Homework Help

Homework Help. Homework Help.

NO EXCEL FILE. SHOW YOUR WORK/STEPSQuestion 3 In a study conducted by American Express, corporate clients were surveyed to determine the extent to which hotel room rates quoted by central reservation systems differ from the rates negotiated by the companies.The study found that the mean overcharge by hotels was $11.35 per night.Suppose a follow-up study was done in which a random sample of 30 corporate hotel bookings was analyzed. Only those cases where an error occurred were included in the study.The following data show the amounts by which the quoted rate differs from the negotiated rate. Positive values indicate an overcharge and negative values indicate an undercharge.

Compute a 95% confidence interval estimate for the mean error in hotel charges. Interpret the confidence interval estimate.
Based on the interval computed in apart a, do these sample data tend to support the results of the America Express study? Explain.

Question 4 The director of state agency believes that the average starting salary for clerical employees in the state is less than $30,000 per year. To test her hypothesis, she has collected a simple random sample of 100 starting clerical salaries from across the state and found that the sample mean is $29,750.
State the appropriate null and alternative hypotheses.
Assuming the population standard deviation is known to be $2,500 and the significance level for the test is to be 0.05, what is the critical value
Referring to your answer in part b, what conclusion should be reached with respect to the null hypothesis?
Referring to your answer in part c, which of the two statistical errors might have been made in this case? Explain.

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Personal budget Planning Project

The objective of this project is for you to set up a budget that would allow you to live the type of life you would like. This project dose involves doing some calculations and setting up a budget on Excel, but its main purpose is to allow you to have some fun dreaming of the future while realizing what these dreams may cost.
Whether you’re looking to create a personal budget spreadsheet or just get a better grasp on money management, start with these six steps.
Even if you don’t use a budget spreadsheet, you probably need some way of determining where your money is going each month. Creating a budget with a template can help you feel more in control of your finances and let you save money for your goals. The trick is to figure out a way to track your finances that works for you. The following steps can help you create a budget.
Step 1: Note your net income
The first step in creating a budget is to identify the amount of money you have coming in. Keep in mind, however, that it’s easy to overestimate what you can afford if you think of your total salary as what you have to spend.
Tip: If you have a hobby or a talent, you may be able to find a way to supplement your income. Having an extra source of income (Links to an external site.) can also be helpful if you ever lose your job.
Step 2: Track your spendingIt’s helpful to keep track of and categorize your spending so you know where you can make adjustments. Doing so will help you identify what you are spending the most money on and where it might be easiest to cut back.
Begin by listing all your fixed expenses. These are regular monthly bills such as rent or mortgage, utilities or car payments. It’s unlikely you’ll be able to cut back on these but knowing how much of your monthly income they take up can be helpful.
Next list all your variable expenses—those that may change from month to month such as groceries, gas and entertainment. This is an area where you might find opportunities to cut back. Credit card and bank statements are a good place to start since they often itemize or categorize your monthly expenditures.
Tip: Record your daily spending with anything that’s handy—a pen and paper, an app or your smartphone. You can use this spending and budgeting tool (Links to an external site.) if you have a bank account.
Step 3: Set your goalsBefore you start sifting through the information you’ve tracked, make a list of all the financial goals you want to accomplish in the short-and long-term. Short-term goals should take no longer than a year to achieve. Long-term goals, such as saving for retirement or your child’s education, may take years to reach. Remember, your goals don’t have to be set in stone, but identifying your priorities before you start planning a budget will help. For example, it may be easier to cut spending if you know your short-term goal is to reduce credit card debt.
Step 4: Make a planUse the variable and fixed expenses you compiled to help you get a sense of what you’ll spend in the coming months. With your fixed expenses, you can predict fairly accurately how much you’ll have to budget for. Use your past spending habits as a guide when trying to predict your variable expenses.
You might choose to break down your expenses even further, between things you need to have and things you want to have. For instance, if you drive to work every day, gasoline probably counts as a need. A monthly music subscription, however, may count as a want. This difference becomes important when it’s time to make adjustments.
Step 5: Adjust your habits if necessaryOnce you’ve done all this, you have what you need to complete your budget. Having documented your income and spending, you can start to see where you have money left over or where you can cut back so that you have money to put toward your goals.
Want-to-have expenses are the first area to look for spending cuts. Can you skip movie night in favor of a movie at home? Try adjusting the numbers you’ve tracked to see how much money that frees up. If you’ve already adjusted your spending on wants, evaluate your spending (Links to an external site.) on needs. You may need internet at home, but do you need the fastest available?
Lastly, if the numbers still aren’t adding up, you can look at adjusting your fixed expenses. Doing so will be much more difficult and require greater discipline, but on close inspection a “need” may just be a “hard to part with.” Such decisions come with big trade-offs, so make sure you carefully weigh your options.
Tip: Small savings (Links to an external site.) can add up to a lot of money, so don’t overlook the little stuff. You might be surprised at how much extra money you accumulate by making one minor adjustment at a time.
Step 6: Keep checking inIt’s important that you review your budget on a regular basis to be sure you are staying on track. You can also compare your monthly expenses (Links to an external site.) to those of people similar to you. Few elements of your budget are set in stone: You may get a raise; your expenses may increase, or you may have reached your goal and want to plan for a new one. Whatever the reason, keep checking in with your budget following the steps above.
Your final take-home pay is called net income, and that is the number you should use when creating a budget.
Now it is time to set up your budget. This will entail the following steps:
Some budget experts recommend that different percentages of your income should be used towards your expenses: Use the following recommendations to complete your budget expense.
Housing: 28%
Automobile: 12%
Utilities: 5%
Taxes: 16%
Food: 18%
Savings: 5%
Entertainment: 5%
Misc./Other: 11%
The Task
Now that you are ready to jump into the working world, your job is to create a personal budget from scratch. Do not assume that you have anything! You must buy a car and if you are planning on going to 4-year college, you will have student loans (in other words, don’t assume your parents have given you anything). Based on a take home amount of$24,000 (figure taxes have already been deducted from approximately a $30,000 salary) a year, create a budget spreadsheet in Excel. The areas that you must include are as follows:
FIXED EXPENSES
Rent/Mortgage (payment per month)
Renters Insurance (payment per month)
Automobile (monthly payment)
Auto Insurance (monthly payment)
Health insurance (monthly payment)
Credit Card
Student loans (monthly payment if applicable)
Long Term Savings
Emergency
VARIABLE EXPENSES
Food (groceries, restaurants, snacks)
phone
cell phone
electricity
clothing
entertainment (movies, video rental, sporting events)
haircuts
vacations
gas (car)
cable tv While gathering information,

