples that is not continuous. Write down two examples that are not differentiable.

Describe your thoughts about a problem like this and how comfortable you would be in proving statements involving fine functions. What obstacles would you be faced with when proving such statements. For example, prove or disprove that the sum of two fine functions is also a fine function.[supanova_question]

Chapter 5 and 6 of How to study as a Mathematics Major

Chapter 5 and 6 of How to study as a Mathematics Major

These two chapters are about proof and this discussion board question will ask you to reflect on your experiences with proof.

Discuss your experiences in high school with proof by describing the overall expectations that you were required to have with proofs, your experience with proofs while learning and reading mathematics, and your thoughts about whether proofs should be a part of high school mathematics. Give examples as much as possible.

Discuss your experiences with proof as an early college student by describing the overall expectations that you were required to have with proofs, your experience with proofs while learning and reading mathematics, and your thoughts about whether proofs should be a part early on in college mathematics. Give examples as much as possible.

Discuss moving forward in your college career with regards to prove. What have you learned this semester that will serve you well moving forward? What are some issues with proofs you are still struggling with and how will you approach overcoming these issues moving forward? Do you have a different view about proofs after this class? Why or Why not? Finally, how will your background with proofs serve you as you move forward in future mathematics classes? Provide examples as appropriate.[supanova_question]

Rough Draft Due: 9/29 Final Draft Due: 10/3 Paper Length: 3-4 Pages Format: Typed, Double-Spaced, 12 pt. Times New Essay

Rough Draft Due: 9/29 Final Draft Due: 10/3 Paper Length: 3-4 Pages Format: Typed, Double-Spaced, 12 pt. Times New Essay

I’ve attached all the instructions, links, sources, etc. Feel free to contact me with any questions. To keep it

I’ve attached all the instructions, links, sources, etc. Feel free to contact me with any questions. To keep it. I’ve attached all the instructions, links, sources, etc. Feel free to contact me with any questions. To keep it.

I’ve attached all the instructions, links, sources, etc. Feel free to contact me with any questions. To keep it simple, it’s a literary analysis of MLK’s I Have A Dream Speech. using four secondary sources(which I’ve provided in the attached document) It must be a minimum 600 words, and must be in MLA format[supanova_question]

EDSP 521 Exceptionality Chart Grading Rubric Criteria Levels of Achievement Content Advanced

EDSP 521

Exceptionality Chart Grading Rubric

Criteria

Levels of Achievement

Content

Advanced

Proficient

Developing

Not present

Definition

6 points

Application of knowledge demonstrated regarding the full and correct definition of all 7 exceptionalities.

5 points

Application of knowledge demonstrated regarding the full and correct definition of exceptionalities, with vague definition on 1-2 exceptionalities.

1 to 4 points

Application of knowledge demonstrated regarding the full and correct definition of exceptionalities, with vague or incorrect definition on one or more exceptionalities.

0 points

More than 4 definitions were incomplete/incorrect.

Criteria for Services

18 to 20 points

Application of knowledge demonstrated regarding the criteria for services in all 14 exceptionalities.

17 points

Application of knowledge demonstrated regarding the criteria for services in 13 exceptionalities, or 1-2 vague criterion.

1 to 16 points

Application of knowledge demonstrated regarding the criteria for services in 11-12 exceptionalities, or 3-4 vague criterion.

0 points

More than 4 incomplete sections on the criteria for services.

Characteristics

18 to 20 points

Application of knowledge demonstrated regarding the characteristics in all 14 exceptionalities.

17 points

Application of knowledge demonstrated regarding the characteristics in 13 exceptionalities, or 1-2 vague or incorrect characteristics.

1 to 16 points

Application of knowledge demonstrated regarding the characteristics in 11-12 exceptionalities, or 3-4 vague or incorrect characteristics.

0 points

More than 4 incomplete sections on the characteristics of these exceptionalities.

Teaching methods/Strategies/Technology

18 to 20 points

Application of knowledge demonstrated regarding the strategies for all 14 exceptionalities.

17 points

Application of knowledge demonstrated regarding the strategies in 13 exceptionalities, or 1-2 vague or incorrect strategies.

1 to 16 points

Application of knowledge demonstrated regarding the strategies in 11-12 exceptionalities, or 3-4 vague or incorrect strategies.

0 points

More than 4 incomplete sections on the strategies for these exceptionalities.

Structure

Advanced

Proficient

Developing

Not present

Correct spelling, grammar, and capitalization are used.

18 to 20 points

Application of correct spelling, grammar, and capitalization used throughout.

17 points

There are 1–2 glaring errors in spelling, grammar, or capitalization.

1 to 16 points

There are 3–4 glaring errors in spelling, grammar, or capitalization.

0 points

There are more than 4 glaring errors in spelling, grammar, or capitalization.

Current APA

9 points

Application of current APA formatting in the areas of title page, citations, and Reference page

8 points

There are 1–2 glaring errors in current APA formatting

1 to 7 points

There are 3–4 glaring errors in current APA formatting

0 points

There are more than 4 glaring errors in current APA formatting

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1 EXCEPTIONALITY CHART 1 Exceptionality Chart Student Name Course Identifier/School Author’s Note

I’ve attached all the instructions, links, sources, etc. Feel free to contact me with any questions. To keep it 1

EXCEPTIONALITY CHART

1

Exceptionality Chart

Student Name
Course Identifier/School

Author’s Note

Insert content here

Exceptionality Chart

Exceptionality

&

Definition

Criteria For

Services

Characteristics

General Teaching Methods/

Instructional Strategies/ Technology

Autism Spectrum Disorder

“A variety (or spectrum) of related disorders that affect a child’s social development and ability to communicate and that include unusual behavioral manifestations such as repetitive motor movements” (Kirk et al., 2020, p. 143).

“DSM-5

An individual must meet criteria A, B, C, and D:

Persistent deficits in social communication and social interaction across contexts, not accounted for by general developmental delays.

Restrictive, repetitive patterns of behaviors, interests, or activities.

Symptoms must be present in early childhood (but may not become fully manifest until social demands exceed limited capacities).

Symptoms together limit and impair everyday functioning” (Kirk et al., 2020, p. 146).

“Lack of Theory of the Mind (the ability of human beings to understand the thinking and feelings of other people that’s necessary for understanding, predicting, and shaping the behavior of others).

Acting out or aggressive behavior due to limited ability to communicate.

Hypersensitivity to sensory stimuli

Trouble with important thinking skills like decision-making, problem solving, executive function, and the more complex mental processes of reasoning and evaluation.

Difficulty with a range of motor skills such as gross motor, fine motor, and motor planning” (Kirk et al., 2020, pp. 148-150).

“Early intervention and early diagnosis

Naturalistic intervention Peer-mediated instruction and intervention

Social narratives of social stories; Comic strip conversations

Prompting; visual supports

Creating Structure

Improving Social Skills

Functional Behavior Assessment

Assistive Technology (voice output communication aids)

Focused Intervention Practice

Comprehensive Treatment Models (TEACCH, EIBI)” (Kirk et al., 2020, pp. 154-161).

Emotional/Behavioral Disability

Hearing Impairment/Deaf

Intellectual Disability

Learning Disability

Multiple Disabilities

“Concomitant impairments (such as intellectual and developmental disabilities—blindness or intellectual and developmental disabilities—orthopedic impairment) that result in severe educational needs that require special services” (Kirk et al., 2020, p. 423).

Orthopedic Impairment

“A severe orthopedic impairment that adversely affects a child’s educational performance (e.g., cerebral palsy, amputations, and fractures or burns that cause contractures)” (Kirk et al., 2020, p. 423).

Traumatic Brain Injury

“An acquired injury caused by an external physical force, resulting in total or partial functional disability and/or psychosocial impairment that requires special educational services” (Kirk et al., 2020, p. 423).

Visual Impairment, including Blindness and Deafblindness

Deafblindness: “Concomitant hearing and visual impairments, the combination of which causes severe communication, developmental, and other educational needs that require special services” (Kirk et al., 2020, p. 423).

Other Health Impairment

“Limited strength, vitality, or alertness, including heightened alertness to environmental stimuli, that are due to chronic or acute health problems such as asthma, attention deficit disorders, diabetes, epilepsy, cystic fibrosis, heart conditions, hemophilia, lead poisoning, leukemia, nephritis, ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease, rheumatic fever, sickle cell anemia, or Tourette syndrome and that require special educational services” (Kirk et al., 2020, p. 423).

Developmental Delays

“In the United States, defined by each state, and can occur in any of the five critical domains: cognitive, communicative, social-emotional, motor, and adaptive development” (Kirk et al., 2020, p. 79).

Language Developmental Disorder OR Speech/Language Impairment

“This disorder involves difficulties with any combination of spoken, written, and symbol systems used to share ideas and messages. Language disorders may impact understanding and use of (a) language form (phonology, morphology, syntax), (b) language content (semantics), or (c) language function (pragmatics)” (Kirk et al., 2020, p. 293).

Cultural/ Ethnic/ Socioeconomic Factors/ ELL

“Many students for whom English is a second language have difficulty learning in American schools and may be referred to special education as a result” (Kirk et al., 2020, p. 57).

The criteria for services should be the same for the exceptionality of a student with English as the primary language as it is for a student with English as a second language.

Students who fall under the characteristics of a specific disability, but also who have other cultural/ethnic/socioeconomic factors or variables.

Test students with nonbiased assessment that include the use of interpreters, “culture fair” tests, and separate norms. (Kirk et al, 2015, p. 56).

Mindful interpretations of the tests.

“The RtI model Tier II, which allows for additional support for learning short of referral to special education” (Kirk et al., 2020, p. 57).

Medical Aspects/Major Health Impairments

A broad range of exceptionalities that involve medical attention/care.

“When children are dealing with serious health problems, their life and education will be impacted. The support needed for each child will depend on the range and severity of the problem…medical experts take the lead on the diagnosis and planning medical interventions, while the general education teacher takes responsibility for needed daily supports and for knowing the appropriate protocols for initial response in an emergency” (Kirk et al., 2020, p. 427).

A wide variety of medical health impairments that could include:

Asthma

Cancer

Sickle Cell Anemia

HIV/AIDS

Acquired Diseases

“Advances in medicine have led to lifesaving interventions for children with physical disabilities and health impairments. As medical interventions have improved, the life expectancy for children with severe disabilities has been extended. Improved medical interventions are also increasing the survival rate for soldiers who have been wounded…medical supports also can enhance the quality of individuals who have lost limbs regain functioning, new blood sugar monitors can maintain a continuous check to help regular diabetes, improvements in surgical procedures for infants allow doctors to repair heart defects, and new treatments for cancer have led to nearly 80 percent survival rates for children” (Kirk et al., 2020, p. 421).

References

Kirk, S., Gallagher, J., Coleman, M., Hardman, M., Egan, M. W., Drew, C., Gargiulo, R., Metcalf, D., Boyle, J., Scanlon, D., &

Landrum, J. (2020). Foundations of Exceptionality. Cengage.[supanova_question]

What role do you think accounting plays in helping owners (shareholder) decide Dick’s value?

Consider Dick’s stock price. On January 30, 2017, you would pay $52.17 to own one share of Dick’s stock. When you add the value of all the shares of stock together, Dick’s is valued at over $4 billion . That’s a lot of money. Do you think Dick’s is worth that much money? What role do you think accounting plays in helping owners (shareholder) decide Dick’s value?

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Excerpts from Mindset: The New Psychology of Success by Carol S. Dweck.

Excerpts from Mindset: The New Psychology of Success by Carol S. Dweck.

Publisher’s description: After decades of research, world-renowned Stanford University psychologist Carol S. Dweck, PhD discovered a simple, but groundbreaking idea: the power of mindset. In this brilliant book, she shows how success in school, work, sports, the arts, and almost every area of human endeavor can be dramatically influenced by how we think about our talents and abilities. People with a fixed mindset—those who think that abilities are fixed—are less likely to flourish than those with a growth mindset—those who believe that abilities can be developed. Mindset reveals how great parents, teachers, managers, and athletes can put this idea to use to foster outstanding accomplishment. With the right mindset, you can motivate those you lead, teach, and love—to transform their lives and your own.

Endorsement from Bill Gates—“Through clever research studies and engaging writing, Dweck illuminates how our beliefs about our capabilities exert tremendous influence on how we learn and which paths we take in life.” Bill Gates, Gates Notes

Chapter 2: Inside the Mindsets

One day my doctoral student, Mary Bandura, and I were trying to understand why some students were so caught up in proving their ability, while others could just let go and learn. Suddenly we realized that there were two meanings to ability, not one: a fixed ability that needs to be proven, and a changeable ability that can be developed through learning.

That’s how mindsets were born. I knew instantly which one I had. I realized why I’d always been so concerned about mistakes and failures. And I recognized for the first time that I had a choice.

When you enter a mindset, you enter a new world. In one world—the world of fixed traits—success is about proving you’re smart or talented. Validating yourself. In the other—the world of changing qualities—it’s about stretching yourself to learn something new. Developing yourself.

In one world, failure is about having a setback. Getting a bad grade. Losing a tournament. Getting fired. Getting rejected. It means you’re not smart or talented. In the other world, failure is about not growing. Not reaching for the things you value. It means you’re not fulfilling your potential.

In one world, effort is a bad thing. It, like failure, means you’re not smart or talented. If you were, you wouldn’t need effort. In the other world, effort is what makes you smart or talented.

You have a choice. Mindsets are just beliefs. They’re powerful beliefs, but they’re just something in your mind, and you can change your mind. As you read, think about where you’d like to go and which mindset will take you there.

Is success about learning—or proving you’re smart?

Benjamin Barber, an eminent political theorist, once said, “I don’t divide the world into the weak and the strong, or the successes and the failures, …I divide the world into the learners and nonlearners.”

What on earth would make someone a nonlearner? Everyone is born with an intense drive to learn. Infants stretch their skills daily. Not just ordinary skills, but the most difficult tasks of a lifetime, like learning to walk and talk. They never decide it’s too hard or not worth the effort. Babies don’t worry about making mistakes or humiliating themselves. They walk, they fall, they get up. They just barge forward.

What could put an end to this exuberant learning? The fixed mindset. As soon as children become able to evaluate themselves, some of them become afraid of challenges. They become afraid of not being smart. I have studies thousands of people from preschoolers on, and it’s breathtaking how many reject an opportunity to learn.

We offered four-year-olds a choice: they could redo an easy jigsaw puzzle or they could try a harder one. Even at this tender age, children with the fixed mindset—the ones who believed in fixed traits—stuck with the safe one. Kids who are born smart “don’t do mistakes,” they told us.

Children with the growth mindset—the ones who believed you could get smarter—thought it was a strange choice. Why are you asking me this, lady? Why would anyone want to keep doing the same puzzle over and over? They chose one hard one after another. “I’m dying to figure them out!” exclaimed one little girl.

So children with the fixed mindset want to make sure they succeed. Smart people should always succeed. But for children with the growth mindset, success is about stretching themselves. It’s about becoming smarter.

One seventh-grade girl summed it up. “I think intelligence is something you have to work for…it isn’t just given to you…Most kids, if they’re not sure of an answer, will not raise their hand to answer the question. But what I usually do is raise my hand, because if I’m wrong, then my mistake will be corrected. Or I will raise my hand and say, ‘How would this be solved?’ or ‘I don’t get this. Can you help me?’ Just by doing that I’m increasing my intelligence.”

Beyond Puzzles

It’s one thing to pass up a puzzle. It’s another to pass up an opportunity that’s important to your future. To see if this would happen, we took advantage of an unusual situation. At the University of Hong Kong, everything is in English. Classes are in English, textbooks are in English, and exams are in English. But some students who enter the university are not fluent in English, so it would make sense for them to do something about it in a hurry.

As students arrived to register for their freshman year, we knew which ones were not skilled in English. And we asked them a key question: If the faculty offered a course for students who need to improve their English skills, would you take it?

We also measured their mindset. We did this by asking them how much they agreed with statements like this: “You have a certain amount of intelligence, and you can’t really do much to change it.” People who agreed with this kind of statement lean toward a fixed mindset. Those who lean toward a growth mindset agree that: “You can always substantially change how intelligent you are.”

Later, we looked at who said yes to the English course. Students with the growth mindset said an emphatic yes. But those with the fixed mindset were not very interested. Believing that success is about learning, students with the growth mindset seized the chance. But those with the fixed mindset didn’t want to expose their deficiencies. Instead, to feel smart in the short run, they were willing to put their college careers at risk.

This is how the fixed mindset makes people into nonlearners.

Chapter 3: The Truth about Ability and Accomplishment

The danger of praise and positive labels

If people have such potential to achieve, how can they gain faith in their potential? How can we give them the confidence they need to go for it? How about praising their ability in order to convey that they have what it takes? In fact, more than 80% of parents told us it was necessary to praise children’s ability so as to foster their confidence and achievement. You know, it makes a lot of sense.

But then we begin to worry. We thought about how people with the fixed mindset already focus too much on their ability. “Is it high enough?’ “Will it look good?” Wouldn’t praising people’s ability focus them on it even more? Wouldn’t it be telling them that that’s what we value and, even worse, that we can read their deep, underlying ability from their performance? Isn’t that teaching them the fixed mindset?

Adam Guettel has been called the crown prince and savior of musical theater. He is the grandson of Richard Rodgers, the man who wrote the music to such classics as Oklahoma! and Carousel. Guettel’s mother gushes about her son’s genius. So does everyone else. “The talent is there and it’s major,” raved a review in The New York Times. The question is whether this kind of praise encourages people.

What’s great about research is that you can ask these kinds of questions and then go get the answers. So we conducted studies with hundreds of students, mostly early adolescents. We first gave each student a set of ten fairly difficult problems from a nonverbal IQ test. They mostly did pretty well on these, and when they finished we praised them.

We praised some of the students for their ability. They were told: “Wow, you got eight right. That’s a really good score. You must be smart at this.” They were in the Adam Guettel you’re so talented position.

We praised other students for their effort: “Wow, you got eight right. That’s a really good score. You must have worked really hard.” They were not made to feel that they had some special gift; they were praised for doing what it takes to succeed.

Both groups were exactly equal to begin with. But right after the praise, they began to differ. As we feared, the ability praise pushed students right into the fixed mindset, and they showed all the signs of it too. When we gave them a choice, they rejected a challenging new task that they could learn from. They didn’t want to do anything that could expose their flaws and call into question their talent.

When Guettel was 13, he was all set to star in a Metropolitan Opera broadcast and TV movie of Amahl and the Night Visitors. He bowed out, saying that his voice had broken. “I kind of faked that my voice was changing….I didn’t want to handle the pressure.”

In contrast, when students were praised for effort, 90% of them wanted the challenging new task that they could learn from. Then we gave the students some hard new problems, which they didn’t do so well on. The ability kids now thought they were not smart after all. If success had meant they were intelligent, then less-than-success meant they were deficient.

Guettel echoes this. “In my family, to be good is to fail. To be very good is to fail…The only thing not a failure is to be great.”

The effort kids simply thought the difficulty meant “Apply more effort or try new strategies.” They didn’t see it as a failure, and they didn’t think it reflected on their intellect.

What about the students’ enjoyment of the problems? After the success, everyone loved the problems, but after the difficult problems, the ability students said it wasn’t fun anymore. It can’t be fun when your claim to fame, your special talent, is in jeopardy.