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11 mins ago[supanova_question]

Homework Help

Homework Help Mathematics Assignment Help NO EXCEL FILE. SHOW YOUR WORK/STEPSQuestion 3 In a study conducted by American Express, corporate clients were surveyed to determine the extent to which hotel room rates quoted by central reservation systems differ from the rates negotiated by the companies.The study found that the mean overcharge by hotels was $11.35 per night.Suppose a follow-up study was done in which a random sample of 30 corporate hotel bookings was analyzed. Only those cases where an error occurred were included in the study.The following data show the amounts by which the quoted rate differs from the negotiated rate. Positive values indicate an overcharge and negative values indicate an undercharge.
$15.45
$24.81
$6.02
$14.00
$25.60
$8.29
-$17.34
-$5.72
$11.61
$3.48
$18.91
$7.14
$6.64
$12.48
$6.31
-$4.85
$5.72
$12.72
$5.23
$4.57
$15.84
$2.09
-$4.56
$3.00
$23.60
$30.86
$9.25
$0.93
$20.73
$12.45
Compute a 95% confidence interval estimate for the mean error in hotel charges. Interpret the confidence interval estimate.
Based on the interval computed in apart a, do these sample data tend to support the results of the America Express study? Explain.

Question 4 The director of state agency believes that the average starting salary for clerical employees in the state is less than $30,000 per year. To test her hypothesis, she has collected a simple random sample of 100 starting clerical salaries from across the state and found that the sample mean is $29,750.
State the appropriate null and alternative hypotheses.
Assuming the population standard deviation is known to be $2,500 and the significance level for the test is to be 0.05, what is the critical value
Referring to your answer in part b, what conclusion should be reached with respect to the null hypothesis?
Referring to your answer in part c, which of the two statistical errors might have been made in this case? Explain.

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2 mins ago[supanova_question]

Personal budget Planning Project

The objective of this project is for you to set up a budget that would allow you to live the type of life you would like. This project dose involves doing some calculations and setting up a budget on Excel, but its main purpose is to allow you to have some fun dreaming of the future while realizing what these dreams may cost.
Whether you’re looking to create a personal budget spreadsheet or just get a better grasp on money management, start with these six steps.
Even if you don’t use a budget spreadsheet, you probably need some way of determining where your money is going each month. Creating a budget with a template can help you feel more in control of your finances and let you save money for your goals. The trick is to figure out a way to track your finances that works for you. The following steps can help you create a budget.
Step 1: Note your net income
The first step in creating a budget is to identify the amount of money you have coming in. Keep in mind, however, that it’s easy to overestimate what you can afford if you think of your total salary as what you have to spend.
Tip: If you have a hobby or a talent, you may be able to find a way to supplement your income. Having an extra source of income (Links to an external site.) can also be helpful if you ever lose your job.
Step 2: Track your spendingIt’s helpful to keep track of and categorize your spending so you know where you can make adjustments. Doing so will help you identify what you are spending the most money on and where it might be easiest to cut back.
Begin by listing all your fixed expenses. These are regular monthly bills such as rent or mortgage, utilities or car payments. It’s unlikely you’ll be able to cut back on these but knowing how much of your monthly income they take up can be helpful.
Next list all your variable expenses—those that may change from month to month such as groceries, gas and entertainment. This is an area where you might find opportunities to cut back. Credit card and bank statements are a good place to start since they often itemize or categorize your monthly expenditures.
Tip: Record your daily spending with anything that’s handy—a pen and paper, an app or your smartphone. You can use this spending and budgeting tool (Links to an external site.) if you have a bank account.
Step 3: Set your goalsBefore you start sifting through the information you’ve tracked, make a list of all the financial goals you want to accomplish in the short-and long-term. Short-term goals should take no longer than a year to achieve. Long-term goals, such as saving for retirement or your child’s education, may take years to reach. Remember, your goals don’t have to be set in stone, but identifying your priorities before you start planning a budget will help. For example, it may be easier to cut spending if you know your short-term goal is to reduce credit card debt.
Step 4: Make a planUse the variable and fixed expenses you compiled to help you get a sense of what you’ll spend in the coming months. With your fixed expenses, you can predict fairly accurately how much you’ll have to budget for. Use your past spending habits as a guide when trying to predict your variable expenses.
You might choose to break down your expenses even further, between things you need to have and things you want to have. For instance, if you drive to work every day, gasoline probably counts as a need. A monthly music subscription, however, may count as a want. This difference becomes important when it’s time to make adjustments.
Step 5: Adjust your habits if necessaryOnce you’ve done all this, you have what you need to complete your budget. Having documented your income and spending, you can start to see where you have money left over or where you can cut back so that you have money to put toward your goals.
Want-to-have expenses are the first area to look for spending cuts. Can you skip movie night in favor of a movie at home? Try adjusting the numbers you’ve tracked to see how much money that frees up. If you’ve already adjusted your spending on wants, evaluate your spending (Links to an external site.) on needs. You may need internet at home, but do you need the fastest available?
Lastly, if the numbers still aren’t adding up, you can look at adjusting your fixed expenses. Doing so will be much more difficult and require greater discipline, but on close inspection a “need” may just be a “hard to part with.” Such decisions come with big trade-offs, so make sure you carefully weigh your options.
Tip: Small savings (Links to an external site.) can add up to a lot of money, so don’t overlook the little stuff. You might be surprised at how much extra money you accumulate by making one minor adjustment at a time.
Step 6: Keep checking inIt’s important that you review your budget on a regular basis to be sure you are staying on track. You can also compare your monthly expenses (Links to an external site.) to those of people similar to you. Few elements of your budget are set in stone: You may get a raise; your expenses may increase, or you may have reached your goal and want to plan for a new one. Whatever the reason, keep checking in with your budget following the steps above.
Your final take-home pay is called net income, and that is the number you should use when creating a budget.
Now it is time to set up your budget. This will entail the following steps:
Some budget experts recommend that different percentages of your income should be used towards your expenses: Use the following recommendations to complete your budget expense.
Housing: 28%
Automobile: 12%
Utilities: 5%
Taxes: 16%
Food: 18%
Savings: 5%
Entertainment: 5%
Misc./Other: 11%
The Task
Now that you are ready to jump into the working world, your job is to create a personal budget from scratch. Do not assume that you have anything! You must buy a car and if you are planning on going to 4-year college, you will have student loans (in other words, don’t assume your parents have given you anything). Based on a take home amount of$24,000 (figure taxes have already been deducted from approximately a $30,000 salary) a year, create a budget spreadsheet in Excel. The areas that you must include are as follows:
FIXED EXPENSES
Rent/Mortgage (payment per month)
Renters Insurance (payment per month)
Automobile (monthly payment)
Auto Insurance (monthly payment)
Health insurance (monthly payment)
Credit Card
Student loans (monthly payment if applicable)
Long Term Savings
Emergency
VARIABLE EXPENSES
Food (groceries, restaurants, snacks)
phone
cell phone
electricity
clothing
entertainment (movies, video rental, sporting events)
haircuts
vacations
gas (car)
cable tv While gathering information,