Here’s Adam Guettel: “I wish I could just have fun and relax and not the responsibility of that potential to be some kind of great man.” As with the kids in our study, the burden of talent was killing his enjoyment.

The effort-praised students still loved the problems, and many of them said that the hard problems were the most fun.

We then looked at the students’ performance. After the experience with difficulty, the performance of the ability-praised students plummeted, even when we gave them some more of the easier problems. Losing faith in their ability, they were doing worse than when they started. The effort kids showed better and better performance. They had used the hard problems to sharpen their skills, so that when they returned to the easier ones, they were way ahead.

Since this was a kind of IQ test, you might say that praising ability lowered the students’ IQs. And that praising their efforts raised them.

Guettel was not thriving. He was riddled with obsessive-compulsive tics and bitten, bleeding fingers. “Spend a minute with him—it takes only one—and a picture of the terror behind the tics starts to emerge,” says an interviewer. Guettel has also fought serious, recurrent drug problems. Rather than empowering him, the “gift” has filled him with fear and doubt. Rather than fulfilling his talent, this brilliant composer has spent most of his life running from it.

One thing is hopeful—his recognition that he has his own life course to follow that is not dictated by other people and their view of his talent. One night he had a dream about his grandfather. “I was walking him to an elevator. I asked him if I was any good. He said, rather kindly, ‘You have your own voice.”

Is that voice finally emerging? For the score of The Light in the Piazza, an intensely romantic musical, Guettel won the 2005 Tony Award. Will he take it as praise for talent or praise for effort? I hope it is the latter.

There was one more finding in our study that was striking and depressing at the same time. We said to each student: “You know, we’re going to go to other schools and I bet the kids in those schools would like to know about the problems.” So we gave students a page to write out their thoughts, but we also left a space for them to write the scores they had received on the problems.

Would you believe that almost 40% of the ability-praised students lied about their scores? And always in one direction. In the fixed mindset, imperfections are shameful—especially if you’re talented—so they lied them away. What’s so alarming is that we took ordinary children and made them into liars, simply by telling them they were smart.

Right after I wrote these paragraphs, I met with a young man who tutors students for their College Board exams. He had come to consult with me about one of his students. This student takes practice tests and then lies to him about her score. He is supposed to tutor her on what she doesn’t know, but she can’t tell him the truth about what she doesn’t know! And she is paying money for this.

So telling children they’re smart, in the end, made them feel dumber and act dumber, but claim they were smarter. I don’t think this is what we’re aiming for when we put positive labels—“gifted,” “talented,” “brilliant,”—on people. We don’t mean to rob them of their zest for challenge and their recipes for success. But that’s the danger.

Here is a letter from a man who’d read some of my work:

Dear Dr. Dweck,

It was painful to read your chapter…as I recognized myself therein. As a child I was a member of The Gifted Child Society and continually praised for my intelligence. Now, after a lifetime of not living up to my potential (I’m 49), I’m learning to apply myself to a task. And also to see failure not as a sign of stupidity but as a lack of experience and skill. Your chapter helped me see myself in a new light.

Seth Abrams

This is the danger of positive labels. There are alternatives, and I will return to them later in the chapter on parents, teachers, and coaches.

Chapter 5: Business, Mindset and Leadership

The Smartest Guys in the Room

Yes, it seems as though history led inevitably from Iacocca to the moguls of the 1990s, and none more so than Kenneth Lay and Jeffrey Skilling, the leaders of Enron.

Ken Lay, the company’s founder, chairman, and CEO, considered himself a great visionary. According to Bethany McLean and Peter Elkind, authors of The Smartest Guys in the Room, Lay looked down his nose at the people who actually made the company run, much the way a king might look at his serfs. He looked down on Rich Kinder, the Enron president, who rolled up his sleeves and tried to make sure the company would reach its earning targets. Kinder was the man who made Lay’s royal lifestyle possible. Kinder was also the only person at the top who constantly asked if they were fooling themselves: “Are we smoking our own dope? Are we drinking our own whiskey?”

Naturally, his days were numbered. But in his sensible and astute way, as he departed he arranged to buy the one Enron asset that was inherently valuable, the energy pipelines—the asset that Enron held in disdain. By the end of 2003, Kinder’s company had a market value of $7 billion.

Even as Lay was consumed by his view of himself and the regal manner in which he wished to support it, he wanted to be seen as a “good and thoughtful man” with a credo of respect and integrity. Even as Enron sucked the life out of its victims, he wrote to his staff, “Ruthlessness, callousness and arrogance don’t belong here….We work with customers and prospects openly, honestly and sincerely.” As with Iacocca and the others, the perception—usually Wall Street’s perception—was all-important. The reality less so.

Right there with Lay was Jeff Skilling, successor to Rich Kinder as president and chief operating officer, and later the CEO. Skilling was not just smart, he was said to be “the smartest person I ever met” and “incandescently brilliant.” He used his brainpower, however, not to learn, but to intimidate. When he thought he was smarter than others, which was almost always, he treated them harshly. And anyone who disagreed with him was just not bright enough to “get it.” When a co-CEO with superb management skills was brought in to help Skilling during a hard time in his life, Skilling was contemptuous of him: “Ron doesn’t get it.” When financial analysts or Wall Street traders tried to press Skilling to go beyond his pat explanations, he treated them as though they were stupid. “Well, it’s so obvious. How can you not get it.” In most cases, the Wall Street guys, ever concerned about their own intellect, made believe they got it.

As resident genius, Skilling had unlimited faith in his ideas. He had so much regard for his ideas that he believe Enron should be able to proclaim profits as soon as he or his people had the idea that might lead to profits. This is a radical expression of the fixed mindset: My genius not only defines and validates me. It defines and validates the company. It is what creates value. My genius is profit. Wow!

And in fact, this is how Enron came to operate. As McLean and Elkind report, Enron recorded “millions of dollars in profits on a business before it had generated a penny in actual revenues.” Of course, after the creative act no one cared about follow-through. That was beneath them. So, often as not, the profit never occurred. If genius equaled profit, it didn’t matter that Enron people sometimes wasted millions competing against each other. Said Amanda Martin, an Enron executive, “To put one over on one of your own was a sign of creativity and greatness.”

Skilling not only thought he was smarter than everyone else but, like Iacocca, also thought he was luckier. According to insiders, he thought he could beat the odds. Why should he feel vulnerable? There was never anything wrong. Skilling still does not admit that there was anything wrong. The world simply didn’t get it.

Two Geniuses Collide

Resident geniuses almost brought down AOL and Time Warner, too. Steve Case of AOL and Jerry Levin of Time Warner were two CEOs with the fixed mindset who merged their companies. Can you see it coming?

Case and Levin had a lot in common. Both of them cultivated an aura of supreme intelligence. Both tried to intimidate people with their brilliance. And both were known to take more credit than they deserved. As resident geniuses, neither wanted to hear complaints, and both were ready to fire people who weren’t “team players,” meaning people who wouldn’t keep up the façade that they had erected.

When the merger actually took place, AOL was in such debt that the merged company was on the brink of ruin. You would think that the CEOs might work together, marshaling their resources to save the company they created. Instead, Levin and Case scrambled for personal power.

Levin was the first to fall. But Case was still not trying to make things work. In fact, when the new CEO, Richard Parsons, sent someone down to fix AOL, Case was intensely against it. If someone else fixed AOL, someone else would get the credit. As with Iacocca, better to let the company collapse than let another prince be crowned. When Case was finally counseled to resign, he was furious. Like Iacocca, he denied all responsibility for the company’s problems and vowed to get back at those who had turned against him.

Because of the resident geniuses, AOL Time Warner ended the year 2002 with a loss of almost 100 billion dollars. It was the largest yearly loss in American history.

The Praised Generation Hits the Workforce

Are we going to have a problem finding leaders in the future? You can’t pick up a magazine or turn on the radio without hearing about the problem of praise in the workplace. We could have seen it coming.

We’ve talked about all the well-meaning parents who’ve tried to boost their children’s self-esteem by telling them how smart and talented they are. And we’ve talked about all the negative effects of this kind of praise. Well, these children of praise have now entered the workforce, and sure enough, many can’t function without getting a sticker for their every move. Instead of yearly bonuses, some companies are giving quarterly or even monthly bonuses. Instead of employee of the month, it’s the employee of the day. Companies are calling in consultants to teach them how best to lavish rewards on this overpraised generation. We no have a workforce full of people who need constant reassurance and can’t take criticism. Not a recipe for success in business, where taking on challenges, showing persistence, and admitting and correcting mistakes are essential.

Why are businesses perpetuating the problem? Why are they continuing the same misguided practices of the overpraising parents, and paying money to consultants to show them how to do it? Maybe we need to step back from this problem and take another perspective.

If the wrong kinds of praise leads kids down the path of entitlement, dependence, and fragility, maybe the right kinds of praise can lead them down the path of hard work and greater hardiness. We have shown in our research that with the right kinds of feedback even adults can be motivated to choose challenging tasks and confront their mistakes.

What would this feedback look or sound like in the workplace? Instead of just giving employees an award for the smartest idea or praise for a brilliant performance, they would get praise for taking initiative, for seeing a difficult task through, for struggling and learning something new, for being undaunted by a setback, or for being open to and acting on criticism. Maybe it could be praise for not needing constant praise!

Through a skewed sense of how to love their children, many parents in the ‘90s (and unfortunately, many parents of the ‘00s) abdicated their responsibility. Although corporations are not usually in the business of picking up where parents left off, they may need to this time. If businesses don’t play a role in developing a more mature and growth-minded workforce, where will the leaders of the future come from?

Chapter 8: Changing Mindsets

I was in the middle of first grade when my family moved. Suddenly I was in a new school. Everything was unfamiliar—the teacher, the students and the work. The work was what terrified me. The new class was way ahead of my old one, or at least it seemed that way to me. They were writing letters I hadn’t learned to write yet. And there was a way to do everything that everyone seemed to know except me. So when the teacher said, “Class, put your name on your paper in the right place,” I had no idea what she meant.

So I cried. Each day things came up that I didn’t know how to do. Each time, I felt lost and overwhelmed. Why didn’t I just say to the teacher, “Mrs. Kahn, I haven’t learned this yet. Could you show me how?”

In my work, I see lots of young children like this—bright, seemingly resourceful children who are paralyzed by setbacks. In some of our studies, they just have to take the simplest action to make things better. But they don’t. These are the young children with the fixed mindset. When things go wrong, they feel powerless and incapable.

Beliefs Are the Key to Happiness (and to Misery)

In the 1960s, psychiatrist Aaron Beck was working with his clients when he suddenly realized it was their beliefs that were causing their problems. Just before they felt a wave of anxiety or depression, something quickly flashed through their minds. It could be: “Dr. Beck thinks I’m incompetent.” Or “This therapy will never work. I’ll never feel better.” These kinds of beliefs caused their negative feelings not only in the therapy session, but in their lives, too.

They weren’t beliefs people were usually conscious of. Yet Beck found he could teach people to pay attention and hear them. And then he discovered he could teach them how to work with and change these beliefs. This is how cognitive therapy was born, one of the most effective therapies ever developed.

Whether they are aware of it or not, all people keep a running account of what’s happening to them, what it means, and what they should do. In other words, our minds are constantly monitoring and interpreting. That’s just how we stay on track. But sometimes the interpretation process goes awry. Some people put more extreme interpretations on things that happen—and then react with exaggerated feelings of anxiety, depression, or anger. Or superiority.

Mindsets frame the running account that’s taking place in people’s heads. They guide the whole interpretation process. The fixed mindset creates an internal monologue that is focused on judging. “This means I’m a loser.” “This means I’m a better person than they are.” “This means I’m a bad husband.” “This means my partner is selfish.”

In several studies, we probed the way people with a fixed mindset dealt with information they were receiving. We found that they put a very strong evaluation on each and every piece of information. Something good lead to a very strong positive label and something bad led to a very strong negative label.

People with a growth mindset are also constantly monitoring what’s going on, but their internal monologue is not about judging themselves and others in this way. Certainly they are sensitive to positive and negative information, but they’re attuned to its implications for learning and constructive action. What can I learn from this? How can I improve? How can I help my partner do this better?

Now, cognitive therapy basically teaches people to rein in their extreme judgments and make them more reasonable. For example, suppose Alana does poorly on a test and draws the conclusion, “I’m stupid.” Cognitive therapy would teach her to look more closely at the facts by asking, What is the evidence for and against your conclusion? Alana may, after prodding, come up with a long list of ways in which she has been competent in the past, and may then confess, “I guess I’m not as incompetent as I thought.”

She may also be encouraged to think of reasons she did poorly on the exam other than stupidity, and these may further temper her negative judgment. Alana is then taught how to do this for herself, so that when she judges herself negatively in the future, she can refute the judgment and feel better. In this way, cognitive therapy helps people make more realistic and optimistic judgments.

The Mindset Lectures

Just learning about the growth mindset can cause a big shift in the way people think about themselves and their lives. So each year in my undergraduate course, I teach about these mindsets—not only because they are part of the topic of the course but also because I know what pressure these students are under. Every year, students describe to me how these ideas have changed them in all areas of their lives.

Here is Maggie, the aspiring writer:

“I recognized that when it comes to artistic or creative endeavors I had internalized a fixed mindset. I believe that people were inherently artistic or creative and that you could not improve through effort. This directly affected my life because I have always wanted to be a writer, but have been afraid to pursue any writing classes or to share my creative writing with others. This is directly related to my mindset because any negative criticism would mean that I am not a writer inherently. I was too scared to expose myself to the possibility that I might not be a ‘natural.’

Now after listening to your lectures, I have decided to register for a creative writing class next term. And I feel that I have really come to understand what was preventing me from pursuing an interest that has long been my secret dream. I really feel this information has empowered me1”

Maggie’s internal monologue used to say, “Don’t do it. Don’t take a writing class. Don’t share your writing with others. It’s not worth the risk. Your dream could be destroyed. Protect it.”

Now it says, “Go for it. Make it happen. Develop your skills. Pursue your dream.”

And here is Jason, the athlete.

“As a student athlete at Columbia I had exclusively the fixed mindset. Winning was everything and learning did not enter the picture. However, after listening to your lectures, I realized that this is not a good mindset. I’ve been working on learning while I compete, under the realization that if I can continually improve, even in matches, I will become a much better athlete.”

Jason’s internal monologue used to be, “Win, win. You have to win. Prove yourself. Everything depends on it.”

Now it’s, “Observe. Learn. Improve. Become a better athlete.”

And finally, here’s Tony, the recovering genius:

“In high school I was able to get top grades with minimal studying and sleeping. I came to believe that it would always be so because I was naturally gifted with a superior understanding and memory. However, after about a year of sleep deprivation, my understanding and memory began to be not so superior anymore. When my natural talents, which I had come to depend on almost entirely for my self-esteem (as opposed to my ability to focus, my determination or my ability to work hard), came into question, I went through a personal crisis that lasted until a few weeks ago when you discussed the different mindsets in class. Understanding that a lot of my problems were the result of my preoccupation with proving myself to be ‘smart’ and avoiding failures has really helped me get out of the self-destructive pattern I was living in.”

Tony’s internal monologue went from, “I’m naturally gifted. I don’t need to study. I don’t need to sleep. I’m superior.”

To, “Uh-oh, I’m losing it. I don’t understand things. I can’t remember things. What am I now?”

To, “Don’t worry so much about being smart. Don’t worry so much about avoiding failures. That becomes self-destructive. Let’s start to study and sleep and get on with life.”

Of course, these people will have setbacks and disappointments, and sticking to the growth mindset may not always be easy. But just knowing it gave them another way to be. Instead of being held captive by some intimidating fantasy about the Great Writer, the Great Athlete, or the Great Genius, the growth mindset gave them courage to embrace their own goals and dreams. And more important, it gave them a way to work toward making them real.

Many people believe that a person is born either smart, average or dumb—and stays that way for life. But new research shows that the brain is more like a muscle—it changes and gets stronger when you use it. And scientists have been able to show just how the brain grows and gets stronger when you learn. The brain forms new connections and grows when people practice and learn new things.

When you learn new things, these tiny connections in the brain actually multiply and get stronger. The more that you challenge your mind to learn, the more your brain cells grow. Then, things that you once found very hard or even impossible—like speaking a foreign language or doing algebra—seem to become easy. The result is a stronger, smarter brain.

Nobody laughs at babies and says how dumb they are because they can’t talk. They just haven’t learned yet. The density of brain connections changes during the first years of life as babies pay attention, study their world, and learn how to do new things.[supanova_question]

GI532 Exam 2 Human Factor and Risk Management INSTRUCTIONS: Respond to each

GI532 Exam 2

Human Factor and Risk Management

INSTRUCTIONS:

Respond to each of the following questions in a memorandum as if responding to a question from a colleague who does not understand much about information assurance. Your answers should use 400 to 500 words and should be professional, as if you really were responding to a colleague. You may use a page layout in memo form if you find that psychologically helpful. You may not involve any other person in preparing these exam responses.

Question 1:

From: Lisa C. Bryson, CEO

To: YOU as CISO

Re: Risk Management and Management Responsibilities

In your recent presentation to my direct reports you discussed how the implementation of the Risk Management program will provide the tools that senior management needs to meet its obligations for due diligence and fiduciary duty. How exactly is this possible and what is needed by senior management to make this implementation successful?

Question 2:

From: Melanie Waterson, Chief Financial Officer

To: YOU as CISO

Re: Risk Assessment Success

As the Financial end of the business I am always concerned with the bottom line. I like it when things add up and can be examined using an established set of standards. Our financial reports can identify when the corporation has been successful. With that in mind, how do we know when a risk assessment has been successful?

Question 3:

From: Steven Johnson, Internal Audit Manager

To: YOU as CISO

Re: Risk Assessment Framework

I understand you plan to adopt the NIST Risk Management Framework and controls. From my understanding, NIST is geared toward government organizations and not businesses. I was hoping you could tell me why we may want to adopt the NIST RMF and controls over one of the other frameworks, such as ISO 270001, which seems to be more widely recognized. Do you plan to use NIST 800-53 or a smaller subset, such as 800-171 and what is your reasoning behind this? We already have a significant amount of time and money invested in the ISO standard. We were planning to purchase the latest ISO standard and begin reviewing it for our use, but I will hold off on that decision until we hear more from you.

Question 4:

From: Lisa C. Bryson, CEO

To: YOU as CISO

Re: Risk Assessment Results

I received a copy of the risk assessment report for one of our production systems. I noticed a number of vulnerabilities were identified as high impact. Specifically, the IR and PS control families had a number of findings. I had no idea some of these controls were not implemented. I am not comfortable accepting the risk of this system. What is being done to mitigate the risk? What is the timeframe for implementation? Do you need anything from me to help reduce these risks to a more acceptable level? Please get back to me with you plan and needs.[supanova_question]

I’ve attached all the instructions, links, sources, etc. Feel free to contact me with any questions. To keep it

I’ve attached all the instructions, links, sources, etc. Feel free to contact me with any questions. To keep it

Please follows directions. I have provided a start for each response to each question that must be incorporated into Essay

Please follows directions. I have provided a start for each response to each question that must be incorporated into Essay. Please follows directions. I have provided a start for each response to each question that must be incorporated into Essay.

Please follows directions. I have provided a start for each response to each question that must be incorporated into your writing.