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8 mins ago[supanova_question]

Homework Help

Homework Help

Mathematics Question

Mathematics Question. Mathematics Question.

Due: NOV 21
Please see the file first, make sure you can solve them and finish them on time.
I need a B for this work.
I will provide notes and textbook after I confirm you
I will send you a message before I confirm you, please check it.
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Applied Mathematics Question

I have a test of complex analysis after 13 hrs. The test is about 2 hrs(120min) long which will consist of 11-12 MCQ with single and multi correct answers and 2-3 subjective questions. The syllabus is attached please bid only after going through the syllabus and if you are confident enough to help me as this a very important test
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D/Monte Carlo Simulation

Mathematics Question discuss-boeri-et-al-solo-self-employment-and-alternative-work-arrangements-a-cross-country-perspective-on-the-changing-composition-of-jobsjournal-essay/”>Mathematics Assignment Help
Figure 1. Vegas Slot Machines (By Yamaguchi??, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=57295504 (Links to an external site.))
Introduction
For this lab, we’re going to use the Monte Carlo method to estimate the value of pi. Wikipedia has a pretty good definition of the Monte Carlo Method (Links to an external site.):
“Monte Carlo methods, or Monte Carlo experiments, are a broad class of computational (Links to an external site.) algorithms (Links to an external site.) that rely on repeated random sampling (Links to an external site.) to obtain numerical results. The underlying concept is to use randomness (Links to an external site.) to solve problems that might be deterministic (Links to an external site.) in principle. They are often used in physical (Links to an external site.) and mathematical (Links to an external site.) problems and are most useful when it is difficult or impossible to use other approaches. Monte Carlo methods are mainly used in three problem classes:[1] (Links to an external site.) optimization (Links to an external site.), numerical integration (Links to an external site.), and generating draws from a probability distribution (Links to an external site.).
In physics-related problems, Monte Carlo methods are useful for simulating systems with many coupled (Links to an external site.) degrees of freedom (Links to an external site.), such as fluids, disordered materials, strongly coupled solids, and cellular structures (see cellular Potts model (Links to an external site.), interacting particle systems (Links to an external site.), McKean–Vlasov processes (Links to an external site.), kinetic models of gases (Links to an external site.)).
Other examples include modeling phenomena with significant uncertainty (Links to an external site.) in inputs such as the calculation of risk (Links to an external site.) in business and, in mathematics, evaluation of multidimensional definite integrals (Links to an external site.) with complicated boundary conditions (Links to an external site.). In application to systems engineering problems (space, oil exploration (Links to an external site.), aircraft design, etc.), Monte Carlo–based predictions of failure, cost overruns (Links to an external site.) and schedule overruns are routinely better than human intuition or alternative “soft” methods.[2] (Links to an external site.)
Our task will be to apply this Monte Carlo method to numerically estimate the value of pi. The value of pi can be estimated numerically by comparing the area of a circle to the square in which it is inscribed.