Reflective Statement Instructions Context: Imagine that you are applying for a scholarship or summer internship, and a well-intentioned administrator might ask you to describe your research and writing skill set. Use the Reflective Statement to introduce yourself and to explain your skill set to a group of university administrators. In addition to presenting who you are as a writer, offer commentary on your writing—your strengths, your growth over the semester, your goals for future growth, and your newly heightened awareness about the ways writing functions and will continue to function in your professional life.
To help you think through the work you’ve done this semester I remind you of some categories you can discuss in your reflective statement. You may mix and match as this helps you create a worthy reflection – a real resonance of your own response to your writing that you would like to carry forward into future writing you perform both inside and outside the academy.
Engagement with the Writing Process: Reflect on the ways in which you have engaged with the writing process. Give some descriiption of the effort you have put into this course. For example, have you tried out new things?
An Inventory of My Writing: What did you think of yourself as a writer when you came into the class? What do you think of yourself as a writer now? You might want to look at what you wrote at the beginning of the semester and provide a brief summary and critique of a number of different writings completed this semester.
Writing as a Critical Practice: Discuss some of the authors we’ve read and explain how they have influenced your thinking on particular subjects as well as your own experiences with writing.
My Favorite Piece of Writing: Consider our class discussions about the complexity of writing and many of the overlooked conventions that shape critical writing beyond learning grammatical rules. Review one of your favorite essays written in any of your classes this semester. Reflect on why you like it so much and what it says about you as a writer.
Future Goals: What are your future writing goals? Where do you go next? What will you do with or how will you build on the skills you have developed? What do you think the administrators should know about you in this regard?
REQUIREMENTS: This assignment will be graded according to the ENGW 102 rubric. Your essay must be submitted as a Word document. Your statement must be two full pages. Be sure to include a developed thesis that forecasts your claims. Your writing should provide clear examples and evidence that elaborates on your claims. Be sure to make every effort to achieve good organization and coherence, to provide adequate analysis and supporting evidence, to use expository strategies to elucidate your opinions and/or explanations, and to demonstrate clear control of language. Keep your audience in mind as you select syntax – be true to your goal in this assignment but also find ways to be true to yourself.
Reflective Statement CHECKLIST – Review the rubric.
*This assignment will be processed by safeassign. If any portion of the essay is text copied from other sources, you will receive a 0. Copying sentences written by someone else and using a thesaurus to trade out words is a form of plagiarism.
ORGANIZATION/ARGUMENT • Is the title specific? • Is there a thesis statement? • Does the essay make effective connections across ideas, texts, and examples? • Does the essay have a clear line of reasoning? • Does the essay use a complex organizational structure? • Does each paragraph have a unified focus on one idea? • Is every paragraph internally organized?
COHERENCY/EVIDENCE and its ANALYSIS – Does the essay meet the required word count for the assignment? • Does every paragraph have a clear topic sentence? • Does each paragraph make and support a clear claim? • Is each claim supported with specific detail and analysis?
AUDIENCE and LANGUAGE – Does the essay speak to a specific intended audience?
STYLE • Do the sentence structures include variation? • Is the language precise and specific?
GRAMMAR and MECHANICS • Are there any patterns of grammar errors? • Are there any attention errors (e.g., typos, omitted words)?
OUR COURSE THEMES/UNITS for GOOD TROUBLE/NECESSARY WRITING

Include some of the following into:

Truth to Power: Speaking Up, Speaking Out, Getting in the Way
From Racial Equity Advocate to Racial Equity Broker ~ Bring your own chair to the table of conversation à ACTION
You Are Never Too Young to Make a Difference
Always Vote!
Persistence and Resilience

Rubic is attached. Paper should be two pages. This is original writing/reflection. Do it use other sources.

I have attached a few of my writings throughout the course for your viewing and understanding of my style and thoughts to include.[supanova_question]

a) Start with an introduction into the social/cultural/historical significance of the social

a) Start with an introduction into the social/cultural/historical significance of the social
phenomenon. Use of statistics here can be helpful to draw your reader in.

b) Then, summarize what previous studies say about your social phenomenon. You should
include a description of the studies’ methods, main findings, overall conclusion etc. What
do we learn about your social phenomenon from previous research?

c) Bring it all together in a concluding paragraph. How is your research question connected to what you discussed? Why should you do this research? Why is this important to study?

Research Question: How does the youth view the police?

*CITE IN-TEXT CITATIONS

Link for the following questions:

jpbsnet.com/journals/jpbs/Vol_3_No_2_December_2015/1.pdf[supanova_question]

Essays. Was there a clear thesis? Are the required elements discussed adequately?

Please follows directions. I have provided a start for each response to each question that must be incorporated into Essay Essays.

Was there a clear thesis?

Are the required elements discussed adequately? Has a mastery of the material been demonstrated? (This is where most points are lost.)

Was material beyond the scope of the question presented? Was it relevant?

Was the essay organized logically? (-10% for unstructured blobs)

Common problems with students’ responses include:

Vague generalizations and personal opinions unsupported by details from the learning material

Use of outside sources to (mis)define key concepts

Important elements are omitted

The cure is simple enough; read the question carefully to be sure of what the instructor is looking for. Then prove how much you have learned.

Careful… Logical Essay Ahead

Although we tend to take communication for granted as easy and natural, many struggle with tasks that require effective writing. This is often the case when college students write essays in their social science courses. Their instructors are expecting facts and opinions to be presented in a particular fashion that they may not be comfortable or familiar with. Rather than panicking or taking their lumps, students can follow some basic rules that will give their essays the shape expected by the instructor. By writing logically and with care, students can best communicate their knowledge to their instructors and thereby maximize their grades.

Social scientists realize that debate over different views and theories rather than some agreed upon corpus of concepts, facts or laws best characterizes their areas of study. The topics studied are subject to various interpretations. Social scientists thus expect their students to recognize the disputed character of their subjects and to form and express opinions on them. Thus, essay assignments generally require responses that elaborate theses or defend arguments. Appropriate responses make general statements that are supported with logic and descriptive examples.

Offering a logically and carefully written response begins before any writing takes place. Students are often tempted to offer a quick response to an invitation to argue, which can lead to many mistakes. First of all, the student needs to be certain of exactly what the question is asking; misunderstanding what is sought by a question is one of the surest ways to fail to answer it properly. Gaps in a student’s essay may occur when necessary elements to the reply were overlooked in haste. A moment of careful reflection on the meaning of the question pays many dividends. Second, a rush to reply may be spurred by the desire to offer a rash response. Making an argument in an essay does not amount to shouting on paper. A logical response employs reason and facts to support an opinion and does not confuse these elements. It also deals with other points of view in an intelligent way (i.e. unlike talk radio hosts). Rather than being quick on the draw, students benefit most by taking the time to consider the question and the possible responses to it before framing their reply.

Solid arguments are carefully crafted; they present information in a logically structured manner. After considering the response to offer, students next need to write outlines of their essays that arrange the necessary elements in their arguments. Every essay ought to have three basic parts: introduction, main body and conclusion. The introduction serves as a place for setting context and clearly stating the thesis. The importance of the issue can also be described briefly. The greatest sin is to surprise the reader in the conclusion by finally revealing the thesis: social scientists prefer to read mysteries in their spare time. The conclusion restates the argument of the essay, introducing no new information except for simple bits of information that support the overall argument. This means that the real work of the essay is done in the main body, which should be organized into distinct paragraphs that are dependent upon each other logically. To the chagrin of many (but not all), there is no generic formula that one may apply to all essays since this structure will depend heavily on the question and the author’s knowledge and point of view. The key points in an argument should occur to the author during that period of reflection that precedes writing. Their logical relations to one another should determine their order of occurrence: it is best to begin with generalities and definitions before bringing up details, for instance.

Writing with care means avoiding gaps (mentioned above) and gaffes. While gaps in an argument are like holes in a ship’s hull, gaffes can be compared to bad mistakes in arranging the sails. Mistaken assertions of fact (getting it wrong) are the most damaging to an argument, although improper grammar and misspellings hurt too. One common misstep by students that produces gaffes is a tendency to talk on paper. It is important to use standard written English in order to communicate effectively to particular audiences such as political scientists. Slang and other improper forms of English that occur rarely and when appropriate can contribute to an essay’s effectiveness, but, like the distinction between opinion and facts, street language and exclamation points need to be distinguished from the type of English needed to succeed. Rereading an essay after it has been written can lead to the discovery of many gaffes that can be fixed before the instructor sees the response. Objectivity is the best means of insuring a critical eye is employed in editing: if a student cannot get someone else to do the reading, she or he can set the essay aside for some time before returning to it.

Effective essay writing is an acquired skill. Some may be better adept than others due to their personal characteristics, but all can follow similar guidelines that yield better answers than might otherwise result. Writing logically and carefully requires forethought, structure and attention to facts and conventions of writing. When put together in the right mixture, these elements permit students to present arguments that convince readers — a valuable and practical skill both inside and outside of the confines of college.

Outline

Intro: Care and logic produce effective essay writing

1. The need to argue

2. Initial response: think

problems: misreading, gaps, shouting

3. Structure through an outline

intro and concl

main body: question dependent

4. Care: gaffes

facts

English

Concl: Success and essay writing elements

Maxims of essay writing.

For those who are scientifically inclined and text-averse. Note that you would do well to read the essay provided since it offers an example of what it is describing.

Writing effectively requires employing care and logic

Do not rush into a rash response to an essay question

Make a clear argument in the introduction

Use logic to structure the sequential presentation of material and content

The number and order of paragraphs supporting the argument will depend on the topic and author

Avoid mistakes in facts and use of English

Success in essay writing can lead to other successes

i[supanova_question]

PHILOSOPHY ESSAY Write a 6 – 7-page essay (1500-2000 words). You must

PHILOSOPHY ESSAY

Write a 6 – 7-page essay (1500-2000 words). You must write on one of the topics listed below. It may be possible to modify one of these questions, but you must first get my permission. Essays on unapproved topics will receive a ‘0.’ The essay must be typed, double-spaced, and paginated (i.e., pages should be numbered). Indicate which question you are addressing on your title page. Papers will be evaluated on the basis of a demonstrated understanding of the material, organization, critical thought, originality, and clarity. As a general rule, you should include two brief citations per page (this is not a rigid rule, you may, for example, have one citation on one page, but three on another page). When quoting or paraphrasing an author, try to choose passages that were not discussed in class. All references must be properly cited, including page numbers. Your paper should include a “Works Cited” page (i.e., bibliography). You should also have a title page. If you have any questions about this assignment, please feel free to speak to me during my office hours (see how to do that on your course syllabus).

Research

The topic below has specific texts that you are required to use for this assignment. While you’re certainly welcome to do more research if you wish, you are not required to do so. If you would like to do more research, the following are good starting points:

• Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

• Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Citing Sources

Use one of the standard citation formats for the Humanities. Two common ones for

philosophy are Chicago and MLA. This website offers a very useful guide for using these

two styles. You can also use Turabian (which is a simplified version of Chicago). I prefer

Chicago or Turabian: both are straightforward. If you want to see a sample paper (using

Chicago style) with some guidance about how to structure an essay, look carefully at this

document; see in particular, how endnotes are handled at the end of the document. It’s

very helpful. The sample paper is for a history course, but the same formatting applies for

philosophy papers as well. I highly recommend that you consult this sample paper. Avoid

using citation styles that are commonly used in the social sciences (e.g., APA) — as these

often do not require the author to cite page numbers. It’s critical that you cite page

numbers for your quotes/references. You need a Bibliography (Works Cited page) at

the end of your paper. “Marino” refers to the textbook that we are using for this

course.

TOPIC

Note: For the question below, feel free to either agree or disagree with the author in question.

But, make sure you have shown the reader that you understand your chosen existentialist author. All texts mentioned within the essay topics below are required reading.

ESSAY QUESTION:

What is despair for Kierkegaard? Why does he think it’s more widespread (possibly even

“universal”) than we commonly believe? What does he mean when he asserts that “[t]o become oneself is to become concrete.” How can we overcome existential despair? For this topic, your focus will be the selection from Sickness unto Death. Use Sylvia Walsh’s commentary to help you make sense of Kierkegaard’s claim. Resist the temptation to repeat what her commentary says. Strive to put these ideas into your own words. Cite the relevant passages from Sickness unto Death and Walsh’s Kierkegaard: Thinking Christianly in an Existential Mode [see in particular her discussion that begins on p. 96. This text is available as an online ebook.][supanova_question]

Example Contrast Outline (5%) Task: Fill in this outline with information (point

Example Contrast Outline (5%)

Task: Fill in this outline with information (point form/bullets or full sentence) about the topic you’ve chosen for the contrast essay assignment.

This is an example outline only

This outline is organized in the point-by-point format

TOPIC: English vs. Farsi

INTRODUCTION

Start with an interesting hook (tell a personal story, provide statistical information on the topic, or provide a quotation)

English is a complex language with many rules and exceptions which can cause confusion and frustration.

Provide Background information/general information; assume that the reader IS NOT FAMILIAR with the topic of your essay

There are rules about verb tense, sentence structure, etc.

Students who speak Farsi who want to learn English struggle learning it

Thesis Statement (state your topic, your 2 items/topics, and your

3 points of contrast)

*thesis statement needs to be in parallel structure

Write a full sentence

ESL students who speak Farsi as their first language have more difficulty in learning English than other learners due to distinct differences in sentence structure, pronunciation and rhetorical mode.

BODY PARAGRAPH 1 (Criteria #1)

Criteria #1

Sentence structure

Topic A: English

Details basic sentence structure: SVO

Details helping verbs: have, be, do

Details question word order: question words start questions

Topic B: Farsi

Details basic sentence structure: SOV

Details question intonation

Details question words can go anywhere in sentence (Mace, 2003)

BODY PARAGRAPH 2 (Criteria #2)

Criteria #2

Pronunciation

Topic A: English

Details emphasize certain key words

Details words can start with consonant and vowel sound (Avery & Enrlich, 2008)

Topic B: Farsi

Details emphasize verbs

Details words often start with vowel sound (Windfuhr, 2009)

BODY PARAGRAPH 3 (Criteria #3)

Criteria #3

Rhetorical mode

Topic A: English

Writes arguments are specific, mechanical and structured

Details linear writing

Topic B: Farsi

Details free flowing, lots of digression, no structure

Details circular writing

CONCLUSION

Restate your thesis statement (state your topic, your 2 items/topics, and your 3 points of contrast)

Write a full sentence

If a Farsi speaker can master the intricacies of English sentence structure, pronunciation and rhetorical mode, learning the English language will be problem-free and maybe even fun.

*NOTE: my thesis statement in my introductory paragraph and my restated thesis statement in my concluding paragraph state the same information but in different structure.

Summarize the main points discussed in the essay

English and Farsi are different in basic sentence structure and how to form questions

Pronunciation – English emphasizes key words while Farsi emphasizes verbs

English writes linearly and Farsi writes circularly.

Final thought (your personal preference, advise, etc.)

Learning the difference between your first language and English helps in understanding the similarities and differences between languages.

References

Avery, P & Enrlich, S. (2008). Teaching American English Pronunciation. Oxford University Press.

Mace, J. (2003). Persian Grammar for Reference and Revision 1st Ed. Routledge.

Windfuhr, G. (2009). The Iranian Languages. Routledge.[supanova_question]

Extra credit: post-semester assessment Your name _________________________________________ Your major _________________________________________ RC1 Name

Extra credit: post-semester assessment

Your name _________________________________________

Your major _________________________________________

RC1

Name four of the principles of any professional engineering code of ethics (indicate which code you are referencing).

Name four reasons it is important for professional engineers to have and follow a code of ethics in their practice.

RC2

What is your major? Now, name an engineering professional society. Indicate whether this society is one in which you are: (a) an active member, (b) not an active member currently, but you intend to become one or have tried to be one, (c) not an active member, but you know that this society would be appropriate for someone with your major to join, or (d) not a member and this society is not relevant to your major.

Name four reasons it is important or beneficial for professional engineers to have societies and be active in them.

RC3

What is a Risk Cost Benefit Analysis? What does it measure?

What is the difference between (a) safety factor (also known as Realized Factor of Safety) and (b) design factor (also known as Required Factor of Safety)? How is each one determined? Which should be greater?

RC4

Name four ethical considerations for an engineering project.

Name four ways ethical issues in engineering projects can be addressed or resolved.

RC5

Describe in detail an example/case study in which a culture of safety had to be cultivated in order to address problems caused by a previous lack of concern for safety.

Name four factors/conditions that either promote or discourage a culture of safety in a professional environment.

RC6

What is a “stakeholder?” Why is it important to consider them when designing a product for market?

Name four duties an ethical professional engineer has to her or his client.

RC7

What is the “Precautionary Principle?” What arguments are there in favor of using it for environmental and social impact of technology? What are some criticisms of it?

Name a particular technological artifact and identify four values that are embedded in the technology.[supanova_question]

Created Fall 2018 Prepared by: Ali Soleymani and Taral Patel; Adapted by

Created Fall 2018

Prepared by: Ali Soleymani and Taral Patel; Adapted by Evelyn Glube

Formal Report (Part C) Instructions

Due Date: Week 12

Length: 3000 words (excludes References and Appendices)

OVERVIEW

Writing a formal report is the important, final step of completing a major project. The report needs to follow the Technology Report Guideline of Ontario Association of Certified Engineering Technicians and Technologists (OACETT, 2017). The purpose of the Technology Report is to demonstrate the candidate’s technical problem solving abilities; specifically, students must demonstrate their abilities to:

Identify and define a technical problem

Describe the problem accurately and in detail

Logically apply a technical methodology to attempt to solve the problem

Describe the results through the use of technology fundamentals, designs, data analysis and other appropriate techniques

Draw conclusions about the results

Make recommendations, if applicable

The final report must demonstrate a level of engineering technology or applied science knowledge and application equal to that required of an Engineering Technologist. The candidate must also demonstrate the ability to present information and ideas in an integrated, cohesive document.

The Technology Report will be evaluated in three areas:

A. Report Structure

B. Content Quality

C. Format

REPORT STRUCTURE

The Technology Report must communicate information in a standard, comprehensible way following acceptable structure, style, and format. The following components should be included in the Technology Report:

1. Title Page

The title should be descriptive of the work completed, but also concise (typically less than 10 words). In some cases, the technical report may include an appropriate title for the project. The title page should also include the date, the names of the team members who contributed to the report (if applicable), the class/project section, student identification number and the name of the Professor to whom the report is being submitted.

2. Declaration of Authorship

The candidate must clearly indicate which parts of the overall Technology Report he or she completed and which were completed by other members of the group, the college and program name for which the report was completed and the date of submission to the college. The Declaration of Sole Authorship, worded as follows:

I, ___________________________ confirm that this breakdown of authorship

represents my contribution to the work submitted for assessment and my

contribution is my own work and is expressed in my own words. Any uses made

within the Technology Report of the works of any other author, separate to the work

group, in any form (ideas, equations, figures, texts, tables, programs), are properly

acknowledged at the point of use. A list of the references used is included.

All sources of information must be acknowledged in the Technology Report. Plagiarism is unethical and will result in a grade of zero. Suspected cases of plagiarism will be addressed as described in the Centennial College Academic Honesty and Plagiarism policy.

3. Abstract (or Executive Summary)

The abstract should provide a synopsis (approximately 75 to 100 words ) of what is contained in the report. This should include a description of the project design (why and how), the data presented, and the main conclusions drawn from the data. When you write a technical report or paper, the abstract is an invaluable tool to those who might subsequently be interested in its contents (i.e. professors, instructors, managers, senior vice-presidents, colleagues, etc.). The abstract allows someone to quickly assess whether or not it is critical to read your entire report, (i.e. is it important that they read the report, and if so, should they read it immediately?).

4. Table of Contents

5. List of Illustrations

6. Introduction

The introduction should explain the importance and objectives of the design, and provide a rationale for the method used. For a design project, explain (in introductory terms) the intended application and the engineering principles applied to the design. For experiments, explain (in introductory terms) the physical or other principles that the experiment will illuminate or demonstrate. Follow this with a simple description of the experiment chosen (or assigned in most cases). The introduction should also place the design in context. You can provide this context by researching secondary sources on related theories and/or engineering principles, and paraphrasing the information in your own words with citations. You can provide further context by briefly describing any experimental methods that others have used to illuminate or test the same physical principles.

7. Design Section (if applicable)

Some projects have a significant design component. For example, a design lab might ask you to design and build a circuit to perform analog to digital conversion on an audio signal. For these types of design projects, a separate section can be used to outline the design methodology. This includes a description of the design constraints and the goals of the design. What are the inputs you have to work with (input signals, equipment, resources, etc.)? What are the desired outputs (output signals, tasks the design should perform, etc.)? Make sure to both describe and justify the chosen design.

8. Results/Data/Analysis

The results section is a record of key observations. Depending on the design, it may be appropriate to present results as pictures, graphical data, tabular data, and/or written description. Each graph, figure, or table should be described in detail and complete sentences. The data presented must be so that your purpose for including the data is clear. If a lot of raw data is generated in a design (i.e., a table or graph that exceeds one page) it is better placed as an appendix.

9. Conclusion(s)

In the conclusion, concisely summarize what you learned as a result of conducting the design. This can include both expected and unexpected observations and conclusions about the design method itself (e.g. “we concluded that the chosen design method cannot provide a reliable estimate of the speed of sound in water, because….”). You can also use this section to briefly describe suggestions for future work, including ideas for improving the design.

10. Recommendation(s)

In the recommendations, suggest a course of action to the reader. This may include revisions to a design, alternative steps/process for an experiment, or additional areas for others to study.

11. References

List any literature sources (books, papers, articles, websites, etc.) that you used in researching your topic and writing the report.

12. Appendices

Reserve appendices for anything that distracts from the straightforward reading of the report. Examples of appendices include a long list of raw numerical data; long and involved theoretical calculations with numerous formulae; and collections of images captured from scientific instruments. Each appendix should be referred to within the main body of the technical report. Often, the data from the appendix is summarized in some fashion in the results section. This might involve some manipulation of the data, or it might simply be a case of choosing sample data from large collection of data contained in an appendix.

REPORT FORMAT

The formal report must demonstrate appropriate format and effective style. The list below briefly describes the expectations for format and style. Specific expectations are listed on the rubric.

The report should be typed, double-spaced using Arial, Univers, or a similar Sans Serif 12-point font

The lines should be justified left, with pages number and appropriate page breaks

Correct spelling, punctuation, and grammar must be used

Consistent voice, subject-verb agreement, and verb tenses must be used

Jargon should be avoided

Acronyms must be explained

References, citations and paraphrasing must be accurate, and follow APA conventions[supanova_question]

2 1 Design of Fall Detection Service for seniors Juan Carlos Apache

2

1

Design of Fall Detection Service for seniors

Juan Carlos Apache Ayala

Centennial College

Report Writing – ENG 250 SEC 010

Sunjida khan

October 21, 2021

Design of Fall Detection Service for seniors

To: Sunjida Khan

From: Juan Carlos Apache Ayala, 301160358, Engl 250-SEC010

Date: October 13, 2021

Re: Proposal to research the design of fall detection service for seniors

As a student in the Electro-Mechanical Engineering Technician: Biomedical Engineering Technology, I have chosen this topic of design of fall detection service for seniors This subject is not only important to the elderly, but also to the entire population, who will one day reach the old age or acquire the senior status.

The topics that were considered for the formal report related to the biomedical engineering and technology program and they include the following:

Applications of methods of prosthetic control

Design of fall detection service for seniors

The topic that was chosen was design of fall detection service for seniors. The decision was based on different reasons shown below:

Different health conditions contribute to the increase of falls among seniors. An example is chronic conditions

Senior falls can lead to worse outcomes such fractured bones, traumatic brain injury, and broken hip

Seniors need to get urgent medical attention when they fall

Proposal Details:

Proposed Plan:

The research process will begin with a literature search. The main source of literature search will be the Centennial College Library Catalogue. Information will be retrieved from different sources including physical books available in the library, e-books, online articles, journals, technology websites, company websites, and other relevant sources. On the internet, research will mainly be conducted on Google Scholar and other relevant databases to ensure credibility.

The topic sections for the formal report could contain the following:

Analyzing the health challenges that increase the chances of falling among seniors

Analyzing the consequences of falls among the senior population

Comparing the fall detection services that are available right now. This will involve determining their prices, flexibility, accessibility, and also comparing the advantages and disadvantages

Determining how the new service will help in preventing falls

Determining the factors to be considered in developing the new service

Feasibility:

Why is this topic important in my field? The main reason why this subject was chosen is to solve a problem that is impacting the quality of life for the senior population. It is a solution that can be beneficial to everyone as we will all get old at some point. The current large population of the elderly will highly benefit from this solution. Apart from this, the topic will provide business opportunities, while the improving the quality of life for everyone at the same time. Some of the limitations of topic include the fact that it may be too broad.

I believe that this is a very good topic for my formal report, and as such, I request your approval so that I can begin as soon as possible. You can contact me at 647-9298124 or email met at ajuancar@my.centennialcollege.ca. I will also ensure that I am in contact with you through email, if you fail to respond on time for one reason or another. Thank you and I hope to hear from you soon.[supanova_question]

The final assignment for Toxicology is to integrate the information in your

The final assignment for Toxicology is to integrate the information in your choice of 10 bullet point presentations by your fellow class members, plus your own. You may choose the 10 presentations according to your interest; grouping the presentations by broad subject may aid in your organization of the issues. You will not use any material for this assignment other than the 10 bullet point presentations and your own. For example:

You may choose presentations of articles similar in topic to yours (e.g., effects on different natural populations), then discuss issues and progress in that area of the science

You may choose articles of a wide variety of topics, then discuss the general state of the science

You may choose articles with results that are very different from the paper you reviewed, then contrast the ideas presented

This assignment is to write generally about what you have learned about neonicotinoid pesticide toxicology from your peers, focusing on your presentation and the 10 bullet point presentations you
selected. You may liken this assignment to how you would explain what you have learned about neonicotinoid pesticide toxicology to another person who was not familiar with neonicotinoids. Here is a good example paper from 2019 when our topic was microplastics:
Example Final Summary Paper.pdf. (Please note that I have omitted the reference section in this example.)

You should list the reference information from the 11 articles at the end of your paper (in alphabetical order by article first author’s last name), but do not cite them within the paper. The reason citing the actual articles is not appropriate for this paper is because you are using only your peers’ presentations as your sources. Here’s an example of how to list the 11 references:

• Doe, J and JB Doette. 2021. Everything we know about neonicotinoids from our research. J. Toxicology 21:56-60. (Reviewed by [classmate’s name]) I WILL DO THIS PART – PLEASE JUST DO THE REFRENCES

Paper length: 3-5 (maximum 5) pages, double-spaced, 12-point font (you must be succinct!).[supanova_question]

2 TAKE-HOME FINAL History 175A—Fall 2021 Write a 6-7 page analytical essay

2

TAKE-HOME FINAL

History 175A—Fall 2021

Write a 6-7 page analytical essay on one of the following four prompts:

“Popular culture and mass leisure are liberating realms that allow consumers and performers to try on new identities, test new freedoms, and cross social and cultural boundaries.” Assess the validity of this statement with regard to:

Movies (discuss two of the silent films screened in class and two of the following readings: Peiss, chapter 6; Friedman article; Enstad article; any of the short essays on Birth of a Nation)

and two of the following:

Native American performers in Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show (Kasson, ch. 5)

Amusement parks (Peiss, chapter 5; Coney Island: A Documentary Film)

Blackface performance in vaudeville (Kibler article)

Jim Jeffries-Jack Johnson prizefight (Roberts article)

Department stores (Abelson, Leach articles)

Helpful hint: Be sure to consider how popular culture could both disrupt and reinforce social hierarchies based on race, gender, and class.

To what extent did mass commercial amusements and new institutions of leisure (such as department stores and saloons) erode Victorian codes of respectability, gender, and sexual morality, and the older middle-class culture of self-control? How did the varied agendas of reformers, show business entrepreneurs, performers, retailers, and consumers help to foster and/or control such transformations in American culture? In your answer, discuss:

Movies (discuss two of the silent films screened in class and two of the following readings: Peiss, chapter 6; Friedman article; Enstad article; any of the short essays on Birth of a Nation)

and two of the following:

Amusement parks (Peiss, chapter 5; Coney Island: A Documentary Film)

Blackface performance in vaudeville (Kibler article)

Jim Jeffries-Jack Johnson prizefight (Roberts article)

Department stores (Abelson, Leach articles)

Saloons (Parsons article)

During the late nineteenth and early twentieth century, cultural commentators began to talk about the rise of the “New Woman” and the “New Negro”—two boundary-testing figures who defied Victorian social norms and confidently asserted their independence from constraining expectations of feminine respectability and racial respectability. How did filmmakers, the media, and consumer spectators validate or even celebrate these two new cultural figures? How and why did they seek to contain the threat posed by the New Woman and the New Negro? What similarities and difference do you see in the public and political responses to these two figures? In your answer discuss three of the following:

Working-girl serials (use Enstad article)

Anti-suffrage films (A Lively Affair) and anti-vice films such as Traffic in Souls and Inside the White Slave Traffic (use Friedman article)

The Birth of a Nation (use various short essays on Birth of a Nation, Davarian Baldwin’s essay is especially helpful for this question; discuss key scenes from)

Jim Jeffries-Jack Johnson prizefight (Roberts article)

Popular culture after the Civil War represented Black Americans and Native Americans alternately as heroes and villains, as threatening figures and nonthreatening figures (the vanishing Indian, the dying Black Union soldier, the loyal servant), and as objects of sympathy and derision. Black Americans and Native Americans also figured prominently in (or were exiled from) popular narratives that defined the nation’s “greatness” and illuminated its unfulfilled promises. Analyze these varied representations of race, focusing in particular on how popular culture used such representations to redefine American national identity and promote national reconciliation after the Civil War. In formulating your thesis, consider the political and cultural consequences of such representations. In your answer, discuss:

Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show and other popular representations of the West (Kasson)

and two of the following:

Popular culture during the Civil War (Fahs article)

Popular memory of the Civil War and Reconstruction (Blight article, various essays on The Birth of a Nation, scenes from The Birth of a Nation)

Jim Jeffries-Jack Johnson prizefight (Roberts article)

Blackface performance in vaudeville (Kibler article)

World’s Fairs (use relevant documents)

Explain why these representations of race resonated with some Americans and outraged others and how the production and reception of these texts was shaped by the times in which they were created and identities of their audiences.

List of films and documentary discussed and screened in class.

Unless otherwise noted, the films below can be accessed on GauchoCast, located on the right-hand side of the GauchoSpace course page. I will provide time markers for key scenes in a separate document.

The Birth of a Nation (1915)

A Lively Affair (1912) (linked to in Lecture 18 PowerPoint)

Traffic in Souls (1913) (linked to in Lecture 18 PowerPoint)

The Inside of the White Slave Traffic (1913) (linked to in Lecture 18 PowerPoint)

Coney Island: A Documentary (PBS, The American Experience, 1991)

Savage Acts: Wars, Fairs, and Empire, 1898-1904 (American Social History Productions, 1995)

Unforgiveable Blackness: The Rise and Fall of Jack Johnson (PBS Home Video, 2005)

Due Date, Late Papers, and Extensions:

Papers are due Wednesday, December 8 by 5:00PM. I will grant a one-day extension to students who request one in advance of the formal due date. Longer extensions will be decided on a case by case basis. Late papers will be marked down 3 points for each day late (an A- would become a B+) and will not be accepted after Friday, December 10 without a formal extension from the professor.

Formatting and Citations

Papers should be 6-7 double-spaced, typed pages with one-inch margins and 12-point type.

Please upload a PDF to GauchoSpace. Save the PDF using the following label: Last Name, First Name, Prompt number.

Please number the pages on your paper.

Citations must identify the author and page number. Any citation format you choose to use is acceptable, as long as you are consistent in the style you adopt. I will not count endnotes or the Works Cited page toward the page limit. To make sure that I give students full credit for using lectures (and in recognition of the fact that the lectures and readings sometimes overlap), please cite lecture. You can do this either in a footnote or in a parenthetical notation at the end of the sentence, like so: (Lecture 4, 10/5/21). As a matter of personal preference, I would rather students not put quotation marks around material from lecture; do your best to paraphrase the lectures.

I do not expect students to use materials beyond those assigned for this class. Please consult with me first if you wish to do so.

Grading Criteria:

Papers will be graded on content (how well do you make use of the assigned readings and lectures? how well do you support your arguments? how persuasive is your analysis? how well do you explain the historical context in which popular culture was created and consumed?), form (paragraph organization, clarity of prose, coherence, development of ideas), and mechanics (spelling, grammar, and punctuation).

The essay questions highlight important readings that I expect students to use, but it is also important to incorporate material from lecture.

Office Hours:

I will be available to answer questions and read over outlines and thesis statements during my regular office hours and my extended Zoom office hours on Monday, December 6, from 10:30-12:30PM. If you would like to see me on December 6, please add your name to the sign-up sheet located in the top block of GauchoSpace and use this link to connect via Zoom: https://ucsb.zoom.us/j/81094883071?pwd=S2tvMWVBSk1LU0RJcXU1bjR2Vmt3Zz09.
I will also regularly check my email to answer questions and review thesis statements, introductions, and outlines of up to two pages.[supanova_question]

1 Why Title IX is Unfair? GEB3033 Parker King Title IX of

1

Why Title IX is Unfair?

GEB3033

Parker King

Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 prohibits sex discrimination in any education program or activity receiving federal financial assistance. Title IX was originally put in place to provide equal opportunities for males and females. It was also meant to create opportunities for young athletes. However, over the past 40 years Title IX has eliminated many men’s programs and opportunities for men because schools must comply to Title IX.

The first way Title IX is unfair to men’s organizations is because men’s teams are proven to have more attraction and popularity, but scholarships are being taken away from men and given to women to abide by Title IX. This is especially prevalent with schools with football programs. Schools now must give equal amounts of scholarships to men and women. Since there are no women football teams, men playing sports that have women teams or versions are getting less scholarships. Title IX “instantly creates male queues and female shortages,” according to Epstein. (35) This means that there are more men trying to find an opportunity in sports then there are females able to fill spots. This is obviously leaving many male athletes with nowhere to play their sport. Since Title IX was enacted around 400 men’s sports teams have fallen apart.

The culture around sports has also changed a lot since Title IX was put into place. The way sports are integrated into our everyday lives now is not what it used to be like in the 70s. In 2007-08 academic year the NCAA division 1 men’s program had 22.2 million dollars in revenue, while the women’s average was 865,00 dollars. Watson (2012

) Title IX allows for equal number of teams, so schools are missing out millions of dollars in revenue from their sports programs. The men’s players that are also cut out from playing because of the lack of scholarships available are also losing out on the chance to make money as a collegiate athlete. Many coaches have had to cut men’s teams because they claim Title IX is unfair and outdated.

Title IX was never created to hurt men’s sports team when it was passed in 1972. Since then, the world of sports has changed, and Title IX needs to be updated or abolished to accommodate this change in sports. Women still deserve the right to play team sports, but men’s teams do not deserve to get penalized just for women to play. There are much more men, especially at the collegiate level, that play sports simply because there are more men sports teams than women sports team. The number of scholarships given out should be equal per gender for this reason. Even with Title IX the money at many schools is still not allocated properly. At the average public university women make of 53% of the student population, but they receive 40% of the overall funding for education and athletics. Gaille (2017)

The smaller Olympic men’s sports such as wrestling, swimming, and track and field have experienced the effects of Title IX the worst. These sports don’t get as much attention as sports such as football, baseball, and basketball. Since they are not as popular, they often get stripped away of their scholarships and funding goes through the floor to give more scholarships to the bigger sports. An appropriate solution for this problem could be to give equal scholarships to men and women if there is both a men’s team and women’s team or version of the same sport, then and only then should there be equal scholarships given out.

Overall, the Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 was originally passed for good reasons and to allow women to have equal rights when it comes to competing in sports. But since 1972 the role of women sports has changed drastically, and the Title needs to be amended to still be relevant, but not harm men’s sports teams. Title IX is now unfair to a lot of men who play sports that are not as popular because the teams are losing funding or getting cut out completely. Title IX was originally meant to be good but is now starting to hurt sports teams because of how the sports world has evolved.

Work Cited

Coakley, J. J. (2021). Sports in society: Issues and controversies. McGraw-Hill.

Index to Journal of Sport and Social Issues. (2006). Journal of Sport and Social Issues, 30(4), 395–397. https://doi.org/10.1177/019372350603000408

Rittner, V. (1976). Sociology, history and sport. International Review of Sport Sociology, 11(3), 85–101. https://doi.org/10.1177/101269027601100306

Title IX: The good, the bad, the ugly. Composition. (n.d.). Retrieved October 25, 2021, from https://composition.colostate.edu/courses/conversationscontexts/talkingbackarchive/tbv2-2/title-ix-the-good-the-bad-the-ugly/.

Gaille, L. (2019, December 16). 16 pros and cons of title IX. Vittana.org. Retrieved October 25, 2021, from https://vittana.org/16-pros-and-cons-of-title-ix.[supanova_question]

Gender and Social Change final information Textbook: Alibris: Women in Culture: An

Gender and Social Change final information

Textbook:

Alibris: Women in Culture: An Intersectional Anthology for Gender and Women’s Studies (vitalsource.com)

Username: pbafia@twu.edu

Password: Cade1998!!

This is also my loggin to the twu canvas if needed ^

This is the textbook you will need for the final, find a concept from each chapter to relate to a song lyric etc…

21FAWS201353 GENDER & SOCIAL CHANGE (panopto.com)

21FAWS201353 GENDER & SOCIAL CHANGE (panopto.com)

These two videos of my teacher talking are very important and helpful and give good instructions and examples of the final project[supanova_question]

HSC Assessment Task Notification HSIE – Legal Studies HSC Assessment Task Notification

HSC Assessment

Task Notification

HSIE – Legal Studies

HSC Assessment

Task Notification

HSIE – Legal Studies

Course: HSC Legal Studies Student: ____________________________________________

Teachers: Mrs. De Jesus/Mrs Page Head Teacher: Mrs. Akrong

Task Number: 1 Task Name: Crime Research Report (Core Topic Part 1)

Date Issues: Week 5, 5/11/2021 Due Date: 08:30am Monday 13th December 2021 (T4, Week11)

Weighing: 25% Total Marks: 30

Syllabus Outcomes:

H4 Evaluate the effectiveness of the legal system in addressing issues

H5 Explains the role of law in encouraging cooperation and resolving conflict, as well as initiating and responding to change

H6 Assess the nature of the interrelationship between the legal system and society

H8 Locates, selects, organizes, synthesizes and analyses legal information from a variety of sources including legislation, cases, media, international instruments and documents

H9 Communicates legal information using well-structured and logical arguments.