Figure 2. Circle Inscribed in a Square
The reason why this works can be shown with some simple arithmetic:

Procedure
As usual, create a script, include a comment at the top explaining the purpose of the script, your name, and the date it was created.
1. Use the men function to ask the user how accurate they would like their estimate. Set the choices to .1, .01, and .001. Write a switch statement to set a variable tol to .1, .01 or .001 based on the user’s choice.
2. Write a separate function to perform the Monte Carlo simulation. Starting with n = 100, generate n random ordered pairs (x,y) between 0 and 1.
While the absolute value of the difference between your estimate and the true value of pi is less than or equal to your tolerance, perform the Monte Carlo simulation and report to the user how many iterations it took to achieve the desired accuracy.
3.
Turn-in Instructions
You will need to submit .m files for each function you define. Each .m file should include your name and function description in comments. Upload your files via Canvas. Let me know if you have any questions!

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9 mins ago[supanova_question]

MAT 230 ZyBooks Participation Activity 4.4.4

A box contains a total of five balls. The balls are numbered so they are distinct. Two of the balls are colored red and three of the balls are colored blue. The red balls are numbered 1 and 2, while the blue balls are numbered 3, 4, and 5. 2 balls are selected at random from the box. The order in which the balls are chosen does not matter but the numbers on the balls does matter. The diagram below shows three possible outcomes from the experiment. The outcome on the left and the outcome in the middle are considered the same. The outcome on the right is different than the other two. What is the expected number of red balls chosen?

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7 mins ago[supanova_question]

https://anyessayhelp.com/
Figure 1. Vegas Slot Machines (By Yamaguchi??, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=57295504 (Links to an external site.))
Introduction
For this lab, we’re going to use the Monte Carlo method to estimate the value of pi. Wikipedia has a pretty good definition of the Monte Carlo Method (Links to an external site.):
“Monte Carlo methods, or Monte Carlo experiments, are a broad class of computational (Links to an external site.) algorithms (Links to an external site.) that rely on repeated random sampling (Links to an external site.) to obtain numerical results. The underlying concept is to use randomness (Links to an external site.) to solve problems that might be deterministic (Links to an external site.) in principle. They are often used in physical (Links to an external site.) and mathematical (Links to an external site.) problems and are most useful when it is difficult or impossible to use other approaches. Monte Carlo methods are mainly used in three problem classes:[1] (Links to an external site.) optimization (Links to an external site.), numerical integration (Links to an external site.), and generating draws from a probability distribution (Links to an external site.).
In physics-related problems, Monte Carlo methods are useful for simulating systems with many coupled (Links to an external site.) degrees of freedom (Links to an external site.), such as fluids, disordered materials, strongly coupled solids, and cellular structures (see cellular Potts model (Links to an external site.), interacting particle systems (Links to an external site.), McKean–Vlasov processes (Links to an external site.), kinetic models of gases (Links to an external site.)).
Other examples include modeling phenomena with significant uncertainty (Links to an external site.) in inputs such as the calculation of risk (Links to an external site.) in business and, in mathematics, evaluation of multidimensional definite integrals (Links to an external site.) with complicated boundary conditions (Links to an external site.). In application to systems engineering problems (space, oil exploration (Links to an external site.), aircraft design, etc.), Monte Carlo–based predictions of failure, cost overruns (Links to an external site.) and schedule overruns are routinely better than human intuition or alternative “soft” methods.[2] (Links to an external site.)
Our task will be to apply this Monte Carlo method to numerically estimate the value of pi. The value of pi can be estimated numerically by comparing the area of a circle to the square in which it is inscribed.

Figure 2. Circle Inscribed in a Square
The reason why this works can be shown with some simple arithmetic:

Procedure
As usual, create a script, include a comment at the top explaining the purpose of the script, your name, and the date it was created.
1. Use the men function to ask the user how accurate they would like their estimate. Set the choices to .1, .01, and .001. Write a switch statement to set a variable tol to .1, .01 or .001 based on the user’s choice.
2. Write a separate function to perform the Monte Carlo simulation. Starting with n = 100, generate n random ordered pairs (x,y) between 0 and 1.
While the absolute value of the difference between your estimate and the true value of pi is less than or equal to your tolerance, perform the Monte Carlo simulation and report to the user how many iterations it took to achieve the desired accuracy.
3.
Turn-in Instructions
You will need to submit .m files for each function you define. Each .m file should include your name and function description in comments. Upload your files via Canvas. Let me know if you have any questions!

done
Seen
9 mins ago[supanova_question]