Task Summary:

You are required to research and write a report followed by an extended response on an indictable criminal case that has been prosecuted in the past 10 years in either a District Court or Supreme Court in the NSW Criminal Justice System where the defendant has been found guilty.

PART A (15 marks)

Your report must address the following components:

Identify the correct legal citation of the case – case name

Outline the elements of the offence – Causation and actus raius

Describe the factors that may have led to the criminal behaviour – substance abuse issues, childhood trauma, phycological factor, childhood, friends

Outline the reporting and investigation of the crime – 2 separate paragraphs

Who reported it?

How did they report it?

When did they report it?

Factors contributed in the investigation of the crime

Explain the role of the courts (including the juries) and legal representation in the criminal trial process.

Burden of proof

Criminal defence

Explain the various factors that have affected the sentencing decision

Factors effecting

Aggravating factors – presence of weapon, abuse of position of power

Mitigating factors – reduce the sentence of the crime: first crime, history of abuse

Word Limit for Part A: 1300 – 1500

PART B (15 Marks)

Once you have completed Part A of this task, you are required to write an extended response to the following essay question. You should make a detailed reference to your chosen case as well as other relevant LCMIDs for detailed analysis of the question.

‘Evaluate the effectiveness of the law in balancing the rights of victims, offenders and society in the Criminal Justice System’

Rights of victim

How the law is balancing

In manslaughter or murder cases, there is no aspect of justice that will bring that the victim back to life, so we can have each victim’s impact statements. We can put the offender in prison for a long period of time, but no factor that the court takes that can protect that person from violence or save their Life, so in terms of your judgement. the law reacted in that night out it waits for a crime to be committed before it can be punished. The right to Presumption of innocence or innocent until proven guilty. The right to legal representation. The right to an appeal.

Word Limit for Part B: 900 – 1000 words

PART C

Include a bibliography (APA referencing) of at six (or more) sources including Legislations, Cases, Media, International Documents

Total word Limit for this task is 2500- 2750 words. Students who exceed this limit by 10% will have a 10% penalty applied to their mark.

Submission Information:

All reports must be typed using Calibri Font, Size 12, 1.5 spacing and include your Full name and NESA number.

An electronic copy of your report must be submitted via CANVAS by 8.30am by the due date AND;

A Hard Copy of your report, along with this completed sheet, must also be submitted to your classroom teacher by 8.30am on the due date.

Additional Information:

Please carefully read and follow the Task Description and Marking Criteria attached.

Read the HSC Assessment Handbook for further information about assessment rules and procedures.

On submission of the hand-in(Hard Copy) assessment task, the student must:

a) Detach this cover sheet from the Assessment Task Notification and submit it with their assessment task at the time of submission

b) Complete the Student Receipt below with the correct information

Ensure that both they and the teacher sign the Student Receipt

Ensure that the teacher detaches the Student Receipt from the cover page and returns it to the student

Retain the Student Receipt as evidence of the submission of their work

—————————————————————————————————————————————————-

Student Receipt of hand-in Assessment Task Submission:

I have submitted the task, (task name) on / / (date).

The work I have submitted is all my own work and includes correct acknowledgement and reference to the work of others used to create this task. I have read and accept the rules and procedures detailed in the school’s Preliminary Assessment Handbook.

Student Name:

Student Signature:

I acknowledge that I have received the abovementioned task from this student on the date stated.

Teacher Name: Teacher Signature: _________________________________

Assessment Marking Criteria

PART A

You will be assessed on your ability to:

Clearly report on every aspect of the case as specified in the task description

Present a sustained, logical and cohesive response in your research report which is well-structured and the use of appropriate heading and sub-headings

Integrate relevant legal concepts and terminology

Refer to relevant examples such as legislations, cases, media, international instruments and documents

Locate, select, organise, synthesise and analyse legal information from a variety of sources, and provide a referenced bibliography of at least six sources.

Criteria

Mark Range

Grade

Demonstrates extensive understanding of the criminal justice system

Comprehensively and accurately addresses all aspect of the research report

Integrates relevant examples such as legislations, cases, media, international instruments and documents into the response

Presents a sustained, logical and cohesive report using relevant legal terminology and concepts

Locates, selects, organises legal information from a variety of sources

13-15

A

Demonstrates sustained understanding of the criminal justice system

Accurately addresses all aspect of the research report

Uses relevant examples such as legislations, cases, media, international instruments and documents into the response

Presents a logical and cohesive response using relevant legal terminology and concepts

Locates, selects and organises legal information from a variety of sources

10-12

B

Demonstrates understanding of the criminal justice system

Addresses most aspects of the research report

Makes reference to examples such as legislation, cases, media, international instruments and documents into the response

Presents a structured response using some relevant legal terminology and concepts

Locates and selects legal information from some legal sources

7-9

C

Demonstrates limited understanding of the criminal justice system

Addresses some aspects of the research report

Makes limited reference to examples such as legislations, cases, media, international instruments and documents into the response

Uses some relevant legal terminology and concepts

Locates legal information from limited sources

4-6

D

Writes in general terms about the Criminal Justice System

May address some aspect of the research report /relies on class notes and the textbook for information

May include reference to examples such as legislations, cases, media, international instruments and documents into the response

May refer to general legal terms

May locate some legal information

1-3

E

Assessment Result

/ 15

COMMENTS:

Assessment Marking Criteria

PART B & C

Criteria

Mark Range

Grade

Demonstrates extensive understanding of how the law aims to balance the rights of victims, offenders and society in the Criminal Justice System

Makes an informed judgement of the effectiveness of the law in balancing the rights of all parties in the Criminal Justice System

Integrates relevant examples such as legislations, cases, media, international instruments and documents into the response

Presents a sustained, logical and cohesive response using relevant legal terminology and concepts

Locates, selects, organises, synthesises and analyses legal information from a variety of sources with a referenced bibliography (APA format) of six or more sources

13-15

A

Demonstrates sustained understanding of how the law aims to balance the rights of victims, offenders and society in the Criminal Justice System

Makes a sound judgement about the effectiveness of the law in balancing the rights of all parties in the Criminal Justice System

Uses relevant examples such as legislations, cases, media, international instruments and documents into the response

Presents a logical and cohesive response using relevant legal terminology and concepts

Locates, selects and organises legal information from a variety of sources with a referenced bibliography (APA format) of five or more sources

10-12

B

Demonstrates understanding of how the law aims to balance the rights of victims, offenders and society in the Criminal Justice System

Makes some judgment about how the law balance the rights of all parties in the Criminal Justice System

Makes reference to examples such as legislation, cases, media, international instruments and documents into the response

Presents a structured response using some relevant legal terminology and concepts

Locates and selects legal information with a referenced bibliography (APA format) of less than five sources

7-9

C

Demonstrates limited understanding of the law and its relevance to/aim to balance the rights in the Criminal Justice System

Makes statements about how the law and its relevance to/aim to achieve justice

Makes limited reference to examples such as legislations, cases, media, international instruments and documents into the response

Uses some relevant legal terminology and concepts

Locates legal information from at least 3 sources (may/may not be accurately referenced in APA format)

4-6

D

Writes in general terms about the Criminal Justice System/relevant indictable offence

May include reference to examples such as legislations, cases, media, international instruments and documents into the response

May refer to general legal terms

May include a bibliography that is not accurately referenced in APA format / does not include a bibliography

1-3

E

Assessment Result

/ 15

COMMENTS[supanova_question]

ENGL 1201, Dr. Whalen Name: _______________ Argument Evaluation Essay Write an essay

ENGL 1201, Dr. Whalen Name: _______________

Argument Evaluation Essay

Write an essay in which you evaluate how effectively the authors state their claim and support their argument according to the elements of argument presented in course readings, handouts, discussions, and/or videos. The authors you’ll write about include

“Hi, I’m a Digital Junkie, and I suffer from Infomania” by Manoush Zomorodi – CEL p. 367-370

“Death by Information Overload” by Paul Hemp – D2L Content/Argument Evaluation

Essay Minimum Requirements

Provide at least 5 full pages of content—not counting the works cited page. (That means 5 full pages + a works cited page). Essays that are less than 5 full pages cannot receive a grade higher than C even if they are perfect in every other way.

Identify the primary claim (thesis) in each essay.

For your thesis, make a claim about how convincing each author’s argument is.

Is one argument more effective than the other?

Do both authors make convincing arguments?

Are both arguments weak?

Do both arguments make compelling arguments that contain flaws?

In your introduction, mention the arguments’ titles, authors, and where they were published.

Evaluate the effectiveness of tone and point of view in both essays.

Evaluate both essays according to the criteria on CEL pp. 455-457 and/or D2L Content handouts/videos on elements of argument, the CRAAP Test, and/or appeals.

Include in-text citations for 2 or more of these as sources in your essay.

You may also cite information from the textbook about logical fallacies, though that isn’t required.

Include MLA in-text citations for the two arguments you’re evaluating.

Create a works cited page in MLA style.

Use third-person point of view, no first- or second-person point of view.

Format and edit your essay according to the Formatting and Editing Checklist provided at the end of this document.

Due Date: See the Course Schedule

Grading Criteria for Final Draft

Skill Demonstrated

Proficient (A/B)

Adequate (B/C)

Needs Improvement (D or lower)

Introduction grabs readers’ attention, presents important background/context information, and indicates topic’s significance

Introduction identifies the thesis and/or summarizes the main claim in each author’s argument; presents the (student) writer’s thesis

Essay Content evaluates the effectiveness of each essay’s tone and point of view

Essay Content demonstrates complex thought about the topic and a creative approach to conveying the writer’s evaluation

Essay Content includes appropriate application of elements of argument, such as logic, appeals, bias, and use of support in evaluating arguments

Essay Content applies concepts from at least two sources (CEL and/or materials on D2L) as part of applying the elements of argument

Thesis is revelatory; is clear and easy to identify; indicates which argument is more convincing and why

Organization is apparent, logical, and appropriate to the topic

Central Focus unifies the essay

Paragraphs include sufficient support for the main idea(s)

Paragraphs use the MEAL Plan or are unified in another way

Transitions used to connect ideas are elegant and effective

Quotes are relevant, chosen carefully, and incorporated correctly (sandwiched); paraphrases are appropriate and correct

In-Text Citations include the 2 arguments plus 2 or more sources (see Requirements above); follow MLA style as explained in CEL chapter 16 and on the Purdue OWL

Works Cited page includes the 2 arguments plus 2 or more sources (see Requirements above); follows MLA style as explained in CEL chapter 16 and on the Purdue OWL

Third-Person Point of View is used consistently; no first- or second-person point of view is included

Grammar and Mechanics are correct. (On your essay, run-ons will be highlighted in yellow, fragments in green, spelling, word choice or other errors in pink. Second-person point of view will be in blue.)

Formatting is correct according to the guide provided at the end of the assignment sheet.

Length Requirement is met or exceeded. (See Essay Minimum Requirements above for details.)

Other/Comments

Total out of 100 Points

Note to Current Students: Your essay should be formatted exactly like this document. Delete this note before turning in your assignment.

Your first and last names

Your instructor’s name

Name of class

Draft (e.g., rough, revised, final)

Your Title Centered Here, No Bold, No Italic, or No Underlined Font

There are a few things you should do when formatting your assignment. The first is include page numbers, either centered at the bottom of each page or in the upper right corner. You can insert page numbers when using Microsoft Word by going to the “Insert” menu, clicking on “Page Number,” selecting “Bottom of Page” and choosing the option that shows the page number in the center of the page or choosing “Top of Page.” However, if you simply use the “Save As” option to save this document with a new name and then type your assignment here, page numbers will already be set up for you.

When you begin a new paragraph, indent the first line of the paragraph by hitting the “tab” key (not the spacebar) on your keyboard as I’ve done here; do not add extra white space between paragraphs. Do not hit the “Enter” key at the end of each line, as one must do on a typewriter; simply keep typing and let the computer move the words down to the next line for you. Otherwise, every time you make a change to your essay, the lines, spacing, and margins fail to align correctly. Include one space, not two, after a period between two sentences.

If you are writing an essay—as opposed to a short story or poem—avoid using second person point of view. Second person point of view means that you address the reader directly (as if writing a letter) or that you include the word “you” in your essay. I am using second person point of view here because this is a handout, not an essay; I have to address you directly to tell you how to format essays correctly. When you write an essay, however, you are writing for a broader audience and using a more formal writing style, so you should not use second person point of view.

The following checklist will help you edit your assignment for formatting and style:

Format

___ include a title specific to your essay’s topic, not “Profile Essay”

___ do not use bold or italics or underlining for the essay title

___ indent the start of each new paragraph by hitting the “Tab” key

____use 12-point font in Arial or Times New Roman

___ double-space your essay with no extra white space between paragraphs

___ set one-inch margins at the top, bottom, and sides of your document

___ include page numbers

___ put one space (not two) after each period

___ attach/upload a copy of your essay to D2L Assignments. Do not link to a document stored on OneDrive or Google Drive. I cannot always access documents linked that way, so you will not receive feedback on your essay and may be docked points for late submission if I have to ask you to resubmit your essay.

Writing Style

___ eliminate any second-person point of view references. (Tip: Hold down the Ctrl key and hit the F key to find all instances of the word “you” in your essay.) Once you find them, name the person or group you’re writing about, such as parents, students, Americans, women, etc.

___ eliminate the phrase “in conclusion” from the conclusion paragraph

___ capitalize the names of specific people, places, things, or titles (Examples: Facebook, Valley Fair, North Hennepin Community College, Minneapolis)

___ spell out numbers zero through nine; use numerals for 10 and higher. Spell out any number that begins a sentence (e.g., Forty-two students registered for the class.)

___ use italics for book, magazine, newspaper, journal, website and movie titles

___ use “quotation marks” for article and webpage titles

___ capitalize the names of specific people, places, things, or titles (Examples: Facebook, Valley Fair, North Hennepin Community College, Minneapolis)

___ refer to a person by their full name the first time you mention them in your essay; then use only their last name from that point on

___ spell numbers zero through nine; use numerals for 10 and up. Spell any number that begins a sentence (e.g., Forty-two students registered for the class.).

Citing Sources in MLA

___ include an in-text citation for any idea or information that comes from a source

___ for in-text citations, place quotation marks before the citation parentheses and the period after the citation parentheses

___ for in-text citations, do not include a comma between the author’s last name and the page number

___ for all citations, make sure what appears in the in-text citation matches exactly the first word(s) in its corresponding works cited entry.

___ for the works cited page, the first line of each entry should overhang the other lines (opposite of indenting a paragraph)

___ for the works cited page, alphabetize the entries

___ for the works cited page, place the title of that page in 12-point font, centered at the top. Do not use bold, italics, or underlined font for the page’s title.[supanova_question]

Please follows directions. I have provided a start for each response to each question that must be incorporated into Essay

Please follows directions. I have provided a start for each response to each question that must be incorporated into Essay

Viewing Chinatown (dir. Roman Polanski, 1974) Across 110th Street (dir. Barry Shear, 1972) The Long Goodbye (dir. Robert Altman, Essay

Viewing Chinatown (dir. Roman Polanski, 1974) Across 110th Street (dir. Barry Shear, 1972) The Long Goodbye (dir. Robert Altman, Essay. Viewing Chinatown (dir. Roman Polanski, 1974) Across 110th Street (dir. Barry Shear, 1972) The Long Goodbye (dir. Robert Altman, Essay.

Viewing
Chinatown (dir. Roman Polanski, 1974)
Across 110th Street (dir. Barry Shear, 1972)
The Long Goodbye (dir. Robert Altman, 1972)
The Conversation (dir. Francis Ford Coppola, 1974)

Reading
“The Murders in the Rue Morgue,” Edgar Allan Poe, 1841
The Big Sleep, Raymond Chandler, 1939
The Big Clock, Kenneth Fearing, 1946
The Crying of Lot 49, Thomas Pynchon, 1965

The instructions are in the attachment.[supanova_question]

Viewing Chinatown (dir. Roman Polanski, 1974) Across 110th Street (dir. Barry Shear, 1972) The Long Goodbye (dir. Robert Altman, Essay

Viewing Chinatown (dir. Roman Polanski, 1974) Across 110th Street (dir. Barry Shear, 1972) The Long Goodbye (dir. Robert Altman, Essay

The previous writing was on order # 356182721 The goal of the assignment is to expand on your previous

The previous writing was on order # 356182721 The goal of the assignment is to expand on your previous. The previous writing was on order # 356182721 The goal of the assignment is to expand on your previous.

The previous writing was on order # 356182721

The goal of the assignment is to expand on your previous writing assignment (Writing Assignment 2) while focusing specifically on one or two works discussed this semester. This means that your Research Essay should cover one or two works that fit within the time period that you discussed in your second writing assignment. For example, if you discussed Realism, “Chickamauga” would be a good work to consider discussing. Note: while you are free to discuss two works in your essay, I ask that the two be connected by an overarching point in your essay if you decide to discuss more than one work. In other words, the two works should not seem to be two separate essay sections; rather, they should be compared/contrasted with a relevant analytical argument. And 3 sources from Galileo.

4 pages total add on to the previous work and 3 sources from Galileo.[supanova_question]

http://www.sussex.ac.uk/skillshub/?id=256 https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/research_and_citation/apa_style/apa_formatting_and_style_guide/general_format.html What is critical thinking? We often make the mistake of

http://www.sussex.ac.uk/skillshub/?id=256

https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/research_and_citation/apa_style/apa_formatting_and_style_guide/general_format.html

What is critical thinking? We often make the mistake of confusing being critical with being negative or “nit-picking” and this is unfortunate. Anybody can adopt a negative position to any point of view simply by saying “no” but this is not being critical, more often than not this is simply being awkward.

In this era of so called ‘alternative facts’ it has never been more important to question our sources of information. Critical thinking involves looking beyond the obvious surface issues, asking questions about motivation and purpose. Being critical requires you to not only gather appropriate data and information but to examine it carefully and question its reliability and authority.

Checklist Guide

One way of helping to focus your critical thinking is by considering the 6 W’s:

Who by? Who has produced a piece of information is a crucial issue. Everyone has a perspective, a point of view, that can’t be avoided. Being aware of a person’s point of view, background and even prejudices helps us to interpret their work and better understand why they are saying what they are saying.

Why? Why something has been written or said is a very important critical issue. We are bombarded by information these days and each piece is presented to serve a particular purpose. Knowing why something something has been written will help in identifying the underlying motivation of the writer or producer and thus help us decide whether the information is valuable to us or not.

What? What evidence is the information based upon? In reading a book or watching the TV or listening to teachers it is important to ask questions about the basis for what is being said. It is important not to believe something just because somebody says so, we need to know why they are saying what they are saying, otherwise it is simply gossip. Newspaper articles can often be accused of this, making claims based on little or no evidence. 

When? The period in history when a piece of information was presented is very important, especially in fields where there is rapid development such as IT. There is little use writing an essay about the current state of mobile phone technology based upon a book written in the 1980’s. 

Where? Geographical location is often an important critical factor. Where something was produced will often make a difference to the kind of information being presented and the way it is presented. Healthcare issues, for example, will differ widely between developed and developing countries. Attitudes to law, religion and society vary a great deal from country to country. 

Who for? The target audience for a presentation of information will be an important issue when critically evaluating its value and significance. Writers can aim their work very specifically at the young or the old, male or female, different political groups, different social groups and so on. Some writings or media productions are aimed at the general public others are aimed at a small section. Some information is packaged for easy consumption by people with limited education some is tailored to the needs of students, teachers and experts. It is important when studying to ask whether your source material is pitched at the appropriate level – the “Ladybird Book of Policemen” would not, for example, be an appropriate textbook for an undergraduate essay on criminality and policing in the UK.

Final Comments

Thinking critically is a skill that is taught at school and university BUT its main purpose is to better equip you to understand the world, to make more sense of the vast amount of information that is available to us and to avoid, being manipulated. It is a life skill.

We all act critically in our everyday lives. We don’t simply accept gossip and random information and we certainly shouldn’t accept everything we see on TV or in the media as true and authoritative. It is vital in our everyday lives to be able to question why people are saying things to us be it the government, our friends or the advertising industry. If we accepted everything we heard and read and saw, without question, we would be open to constant abuse and manipulation. To buy what we really need, to vote for who we really support and to befriend those who truly care for us we have to think critically.[supanova_question]

Please read the following and article: Cartwright, James. “What Every Designer Needs

The previous writing was on order # 356182721 The goal of the assignment is to expand on your previous Please read the following and article:

Cartwright, James. “What Every Designer Needs to Know About Copyright Law.” AIGA Eye on Design. 2 December 2016. Online. https://eyeondesign.aiga.org/what-young-designers-need-to-know-about-copyright-law/ (Links to an external site.)

Writings should consist of 50% reflection and 50% critical analysis relating to this article. The length of response should be between 2-4 pages, 12-font, double-spaced with the Times New Roman typeface. These can be written in the first person, as they are essentially expressing the writer’s evaluations. When quoting, be sure to give credit to the author.

What to include in your paper:?

Introductory Paragraph – This is where you introduce the reader to what you are about to present to them and identify the reading you are writing about. Present a summary of the main ideas (an analysis) from this reading.

Do you agree, disagree or do you have mixed feelings about the reading? What about the article that makes you agree/disagree or have mixed feelings about it?

What is the difference between copyright and trademark?

Could the issue with Tuesday Bassen and Zara be resolved in another way??

Has someone else used something you created and made it their own? Did someone use an image/design you created and didn’t give you any credit??

Include a real-life example of a copyright violation/infringement (it could be in any field- music, advertising, photography, art, movies, video games, etc.)

A conclusion to wrap up what you previously discussed in your paper.

Line 1: Title (optional)
    

          Paragraph 1: Introductory Paragraph – This is where you introduce the reader to what you are about to present to them, and identify the reading you are writing about. Present a summary of the main ideas (an analysis) from this reading. “When you quote someone, put it in between quotation marks like this (no italics needed) and then include a citation like the one you see here in parenthesis:” (Author, Page Number). Be sure to include the source of your quotation in the “works cited” page.

          Paragraph 2: Do you agree, disagree, or do you have mixed feelings about the reading? What about the article that makes you agree/disagree or have mixed feelings about it? Expand on these questions.

          Paragraph 3: What is the difference between copyright and trademark? Expand on this question.

          Paragraph 4: Could the issue regarding the issue with Tuesday Bassen and Zara be resolved in another way?? Expand on this question.

          Paragraph 5: Have someone else used something you created and made it their own? Did someone use ?an image/design you created and didn’t give you any credit?? Expand on these questions.

No I did not experience this before.

          Paragraph 6: Include a real-life example of a copyright violation/infringement (it could be in any field- music, advertising, photography, art, movies, video games, etc.)

Please cite any sources from the internet.

          Final Paragraph: A conclusion to wrap up what you previously discussed in your paper.

Works Cited

Cartwright, James. “What Every Designer Needs to Know About Copyright Law.” AIGA Eye on Design. 2 December 2016. Online. https://eyeondesign.aiga.org/what-young-designers-need-to-know-about-copyright-law/ (Links to an external site.)[supanova_question]

Name: Date: Class: CRITICAL THINKING ASSIGNMENT 1 Instructions: After reading the attached

Name: Date: Class:

CRITICAL THINKING ASSIGNMENT 1

Instructions: After reading the attached article “The Ins and Outs of DNA Transfer in Bacteria” by Inês Chen, Peter J. Christie and David Dubnau, answer the questions below:

When looking at the transformation and conjugation processes, how can genome plasticity lead to evolution in bacteria? REMEMBER: Evolution involves selection of the fittest, think about how bacteria can be fit and what they can “get” from their bacteria friends to be even more “in shape.”

FIND THE ARTICLE HERE

This document will be checked for plagiarism, so do not copy your answers from anywhere. Each answer needs to have at least 80 words (To count words, highlight your answer and click on Review then Word count).

What are the main questions answered by the article? (Briefly explain figures 2 and 3.)[supanova_question]

Read the case study and answer the questions

Susans Consulting Company (SCC) – Problem OverviewSusans Consulting Company (SCC) has been in business for ten years and has experienced a significant turnover in the project management group, which has prompted senior leadership to investigate.
A preliminary review by senior leadership has determined that Project Managers are frustrated with the amount of required project management documentation, which has impacted their ability to manage projects successfully.
A recent review of the project management process has determined that SCC has spent between 30-40% of its total project budget on projects’ overhead costs to include project management costs. A review of industry standards is between 5-15% higher than most companies. In addition, senior leaders found that projects are being delivered between 25% and 50% over budget and late 95% of the time.
SCC Request: SCC has reached out to your team because you are experts in defining project management processes and delivering projects on time. The SCC request includes the following:
The development of a new project management process which at a minimum should include the following:
The ability to track issues, risks, changes
The ability to view project activities consists of a view of what has been completed and what activities the team is working on over the next reporting period
The company must have a view into total life cycle project costs to include what has been spent to date, baseline budget, any changes to the budget, remaining budget, and cost of the project at completion

In addition, to the new process request, SCC has a new project they need to complete by the end of the year with a limited budget and no project management staff.
Answer these questions?
Identify Project scope statement
Identify at least ten potential stakeholders for your project and describe about them

done
Seen
1 min ago[supanova_question]

Week 6 Organizational Ethics Presentation

This week, you will submit a video presentation. Your presentation must include both audio and visual components and be professional in nature.
You will submit your final presentation here for grading, and you will submit it to the discussion board this week as a draft for your peers to review and as a final product to share. See the discussion board for details
Choose a topic below.
Taken from the assigned reading in Butts chapter 12, page 401, “Ethical Reflection: Typical Unethical or Illegal Behaviors in Organizations”

Create a presentation of 10-15 slides or screens excluding the title and references.Your slides/screen should include titles, main ideas, bullet points, and relevant images, charts, graphs, etc.
In your presentation:

Describe an ethical situation, based on the chosen topic, that can get in the nurse’s way of practicing ethically. Describe the situation clearly and concisely.
Identify how this situation relates to one provision within the Code of Ethics for Nurses.
Identify two ethical principles that may arise when facing this situation.
Discuss how a nurse might lessen the impact of the situation on the nurse’s practice.
In addition to the course texts, cite and reference a minimum of two (2) additional scholarly sources to support your work.
Close with a summary of your topic, and APA formatted reference slide(s).

done
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2 mins ago[supanova_question]

HUM/115 v10 Title ABC/123 vX Page 2 of 2 Critical Thinking Scenario

HUM/115 v10

Title

ABC/123 vX

Page 2 of 2

Critical Thinking Scenario

Sally is a 34-year-old woman who works in the customer service department for a small company that sells printers. Her job involves speaking with customers and addressing their concerns for 8 hours a day. Unfortunately for Sally, customers only reach out to her department when there is an issue with their printers.

Once, after a long day of listening to customer complaints, she felt drained and agitated. She wanted to relax, so she went to dinner with some colleagues. The colleagues began discussing an issue at work that was causing friction between departments. Sally did not agree with her colleagues’ viewpoint on the causes of that friction, but she did not want to say anything because she felt she did not know enough about the topic. For the remaining part of the discussion, Sally nodded her head and appeared to agree with her colleagues to avoid confrontation. After this dinner, she decided not spend time with these colleagues outside of work anymore.

The next day at work, Sally spoke with a customer who wanted to dispute the terms in the warranty for the product. The customer explained to Sally that he understood the terms of the warranty, but the printer was vital to his business. He explained how the ability to print materials equated to his ability to feed his family. He asked if there was any way Sally could help. Sally imagined herself in the customer’s position and decided to find additional options for the customer. In the end, Sally was able to de-escalate the situation and assist the customer.

This interaction with the customer led her to question their warranty, and she decided to speak with her manager to get it changed. She stated that the current warranty was inadequate because it did not provide customers with enough time to determine if the product would function appropriately. She provided supporting evidence to show that many printers failed only 1 month after the 1-year warranty expired. She also calculated the number of customers with failed printers that bought a replacement printer from the company she worked for. Sally proposed that the warranty be extended to 18 months. Unfortunately, her manager did not agree with her argument nor provide an argument against extending the warranty; instead, he asked, “How can you argue for a change in the warranty when you are late to work most of the time?” Sally decided she would continue to argue for changing the warranty with the company’s leadership, and, after several meetings, Sally was able to get her proposal approved and the warranty extended.

Copyright 2021 by University of Phoenix. All rights reserved.

Copyright 2021 by University of Phoenix. All rights reserved.[supanova_question]

Critical Thinking Report Choose ONE of these 3 scenarios and write a

Critical Thinking Report

Choose ONE of these 3 scenarios and write a 2 page report explaining what decision you would make and why. In order to make your decision, go around the pie chart and use each of the 8 elements of thought to add to your decision-making. Read the sample report to see what kind of critical thinking process I am looking for (though you can use the 8 elements in any order that feels comfortable for you).

1. Read the following scenario in detail and consider the related questions. A political party proposed a legislation to make it mandatory for couples to be assessed and evaluated (pass an examination) before conception. The party spokesperson proposed the following argument: most social problems are rooted in the growth processes of children. For instance, children subject to frequent physical punishment by parents are prone to be criminals in adulthood. Also, distanced relations between parents and children impact negatively on the latter’s social skills in adulthood whereas children from impoverished families often do less well academically and possess inferior self-image and confidence than same-aged peers. The spokesperson gave examples that require a certain level of competency or qualification: driving requires licenses, migration to foreign countries requires approval, and teaching requires the obtaining of certain qualifications. The rearing of young is a greater responsibility that directly affects the future development of the society. The government should evaluate couples planning conception to decide which are more suited for raising children.

Question: Would you want to have rules for who can have children and who cannot, and what rules would they be? If you ultimately decide not to have rules, explain that decision too.

2. Please read carefully the following scenario, and think about the related questions. You live in a backward and remote island nation. For the past a hundred years or so, people on the island are self-sustained, living on farming and herding. Neighboring the small island is a big, prosperous and advanced nation. Recently, using their instruments, specialists in that nation detected that within three weeks, the small island will be hit by intense earthquakes. The quakes could last months, generating a tsunami that will drown the entire island. When the neighboring nation received the news, they sent a warning to your island. They urged you and your people to leave immediately. The nation also agreed to temporarily accommodate the island’s inhabitants. Your livestock, however, were forbidden to enter. The island government accepted this arrangement and asked its people to take shelter in the neighboring nation for at least a few months. This was met with strong objection from the local people on the island. They claim for hundreds of years people here had used animal behavior and weather changes to predict earthquakes, which had always been accurate. They predicted no earthquakes in the region around the island any time soon. They also considered the technology in the neighboring nation unreliable. Moreover, if they left behind all livestock and farmland for months, everything would have died before the people could come back. The next year’s provisions will be all but gone.

Question: think carefully and weigh your options, and decide what you would do if you were an islander: would you stay or would you go? Go around the pie chart and explain how each of the 8 elements adds to your decision-making.

3. A certain political party proposed that the government should determine whether a citizen has the right to vote judging by his/her academic qualifications and payable taxes. The political party proposed that only university graduates or individuals whose payable taxes exceed a certain amount would have the right to vote in the elections. The spokesman of the political party pointed out that history had taught us the one-person, one-vote system did not deliver the best leader to the people. Part of the population did not have the required wisdom or knowledge to judge the abilities of a candidate, and thus were easily deceived. Others voted arbitrarily without knowing the background, platform and vision of the candidates, resulting in the prevalence of “erratic voting”. The party believes that highly educated citizens should be given the right to vote, because knowledge and wisdom helps one discriminate between the true abilities of different candidates. Leaders chosen by better educated citizens naturally bring better welfare to the people. Besides, payable taxes represents one’s contribution to the society, therefore citizens who contribute more should be given the right to vote.

Make a decision whether it is better to have rule in place that only allow educated people to vote. Use the pie chart and explain what each element of thought adds to your decision-making.[supanova_question]

What causes people to become whom they do? The social process theory

What causes people to become whom they do? The social process theory views that criminality is a function of people’s interactions with various organizations institutions and processes in society. With in social process theory are several independent branches: social learning theory, social control theory, and social reaction (labeling) theory. Social learning theory believes people are born good but learn overtime to be bad; social control theory assumes people are born bad and must be controlled to be good; and social reaction theory assumes that whether good or bad, people are shaped, directed, and influenced by the evaluation of others (Siegel, 2019). We will be reviewing the key points to the social reaction theory as well as consequences of labeling to make our final determination as to whether negative labels are damaging, and if positive labels help insulate children from crime producing forces within their environment.

One of the key points to the social reaction theory is that behaviors that are considered criminal are subjective. For instance, crimes are only considered bad because people label them that way. The only difference between an excusable act and a criminal one is subject to change depending on the audience. In a court of law, a consensual sexual encounter versus that of forcible rape is determined by a jury’s interpretation of what took place, and who’s story seems to correlate best with the evidence. But since juries are different from case to case, the same details can be presented and interpreted differently depending on the jury. Other acts such as abortion, gambling, or possession of marijuana are legal in some locales but illegal in others. Those illegal acts may also become legal over time.

Another key point to the social reaction theory hinges on those who are in power and their definition of what constitutes a crime, at that time. Criminal law is therefore strongly influenced by the values of that ruler. American sociologist Howard Becker coined the term moral entrepreneurs to refer to individuals in power that create moral rules to reflect their values rather than any universal standards of right and wrong. Someone who campaigns for prison reform or wants laws passed to restrict abortion rights are examples of moral entrepreneurs.

Defining labels not just as an act, but also as the actor is another key point to the social reaction theory. Terms such as “intelligent” or “hardworking” advocate for a person’s value even before meeting them.

Positive labels like these can improve overall social standing and even improve one’s self-image. And research has shown that those labeled with one positive trait, such as being honest, are perceived to have other positive traits, for example being smart or detail-oriented (Jackson, Hunter, Hodge, 1995).

The final key point to the social reaction theory is that both positive and negative labels carry with them subjective interpretations of behavior. For instance, someone who is labeled as a troublemaker is also someone who can be perceived as being troublesome. These messages have a significant effect on how people view themselves, and how they see their value as “society” interprets them. If others view us as kind, attractive, and fun to be around that will have a positive effect on how we see and value ourselves.

If we are viewed as unattractive, stupid, or hard to get along with, that too will negatively shape our self image.

People can also be stigmatized by labels. Stigmatization happens when labeling causes negative enduring ffects on a person’s self-image and social interactions (Siegel, 2019). Those derived from rumors or unfounded claims can be immense. Effects are further compounded if the devalued status is reiterated

by a significant other and may lead to permanent harm to the subject, as they reinforce feelings of “less than”, isolation, and detachment. If the visibility of the label and manner and severity with which it’s applied is great enough individuals will become increasingly committed to deviant behavior (selflabeling) and may find themselves turning to others who have been similarly stigmatized for support and companionship. People may also join clicks with similarly out casted people who facilitate the increasingly antisocial behavior. Retrospective reading is then used to often reassess the person’s past to fit a current generalized label. This label then becomes the basis of their personal identity by reiterating the original negative labels and stigmatizing the offenders.

Based on the readings in this unit I do believe that positive labels help insulate children from crime producing forces in their environment. I believe that when children recognize that others find good in them, even if they can’t see it in themselves, they searched for where those positive beliefs come from.

This occurs, I believe, for much of the same reasons that attending church helps to reduce drug usage in young people. Because they have created a community around them that holds them to a higher standard, and deviating from that, would result in their community’s disappointment. In my experience being labeled as “strong” has helped me to dig deeper to embody that during difficult times where I wanted to just run and hide. I did this so I wouldn’t let others down and to show that I could live up to their admiration for such a positive label.

Resources:

1. Siegel, Larry J (2019). Criminology: The Core. (7th ed.). Boston, MA: Cengage Learning.

2. Jackson, Linda, Hunter, John, and Hodge, Carol, “Physical Attractiveness and Intellectual

Competence: A Meta-Analytic Review,” Social Psychology Quarterly 58 (1995): 108-122.[supanova_question]

Answer these three questions and submit to me ASAP via email: Question

Answer these three questions and submit to me ASAP via email:

Question One:

Identify and define the five stages of crime analysis and what type of cases would each be used. Provide an example.

 

Question Two:

Research a case where at least three stages of crime analysis was used to identify a suspect, Be specific with the case, date, agency, and crime.  Hint: You best source research may be to search news!

Question Three:

What did you learn in this class that will be useful to you as:

Administration of Justice Major

A Criminal Justice Professional, or

As a non-criminal justice major?

Your response needs to be a minimum of 150 words, spelling grammar and critical thinking will be evaluated. Do not just take a chapter or term from the book and copy of Wikipedia it, support your answer. Plagiarism will result in an overall grade reduction.[supanova_question]

CRIJ 3300 Applied Research Methods in Criminal Justice Dr. Dickinson Term project

CRIJ 3300 Applied Research Methods in Criminal Justice

Dr. Dickinson

Term project instructions

For this assignment, you will create several sections of a research proposal. You must write a short paper that states 1) your research question and hypothesis (if applicable); 2) the population of interest; 3) the units of analysis; 4) the variables of interest; 5) the background and rationale for your proposed project—this section must include 4 outside references; 6) your sampling strategy; 7) any potential threats to validity; 8) any possible ethical and practical issues; and 9) a reference page. The paper must also include a short survey consisting of 20-30 survey questions. Details about what I expect for each of these parts are listed below. **Please note that you are not actually going to conduct this project—it is just a proposal for a project. This assignment is worth 100 points.

Important date:

Final draft due 7/31 @ 11:59pm MST

Submit paper on Blackboard (I recommend doing this early as this will run the paper through SafeAssign—this way you can check yourself for accidental plagiarism)

I will deduct 5 points from your total score for each day you are late submitting the paper on Blackboard up to a maximum of 25 points. If you are more than 5 days late submitting the paper on Blackboard, you will receive a 0 on the assignment.

The paper:

The actual paper should be written in narrative form (i.e., full sentences, full paragraphs). This paper should be from 5 – 9 pages long. This section of the term project is worth 70 points. To get all the points for this assignment, you must address each of the points listed below. The grading rubric directly responds to this list of instructions.

Sections/Headings: The paper should include each of the following sections. They should all begin with a bold-faced, centered heading.

Research question: In this section you will tell me what your research question is. That is, what are you proposing to study?

Remember, that this is a survey project. Hence, you must create a research question that can be answered using a survey.

Remember that surveys are good at capturing opinions, perceptions, etc.

Some research questions will have independent and dependent variables (e.g., “Are UTEP students that were raised by drug using parents more likely to smoke marijuana?”; “Are former victims of crime more likely to own guns?”). Other research questions are exploratory and will not have independent and dependent variables (e.g., “How do UTEP students feel about gun control?”; How should sex offenders be treated after release from prison?”).

For questions with independent and dependent variables you must state a hypothesis or hypotheses.

Population of interest: In this section you will tell me the population that you are interested in finding something out about? For instance, is it all Americans? Is it all Texans? All El Paso residents? All college students? Etc.

Remember that the population is the group that you are trying to find something out about. The sample is the group that you are actually surveying.

Units of analysis: In this section you will tell me what units of analysis will your proposed study examine? Individuals, Groups, Social Organizations, or Social Artifacts? Use one of these terms when describing your unit of analysis.

Variables of interest: This section will likely be 1-3 pages long. Here you will tell me:

What variables you will be collecting data on. If you have independent and dependent variables, clearly identify them. Some projects will not have independent and dependent variables. Also identify any control variables in your study—that is, variables that may have some influence on your results. Common control variables include demographic ones such as age, race, gender, and social class.

The key part of this section is for you to provide conceptual definitions of your variables. Do not assume that I know how YOU conceptualize these variables. Provide a clear definition of each variable so that I know exactly how you do and do not define them. Be specific—if you are talking about crime, what do you mean when you refer to crime in YOUR proposed study? If you’re talking about recidivism, are you talking about re-arrest, parole violations, etc.?

You should also note which of the survey measures relate to your variables.

Example: “One of my key variables of interest is drug use. I define drug use as the use of an illicit drug such as marijuana, cocaine, heroin, or methamphetamine, as well as the use of prescription drugs in a manner not prescribed or the use of prescription drugs prescribed to other individuals. Survey questions 7-15 are measures of this variable.”

Prior research/Rationale and Background: For this section, you must find four outside sources that cover either your proposed topic/research question or something related to it. You must then provide short reviews of this literature that are 1-2 paragraphs long.

The four sources must be academic/scholarly sources. Websites, popular magazines, blogs, vlogs, newspapers, etc. do not count. Articles from peer-reviewed journals and books are appropriate.

The book assigned for the course does not count as an outside source.

I recommend going to Google Scholar and typing in your topic as the search terms. Most of the sources that come up are acceptable for this assignment. If on campus, there will likely be hyperlinks to the materials to the right of the respective articles that will take to a webpage wherein you can download them. If off campus you can go to this webpage https://admin.utep.edu/Default.aspx?tabid=74367 and download the UTEP VPN onto your computer. Then connect through the VPN and you will be able to gain access to sources just as if you were on campus.

Sampling strategy: In this section you will tell me what sampling strategy you are going to use.

State what sampling strategy are you going to use—be specific (i.e., do not say probability sampling or non-probability sampling—state a specific method).

Describe the sampling method—describe the steps of that method.

Describe why it is appropriate to use.

Threats to validity: Discuss any potential threats to validity that your study design may face.

State at least two threats to validity that may affect the results of your proposed study.

Define these threats to validity.

Ethical issues: Discuss any ethical issues the proposed study may face and how you are planning to eliminate and/or minimize them.

Describe one or more ethical issues you may have to consider.

Describe what measures you would include in the study to counter these ethical issues.

References

The references must be in APA format. Please make sure to include all the references used in the study.

Survey:

You must also include a survey that includes questions that can be used to collect data on the variables of interest and their relationships with each other. This part of the term project is worth 30 points. To get all the points for this assignment, you must address each of the points listed below. The grading rubric directly responds to this list of instructions.

The survey should look as professional as possible. To this end, please be careful to pay attention to the spacing of questions (they should not be too crowded), the ordering of questions, whether questions overlap from page to page (they should not), and the overall ‘look’ of the survey.

Also make certain to pay attention to whether your questions and answer categories are exclusive and exhaustive and are worded properly (e.g., no double-barreled questions, no negative questions).

The survey must include: 1) Open and close-ended questions; 2) at least one contingency or matrix question.

The survey must contain questions relating to all of your variables. I will also gauge whether your questions (i.e., measures) best measure the concept you are trying to measure.

The survey must include at least 20-25 questions. It is permissible to take questions from pre-existing surveys. If you choose to do this, however, you must provide a reference to the source where you located these examples on your reference page.

Citation and references:

When using pre-existing questions or referencing the ideas of others that are not your own (as you will in the prior research/rational and background section) please use APA formatting. Refer to http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/01/

for APA guidelines. The reference section will be the very last part of the paper section of this assignment. IMPORTANT: Please only use APA formatting for your in-text and reference page citations.

Writing:

This exercise will require that you write clearly and concisely. If you require assistance in writing, I strongly urge you to seek assistance from the writing center. You will be judged on grammar and spelling as well as content so make sure that you revise and edit your paper. Do not use contractions!!!

Writing suggestions for paper:

Avoid first-and-second-person (I, me, my, we, our).

Avoid slang and clichés (since the beginning of time, putting the cart before the horse, better said than done, etc.).

Do not use contractions in formal writing (can’t, wouldn’t, don’t, etc.).

Be consistent with verb tense. A common mistake is to alternate between present and past tense.

Make sure that you do not use plural verbs with singular nouns or vice versa.

Avoid over-generalizing statements such as “Most people think” & “Everybody knows.”

Answer the question that you are asked. Read the assignment questions carefully.

Format:

The paper should meet the following formatting requirements. Points will be deducted for failing to comply:

Must be typed!

12-pt. black Times New Roman font

Double-spaced

1-inch margins all around

Page numbered in lower right corner

Indent first line of each paragraph

No extra lines between paragraphs

Correct spelling, punctuation, and grammar

What you are going to turn in:

This is how I want you to organize the various parts of the term project when turning it in.

Title page—please include the name of the assignment, your name, my name, the course number and name, the semester, and overall page length of all sections combined. Please see below for an example title page.

The paper

The survey

Example title page:

Term project assignment

Your name here

Dr. Dickinson

CRIJ 3300 Applied Research Methods in Criminal Justice

Summer 2021

insert # here pages

7[supanova_question]

CRIM 3100 Final paper guidelines The requirement of the final paper is

CRIM 3100 Final paper guidelines

The requirement of the final paper is that students employ one or more contemporary theoretical perspectives to analyze a specific case study involving the relationship between crime and community. Students are welcome to write on any topic they wish as long as it conforms to that central requirement. Some students prefer more specific guidelines, so I have prepared a series of sample topics complete with suggested literature (see references section and also see Moodle — many of these studies are uploaded).

If you choose to write your paper on a topic other than the examples here, please contact me ahead of time to run your ideas by me. This is not compulsory, but it is highly recommended, and will probably be helpful to you.

Your paper should be 8–10 double-spaced pages in a standard pt.12 font (e.g. Times New Roman or Helvetica) with standard margins (page count does not include references and cover pages). You should indent or leave an extra single line between paragraphs — not both. Papers must included at least ten references; at least eight of your references must be ones that you have found yourself (i.e. you can use course materials and the suggested papers below, but must find additional sources yourself). Citations should follow strict APA style. Headings for sections are encouraged, but keep them to a necessary minimum (e.g. Introduction, Analysis, Discussion, Conclusion, References).

Case Study #1

Community Policing

Studies have shown that relationships between police and communities are essential factors in the success of community policing programs. What type of factors can affect these relationships, and what are the specific effects of problematic relationships or breakdowns in relationships between police and communities?

Identify several existing studies of community policing and develop your own analysis or explanations for some of the factors that can have detrimental or positive effects on community policing efforts.

Some factors that you might want to consider: cultural differences/similarities between police and community members, socioeconomic characteristics of neighborhoods, police tactics, ideological context of community policing efforts.

The references section includes some community policing studies to get you started. All of these resources are available through the KPU library website.

Case Study #2

Power, ideology and policing

Our course has explored the role of ideology and power in shaping the ways communities are policed and controlled, and also the ways communities are structured. You may select a specific community and explain how ideology and/or powerful interests have transformed the ways this community is structured and regulated or represented as a “problem community” (See Evans).

Possible topics and references ?

?

Colonialism and Indigenous communities (Macleod and Rollason 1997; Nettelbeck & Smandych 2010; Satzewich 1996)

Capitalism and working class people & “flawed consumers” (Coleman & Sim, 2000; Coleman, Tombs & Whyte 2005).

Case Study #3

Your community

You may wish to use concepts covered in class, Evans’ book, and/or Herbert’s book to analyze or discuss a crime related issue that affects or shapes a community that you belong to or a community that you are aware of.

Note: in studying local communities of any kind, you may draw on your own experiences of those communities, any published material relating to those communities, or anecdotal evidence about them — but you may not conduct original research with human participants (e.g. conducting interviews) unless you have already secured human research ethics review approval (which is unlikely unless you are already part of a study). You are allowed to do research that does not involve human participants (e.g. taking photographs of, and notes on, the physical urban environment that you are interested in studying). As always, with any original research of crime-related issues that involves visiting a specific research site, please take all precautions for your safety.

Possible topic and questions

Neighborhood & crime?

Does your neighborhood conform to or challenge any of Marcuse’s urban community types? How does the community manage its own crime and disorder issues through (a) physical environment, (b) interpersonal relationships, (c) interactions with “state” crime control authorities?

Situational crime prevention

Identify an area/business/community that exhibits interesting or novel approaches to crime control that employ CPTED and/or situational crime prevention techniques. Write about how this case study challenges or builds on some of the ideas that we have discussed in class.

Case Study #4

Theory option

Some students may wish to write a theory-based paper that focuses on ideas and concepts rather than a concrete case study. If you choose this option, your conclusion should be about broad trends or possible future directions or new tendencies in community crime-related issues, rather than concrete observations about a specific community. Here are some examples of possible theoretical topics and related articles that might give you some ideas.

Neoliberalism and its continued transformation of community space (Herbert & Brown 2006). Capitalism and its effects on situational crime prevention (Hayward 2007).

References

Case Study #1

Bohm, R. M., Reynolds, M., & Holmes, S. T. (2000). Perceptions of neighborhood problems and their solutions: Implications for community policing. Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management 23, 439-465.

Grinc, R. M. (1994). Angels in marble: Problems in stimulating community involvement in community policing. Crime & Delinquency, 40, 437–468.

Krivo, L. J., & Peterson, R. D. (1996). Extremely disadvantaged neighborhoods and urban crime. Social Forces, 75, 619-650.

Skogan, W. G. (2004). Community policing: Can it work? Belmont, CA: Wadsworth. Stein, R. E. & Griffith, C. (2015). Resident and police perceptions of the neighborhood:

implications for community policing. Criminal Justice Policy Review 28(2), 139–154

Case Study #2

Coleman, R. & Sim, J. (2000). ‘You’ll never walk alone’: CCTV surveillance, order and neo- liberal rule in Liverpool city centre. British Journal of Sociology, 51(4), 623–639?

Coleman, R., Tombs, S. & Whyte, D. (2005). Capital, crime control and statecraft in the entrepreneurial city. Urban Studies 42(13), 2511–2530

Macleod, R.C., & Rollason, H. (1997). ‘Restrain the lawless savages’: Native defendants in the criminal courts of the North West Territories, 1878–1885. Journal of Historical Sociology, 10, 157–183.

Nettelbeck, A. & Smandych, R. (2010). Policing indigenous peoples on two colonial frontiers: Australia’s mounted police and Canada’s North-West Mounted Police. Australian & New Zealand Journal of Criminology, 2, 356–375

Satzewich, V. (1996). ‘Where’s the beef?’: Cattle killing, rations policy and First Nations ‘criminality’ in southern Alberta, 1892–1895. Journal of Historical Sociology, 9, 188–212.?

Case Study #3

For references, consult the “further reading” and references sections of Evans & Herbert, and also the uploaded Marcuse articles.

Case Study #4

Hayward, K. (2007). Situational crime prevention and its discontents: Rational choice theory versus the ‘Culture of Now’. Social Policy & Administration 41(3), 232–250

Herbert, S. & Brown, E. (2006). Conceptions of space and crime in the punitive neoliberal city. Antipode: A Radical Journal of Geography 38(4), 755–777[supanova_question]

BUSI 710 Creating A Problem Statement Assignment Instructions Overview The foundation of

BUSI 710

Creating A Problem Statement Assignment Instructions

Overview

The foundation of any doctoral dissertation or project is a well-crafted problem statement. This exercise will allow you to develop and fine-tune a problem statement.

Instructions

Identify a problem within the literature that needs further examination. Review the white paper on Effective Problem Statements and craft a problem statement for the path you desire to explore (Ph.D. or D.B.A.). Depending on the direction you head these will look slightly different. Make sure to thoroughly substantiate the problem with scholarly research. Keep in mind that a problem statement should not exceed 250 words.

Academic Research Problem Statements (Ph.D.)

Academic research problem statements should begin exactly as follows: The problem to be addressed is… Academic Research Problems identify the gap in the literature that needs to be explored and is well supported by scholarly research. What hasn’t been studied that needs to be studied?

Applied Research Problem Statements (D.B.A.)

Applied research problem statements should begin with a general problem. The general problem to be addressed is… Likewise in Applied Research, the specific problem is narrower in scope and labeled similarly: The specific problem to be addressed is… Applied Research Problems include 3 components: A general problem sentence, 3 – 4 supporting sentences showing that the problem exists within the literature, and a specific problem sentence.

Supporting Sentences

All problem statements should include supporting information to assist in explaining the problem and must contain at least three scholarly resources to substantiate the problem. Scholarly resources should be published within the last three to five years. Proper APA formatting should be used, including a title and reference page.[supanova_question]

The previous writing was on order # 356182721 The goal of the assignment is to expand on your previous

The previous writing was on order # 356182721 The goal of the assignment is to expand on your previous

Write a Mock Epic story/poem. Follow MLA guidelines. There are no specific guidelines for length. You must have well-developed

Write a Mock Epic story/poem. Follow MLA guidelines. There are no specific guidelines for length. You must have well-developed. Write a Mock Epic story/poem. Follow MLA guidelines. There are no specific guidelines for length. You must have well-developed.

Write a Mock Epic story/poem. Follow MLA guidelines. There are no specific guidelines for length. You must have well-developed characters.You must use a lofty tone that mimics the mock-epic (it can be funny and make fun of the epic hero style).
You must include some kind of a “battle.”[supanova_question]

Develop your Financial Model for the next five years as follows:

Develop your Financial Model for the next five years as follows:
Project Name : Automobile Autonomous Windshield for non-self-driven vehicles
Provide your assumptions and descriptions on Sales Forecast, and complete the Sales Projections.
Provide your assumptions and descriptions on Cost Forecast, and complete the Cost Projections.
Follow the steps in Figure 17.2 and develop an income statement (or profit and loss statement) as in Table 17.4 for Five Years
Calculate ROI each period..
Also attached Reference document for different project.
[supanova_question]

Digital Signal Processing

Write a Mock Epic story/poem. Follow MLA guidelines. There are no specific guidelines for length. You must have well-developed Below figure shows the polyphase implementation of a filter bank.
Let the input signal be x(n) = [4, 6, 5, 2, 1, 3]. The lowpass filters are given by

The arrows indicate n = 0.
1 Find the coefficients of filters H1, F1 using alias cancellation conditions.
2 Find v0(n), v1(n), w0(n), w1(n), ?(?) in the polyphase implementation shown below.

done
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Architecture Question

i will need you to take a look at my PowerPoint and please help me to edit any thing grammar or a word chosen, as well as from that PowerPoint i will need you to write the essay report 4 pages. 2000 words is 4 pages single spaced, or 8 pages double spaced. There is no specific format required to offer you all stay creative and apply any format you are familiar with.

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CIS22C Heaps

Follow all code styling and submission instructions as outlined for previous labs.
Derive a MinHeap class from the BST class of your Lab 4 code.
Define/Override only the Search/Insert/Delete methods in the new class.
Write a new main for this lab which:Will only be a test program for the MinHeap.
Declares and creates a MinHeap object as necessary.
Declares and creates the Dollar objects as necessary.
Inserts the 20 Dollar objects specified in Lab 4 in the same order.
Performs all 4 traversals after the inserting the 10th and the last objects – in total there will be 8 outputs which should be clearly demarcated.
No user input is necessary, no data validation is necessary.

For submission – upload all class files from Lab 4 as necessary as well as your new MinHeap class and the main. Remember to also include adequate number of screenshots of the program execution.
The Discussion forum will be monitored and responded to all week during the Finals. Office Hours will only be held on MTW. For clarifications, post your questions on the Discussion forum first.
Grading:
Since this is an extra credit lab designed to boost your overall lab score (programming labs zybooks labs), this lab has been made optional and the following criteria will be applied:
10 pts – EXE created from your code works from command line.
30 pts – MinHeap ADT
10 pts – Your main
The following additional early submission extra credit can be earned:20% extra if submitted one day early (i.e. EOD Thursday).
36% extra if submitted two days early (i.e. EOD Wednesday).
44% extra if submitted three days early (i.e. EOD Tuesday – remember the final is on Tuesday).
50% extra if submitted four days early (i.e. EOD Monday).

The early submission extra credits will only be applied if both these conditions are met;Your score on the lab without the extra credit is at least 40.
Your cumulative score on the five past programming labs is less than 550 points.
Thus, the first 50 points is a true extra credit but the additional early submission extra credit is only a make up for past lost points.

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Statistics Question

Assignment part 1
1.Please show and explain how are you going to define and etc.and what chapters will you be using for each stage and while explainig you can use graphs from excel or minitab as it’s shown in the chapters.you should use all the chapters.
a.define
b. measure
c…..
,d,…..
,e….
Assignment part 2
create a narrative of what did you find out and the results in bullet points.
I will send you the lectures once you accept my assignment.
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Make an E-Poster! All info provided

Hello, I need help making an E poster. We have already answered the questions and done the research of info to go on poster (attached below). This is the content that needs to go in the poster:
Assessment: Review the literature on your selected topic. (What does the literature show as interventions, etc.?)
Windshield survey
Interviews with key informants (if available)
Gather population data: Epidemiological dataCensus statistics
Morbidity / mortality
Cultural diversity / ethnicity
Beliefs
Housing

Transportation
EconomicsProtective systems (police/fire/ambulance/court)
Food supply systems
Educational systems
Communication systems
Health systems
Political systems
Environmental systemsIndustry
Water
Air
Waste management
Energy

Analyze DataWhat is good; what needs change?
Where are interventions needed?
What are the nursing diagnoses?
What are your goal(s)?

Goal Planning:List goals with identified intervention.
Go into the research and see what has been done before, what validates your findings, and what nursing has accomplished.

Create/Identify interventions:Primary
Secondary
Tertiary

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1 BP Research Paper part 1 The problem in this paper is

1

BP Research Paper part 1

The problem in this paper is that the Deepwater Horizon oil drilling rig erupted in Mexico at the Gulf Coast in April 2010, killing 11 employees and producing the world’s biggest maritime oil leak. It also had devastating ecological and financial consequences, such as fish and animal fatalities and diminished coastal visitation. The catastrophe began with a “bore structural breakdown,” as per BP’s September 2010 study (Harlow et al., 2011). This was accompanied by a disconnection over the well’s hydrostatic flow. The “blowout preventer,” which was required to seal the well immediately in case of losing control, was not activated. Hydrocarbons flowed uncontrollably up the well exploded, resulting in a sequence of blasts on the site. In their communication, BP placed most of its blame on Halliburton and Transocean in their study, although its conclusions were highly criticized since most of the evidence led back to them.

To repair its reputation, The Justice Department and Gulf coast states negotiated a $20 billion legal settlement with BP in 2015, which included penalties to settle the issue.  BP remains a lightning rod for people who object to the oil and gas sector on ecological, societal, and ethical grounds, despite its best efforts to restore its reputation during its worst hour in its 100-year existence (Cornwall, 2015). However, the firm continues to release its corporate governance statements and remains consistent with its messaging. Regardless, BP will keep working hard to convince critics that it is a really committed business leader until all lawsuits are concluded. The Gulf of Mexico is certified clear of any pollution from the Deepwater Horizon catastrophe, whether deserved or not.

References

Cornwall, W. (2015). Deepwater Horizon: after the oil.

Harlow, W. F., Brantley, B. C., & Harlow, R. M. (2011). BP initial image repair strategies after the Deepwater Horizon spill. Public Relations Review, 37(1), 80-83.[supanova_question]

BENCHMARKING SIGNIFICANCE 2 Benchmarking Significance Sarai Cortes SNHU August 1, 2021 Benchmarking

BENCHMARKING SIGNIFICANCE 2

Benchmarking Significance

Sarai Cortes

SNHU

August 1, 2021

Benchmarking Significance

Analyzing an organization’s financial statements is essential in tracking growth and progress in various respects. However, in addition to the analysis of financial statements, benchmarking is commonly used to establish standards by comparing financial data to derive a specified range of performance. During benchmarking, the initial step is to determine whether the data used for analysis is appropriately analyzable in terms of respective measurements. Moreover, the anticipated outcome is determining the weighted performance level of an organization relative to similar entities of the market.

The size of any business is usually stated in terms of market share, annual revenue, or total assets. Consequently, analysis and benchmarking of financial statements is the best way to determine whether the business trend is expanding or contracting. More importantly, benchmarking assist an organization to keep track of their main competitors and formulate novel strategies to achieve competitive advantage. Determining the growth of a business through benchmarking also significantly enhances the organization’s decision-making process and management style adoptions.

The overall performance of an organization can also be determined through the analysis of its liquidity and profitability. The working capital of an organization can be used to determine whether the total assets would be sufficient to cover existing liabilities. For instance, it would be prudent for an organization to determine whether the most liquid assets such as cash and expected receivables are enough to cover expenses such as assets, loans, and other payables in a specified duration. Additionally, determining whether a company is making enough profit in its operations can be determined through financial benchmarking. Public companies are more interested in the earnings per share, while small ones focus on evaluating taxes, interests, and depreciation. The EBITDA ratios are extremely beneficial in comparing organizations with disparities in tax strategies, business models, and structures.

Factual Analysis

Table 1 Cash flow analysis Source: (SEC.gov | HOME. (2021)

Target

Walmart

In thousands

2021

2020

2019

2021

2020

2019

Cash from Operations

10525000

7117000

5973000

36074000

25255000

27753000

Cash from Investing

-2591000

-2944000

-3416000

-10071000

-9128000

-2.4E+07

Cash from Financing

-2000000

-3152000

-3644000

-16117000

-14299000

-2537000

Capital Expenditures

-2649000

-3027000

-3516000

10264000

10705000

10344000

Figure 1 Cash flow analysis Source: (SEC.gov | HOME. (2021)

Cash flow reports are especially imperative in the determination of a company’s growth. According to the analysis performed in this report, it is evident that money from different sources contribute towards the final outcome of a company’s financial definition. From the analysis, it is apparent that Target and Walmart operate in the same economic constraints. The cash flow analysis of the two companies reveals that Target has a smaller market share compared to Walmart and thus has lower values in its financial statement. However, it should be noted that lowered values in the financial statements do not necessarily indicate poor performance. Target is not in economic turmoil, as illustrated by leading entities in the market data because its financial extrapolation data is similar to other business entities. However, Target has the potential to do better and increase the sales rate and general realized average revenue.

Factual Analysis

` Table 2 Balance Sheet Analysis Source: (SEC.gov | HOME. (2021)

Target

Walmart

2021

2020

2019

2021

2020

2019

Total Assets

51248000

42779000

41290000

252496000

236495000

219295000

Current Assets

20756000

12902000

12519000

90067000

61806000

61897000

Total Liabilities

36808000

30946000

29993000

171571000

161826000

146799000

Long Term Debt

11536000

11338000

10223000

45041000

48021000

50203000

Stockholders’ Equity

11440000

11833000

11297000

80925000

74669000

72496000

Current Liabilities

20125000

14487000

15014000

92645000

77790000

77477000

Figure 2 Balance Sheet Analysis Source: (SEC.gov | HOME. (2021)

The total revenue recorded by Walmart is way higher than that of Target. The same is evident for EBITDA, operating income, and net income for a period of the last three years. The results of the analysis are clearly illustrated in figure 2 above. In benchmarking analysis, it would appear that Target has lots of milestones to overcome before reaching a position where they would be in direct competitiveness with Walmart

Table 3 Income Statement Analysis Source: (SEC.gov | HOME. (2021)

Target

Walmart

2021

2020

2019

2021

2020

2019

Total Revenue

93561000

78112000

75356000

559151000

523964000

514405000

EBITDA

9024000

7262000

6584000

33958000

33526000

24289000

Operating Income

6539000

4658000

4110000

22548000

20568000

21957000

Net Income

4368000

3281000

2934000

13510000

14881000

6670000

Figure 3 Income statement analysis Source: (SEC.gov | HOME. (2021)

As indicated by figure 3 and table 3 above, the income statement analysis indicates that Walmart is doing way much better than target in terms of profitability, growth, liquidity, and turnover. Therefore, such an analysis could assist Target in developing strategies for acquiring similar statistics with Walmart to grow themselves. Moreover, the best way to succeed is to become better and efficient compared to your adversaries.

Communication to stakeholders

Stakeholders are the people who are fundamental to the existence and development of an organization. Communication to stakeholders about the progress of a company through the display of financial statements prompts numerous investors in determining the most lucrative ventures. Consequently, the choice for Walmart to publish their financial statements could be the primary reason why numerous people invest their money in the company. Moreover, several investments translate to the growth of companies.

Reference

SEC.gov | HOME. (2021). Retrieved 1 August 2021, from https://www.sec.gov/[supanova_question]

Benchmark Essay Assignment Instructions Overview The essay assignments below will allow you

Benchmark Essay Assignment Instructions

Overview

The essay assignments below will allow you to further explore concepts that are related to trauma, development, and spirituality as well as addiction in adolescence.

You will research the effects of trauma on life development. You will discuss trauma and resilience, how trauma affects development, and what might be the determining factors that lead to developmental delays when a child is exposed to trauma. You will also explore what research says about spiritual development’s effect on resilience and countering the effects of trauma.

You will also discuss what the current research is saying regarding addiction/abuse, resilience in this population, and what interventions may counteract abuse of substances and addictions in this population.

Instructions

In Module 3: Week 3 and Module 5: Week 5, you will write an essay drawing information from this course, scholarly articles, outside readings, and presentations for that Module: Week.

The essays should be between 500 – 600 words.

Excluding the title page and reference page

Please utilize current APA formatting.

The essay must be strongly supported with 2–3 scholarly references (including the required textbook).

References must be less than 10 years old

Trauma, Development, and Spirituality Essay (Module 3: Week 3)

Discuss trauma and resilience, how trauma affects development, and what might be the determining factors that lead to developmental delays when a child is exposed to trauma. What is research saying about trauma and resilience, and spiritual development and how it can counter the effects of trauma? Analyze the research and critically discuss the viewpoints. Ensure that the conclusion contains a good summary of the issues treated and offers suggestions for further study.

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10 Benchmark Essay: Trauma, Development and Spirituality Department of Behavioral Science September

10

Benchmark Essay: Trauma, Development and Spirituality

Department of Behavioral Science

September 12,2021

Children are often faced with many challenges beyond their control, from family barriers like alcoholism, abuse, divorce, and poverty to unpredicted difficulties such as natural disasters, medical illness, death, and traumatic events. Children who can manage their emotions despite these disturbing experiences have often endured misfortune and are viewed as stress-resistant or resilient (Wong et al.,2020). Personally speaking, from my experience as a behavioral technician, it is not unusual for children to display the effects of trauma behaviorally by disagreement with peers, personality regression, or withdrawal, academically through lower grades, disinterest in school, or truancy. Some of my patients who exhibited symptoms while working at a mental hospital were self-harm, weight fluctuation, and hygienic regression. Emotionally, my patients show anger or frustration. Therefore, counselors in training like myself need to be aware of environmental factors that put children at risk and protective factors that can be encouraged to reinforce resilience.

According to the American Psychological Association, “resilience is the process of adapting well when confronted by adversity, tragedy, significant stressors, and trauma (APA,2019). This definition implies that life is far from perfect. Everyone will experience twists and turns from everyday obstacles to traumatic effects such as losing a loved one, a life-changing event, or a severe illness. Each change affects everyone differently in which brings a feeling of strong emotions and uncertainty. Despite all these life-changing situations, people are generally able to transition in part due to resilience.

Protective factors can adjust a person’s response to an environmental threat (Wong et al.,2020). They can start internally within the child, such as their intelligence, and control their behavior. At the same time, others are based on external influences such as competent parents, successful schooling, and access to support networks. In other words, while some cognitive factors may serve as protective factors, some children may be too young developmentally to use them (Wong et al.,2020). Additionally, depending on the culture, it is not uncommon for some children to see resilience in faith and spirituality as a vital protective factor. For some, it may not be of great value (Wong et al.,2020). Children can learn protective factors such as resiliency, so counselors need to know which factors promote resiliency. Alvord and Grados(2005) identified six factors: proactive orientation, self-regulation, proactive parenting, connections and attachments, school achievement and involvement, IQ, unique talents, and community. The main characteristic of resiliency is a proactive orientation or the capacity to take the initiative in life and believe in your effectiveness.

Protective factors such as positive self-efficacy and self-esteem, joyous expectation of the future, good coping strategies, self-discipline, critical thinking abilities, initiative, positive thinking, and internal motivation contribute to a child’s resilience (Wong et al.,2020). Preschool children who display determination and a positive outlook on life typically have a proactive orientation. Self-control, for instance, having control over behavior and emotions, is also one of the most crucial protective factors for developing resilience (Wong et al.,2020). Eventually, resilient preschool children should have a better grasp of self-control. Furthermore, children with parents that practice authoritative parenting exemplify more resilience. Authoritative parents are nurturing, responsive and supportive but still have clear expectations for their children (Wong et al.,2020). They provide caring and loving support, opportunities for thinking/ questioning, and logical, stable rules and expectations of their children’s behavior. In other words, authoritative parents strive to manage their child’s behavior by explaining rules, considering the child’s point of view, and reasoning. Outside of family dynamics, forming relationships and getting along with peers is a clear indication for forming connections. Although this may be true, children still need to be active in creating and sustaining supportive relationships (Wong et al.,2020).

To put it another way, children need to learn the skills necessary to sustain these relationships. Counselors and parents can encourage children to learn positive communication skills and then observe their play collectively to determine if they can apply what they have learned.

Active participation in school and after-school activities and problem-solving abilities is also in connection with resiliency in children. Children who share and are cooperative with social norms and have positive interactions with peers are more than likely to do this task. Another critical point is that parents and teachers should highlight children’s competence areas to reinforce a sense of achievement (Wong et al.,2020). For example, parents and teachers should praise when a preschooler successfully learns their letters and numbers. Moreover, parents should encourage and support when a child has learned how to climb the jungle gym at the playground.

On the other hand, when a child is not successful in climbing the jungle gym, they should not be discouraged by their family. Ultimately, having a positive role model outside of the family and recreational activities/ programs, safe neighborhoods have also related to having a positive influence on the child (Wong et al.,2020). Enrolling a child in a healthy preschool environment or placing the child in a swim team with a good, supportive coach can increase resiliency.

Growing up is problematic in and of itself, but it is especially challenging for those who have experienced childhood trauma due to abuse or neglect. One may ask how these children cope with the hardships that life has dealt them, could it be their perception of life, support system, or spirituality, or is it denial. Regardless of the method, one chooses to cope with, navigating through life’s misfortunes is a challenging endeavor. Becoming an adult through these obstacles is not an easy task. This article touches on resilience, spirituality, and adult childhood trauma survivors. Rodriquez and Henderson (2010) investigate the connection between parent religion and child abuse risk. They Believed that parents’ excessive devotion to religion was directly associated with notions of authority, which better identified as child abuse. Rodriquez and Henderson studied 207 Christians who went to church regularly to discover the link between discipline and abuse and how it impacts behavior.

Prior research affirms religious beliefs that recommend corporal punishment, highlighting spiritual support and beliefs that place the child’s responsibility to obey parental authority found to affect parental child abuse. Rodriquez and Henderson (2010, p 90) concluded that the more extensive the church attendance predicted to relate abuse potential based on the Child Abuse Potential Inventory. Additionally, contributors who explained the bible word for word scored at high risk of child abuse potential. The elevated scores could be related to interpretations of bible scripture deemed to motivate a disciplinary stance regarding sinners and bring about more authoritative parenting styles that highlight child compliance and the use of corporal punishment (2010, p 90). While Rodriquez and Henderson point to a correlation between religious believers, their research limited how religion contributed to parental attitudes. The assessments used to link religion to social conformity and child abuse their study does not aid in religious differences within religious backgrounds that notably influence the believer’s behavior. Their work did not begin from a theological standpoint. It ignores theological contributions in its data. Nevertheless, their work helps interpret the complications of the child abuse problem and theological counselors.

Spiritual beliefs play an essential role in making sense of life events and coping with difficult situations. Connecting positive associations with suffering helps childhood survivors get through reoccurring stressors. Werner and Smith’s (1982) research focused on people born in at-risk environments from birth to adulthood. Their study indicated that the people who became adjusted intellectually and interpersonally identified religiously as a significant protector factor in their resilience. While not declared a pivotal factor in resilience, religion is designated as a protective factor in positive adjustment following unpleasant adolescent events. Additionally, the participants believed that their faith was a proceeding factor when the odds were against them and that it could be overcome (Werner & Smith, 1992, p. 177). Since their work, resilience research has moved to shed light on the roles of protective factors.

Pargament’s research (1997) has been extensively influential in interpreting how certain sacred factors such as religious coping skills have been found to foretell adaptation more so than non-religious coping skills. His work focuses on the connection between coping and acute stress reaction. Pargament’s claimed that religion could play a part in each domain of coping plus contribute to the coping process and exists because of the coping process (Pargament et al., 1990). Pargament (1997) discussed two forms of religious coping, helpful and harmful. He believed that helpful and harmful religious coping connected to positive and negative stress adjustment outcomes. From Pargament point of view, spiritual coping included emotional comfort, a good spiritual connection, guidance in critical thinking, support from the church, and being by kindhearted religious reframing. Consequently, positive religious coping is seen here as having a secure relationship with God, having a relationship with God and others, and having an individualized sense of meaning.

However, his work observed harmful spiritual relationships as having anger or disappointment with God or God involvement in traumatic experiences. Pargament indicated that disappointment with one religious community or negative reevaluations about God’s punishment is signs of negative coping. From his point of view, when having an insecure relationship with God through the experiences of anger, discontent, and doubt (Gall,2006). Overall, the Pargaments study is limited because it only highlights positive or negative views of God. Some could argue that it ignores the other aspects of a healthy spirituality following trauma (suffering). As previously mentioned, childhood abuse often leads children broken due to unpleasant events. A child’s spiritual relationship becomes broken after the abuse or neglect. An individual spiritual identity revolves around having a sense of purpose in the world, and their imagination and creativity emerge from within their spirit (Lyon,2010). Childhood abuse leaves the child feeling wounded and vulnerable abuse damages a child’s ability to trust and depend on others (Lyon,2010).

The loss of free will changes their spiritual relationship between surviving and God (Lyon,2010). These survivors often have internalized feelings of being unworthy, unloved, and unprotected and being judged by others, which creates a disconnection between survivors and God (Lyon,2010). A relationship with God provides a spiritual outlet to explore the process of reconnecting for survivors. Pastoral counseling gives children the ability to explore the meaning of theological constructs in ways that challenge their negative thought patterns and supports the connectedness with God and others (Lyon,2010). Lyon mentions three valuable theological contributions with childhood abuse survivors first, repair the survivors inner feeling of shame and injustice, second replace the conceptional and creative capacities of the self and third bring to life the imaginative qualities of the soul that can guide the survivor to spiritual,

Pastoral counseling allows survivors to express their sorrows without being ashamed of their suffering (Glenn,2014). Grief reminds us that the deepest despair is part of life and part of the life of our Lord, whom we turn to for help (Glenn,2014). Survivors of abuse and neglect could rebuild their relationship with the community and with God through reparative pastoral counseling (Glenn,2014). Theology also gives survivors spiritual experience as they try to understand their world and come to terms with who they are as individuals. This article touched on various topics such as spirituality, trauma, and resilience related to the counseling profession. The adults with a history of childhood trauma identify their resilience, understand their spirituality and resilience, and how the interpretation of that resilience will influence their caregiving. This study also laid down the groundwork for future research to build knowledge in clinical practice and education. In counseling, having a deep relationship with God or a belief in a higher purpose is essential because it gives those individuals who have endured abuse or neglect a sense of belongingness.

Counseling can help children to recognize how valuable it’s to have a sense of self and a relationship with the Lord. Counselors can also advocate for awareness of spiritual identity, which entails reflecting on the role spirituality has in his or her life. This self-reflection may or may not include a religious identity, but the process of trying to find meaning could have some religious beliefs, behaviors, and values. Helping childhood trauma survivors connect to find meaningfulness in their lives through spiritual identity can enhance lifelong resilience.

References

American Psychological Association. (2019). The road to resilience. Retrieved from https://www.apa.org/helpcenter/road-resilience

Alvord, M. K., & Grados, J. J. (2005). Enhancing resilience in children: A proactive approach. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 36(3), 238–245. https://doi.org/10.1037/0735-7028.36.3.238

Glenn, C. T. B. (2014). A bridge over troubled waters: Spirituality and resilience with emerging adult childhood trauma survivors. Journal of Spirituality in Mental Health, 16(1), 37–50. https://doi.org/10.1080/19349637.2014.864543

Kathleen Brewer-Smyth & Harold G. Koenig (2014) Could Spirituality and Religion Promote Stress Resilience in Survivors of Childhood Trauma?, Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 35:4, 251-256, DOI: 10.3109/01612840.2013.873101

Lyon, E. (2010). Spiritual implications of interpersonal abuse: Speaking of the soul. Pastoral Psychology, 59, 233–247. doi:10.1007/s11089-009-0238-2

Wong D. W., Hall K. R., & Hernandez L. W. (2020). Counseling Individuals Through the Lifespan. [MBS Direct]. Retrieved from https://mbsdirect.vitalsource.com/#/books/9781544343235/

(Wong et al.,2020)[supanova_question]

Write a Mock Epic story/poem. Follow MLA guidelines. There are no specific guidelines for length. You must have well-developed

Write a Mock Epic story/poem. Follow MLA guidelines. There are no specific guidelines for length. You must have well-developed