Descriiption: A Personal Philosophy of Nursing is an important piece of every nurse’s toolkit. This personal philosophy outlines the

Descriiption: A Personal Philosophy of Nursing is an important piece of every nurse’s toolkit. This personal philosophy outlines the. Descriiption: A Personal Philosophy of Nursing is an important piece of every nurse’s toolkit. This personal philosophy outlines the.

Descriiption:

A Personal Philosophy of Nursing is an important piece of every nurse’s toolkit. This personal philosophy outlines the foundation of your practice by defining the beliefs, values, and ethics you hold as a nurse.

Directions: Using your coursework and outside sources, use the following prompts to construct a 2-3 page personal philosophy of nursing.

Describe your personal definitions of the following concepts:

Health

Nursing

Recipient(s) of nursing care

Environment(s) of care

What values are most important to your practice of nursing and why?

Please follow the APA 7th edition guidelines and include a title page according to “student paper” instructions. For full credit, include two references/citations.

Assignment Submission:

The use of outside resources is required, and all papers must be cited and written in APA format.

Once you have completed the assignment, click the Submit Assignment option in the menu to the right and select a format for submitting your assignment.

Click the Submit Assignment button when you are ready.

My Nursing Philosophy

I became a nurse because I believe it was what I was destined to be. My mom told me when I was three years old that I told her I wanted to be a nurse. She died 3 days before my high school graduation but the night that she died she made me promise that I would finish school and I will. I started off as a CNA and moved up level by level. I went through a period of homeless and became passionate about helping the homeless population but then I figured out that a lot of the homeless population has a mental illness. So, my future is to become someone who fights for better laws and care for the mentally ill homeless population. My resilience, hardworking, dependable, caring, and bold personality make me a strong advocate.

My philosophy is ” Providing care with the knowledge to help my patients and advocate for their wellbeing every day.”

My personal nursing philosophy will benefit my career advancement by reminding me to be an advocate for my patients in and out of the hospital at the level I am now and in the future.

[supanova_question]

MM212 M4 College Algebra Part II Competency Assessment As the leader of

MM212 M4 College Algebra

Part II Competency Assessment

As the leader of a Secret Spy Team, you will pick the coding/decoding pair of functions from the list of functions below. The coding function will be used to encode your message so anyone outside your team cannot read it. (The receiving team member would decode the message with the decoding function.)

Coding Function

Decoding Function

f(x) = 3x + 2

g(x) = (x – 2) / 3

f(x) = 7x – 5

g(x) = (x + 5) / 7

f(x) = 4x

g(x) = x / 4

f(x) = 6x

g(x) = x / 6

f(x) = 8x

g(x) = x / 8

f(x) = x + 20

g(x) x – 20

f(x) = x + 9

g(x) = x – 9

f(x) = 5x – 1

g(x) = (x+1) / 5

f(x) = 7x + 10

g(x) = (x – 10) / 7

f(x) = x + 5

g(x) = x – 5

f(x) = x – 10

g(x) = x + 10

f(x) = x – 5

g(x) = x + 5

f(x) = x + 10

g(x) = x – 10

f(x) = x + 2

g(x) = x – 2[supanova_question]

Mass politics and nationalism as military revolution: The French Revolution and after

Descriiption: A Personal Philosophy of Nursing is an important piece of every nurse’s toolkit. This personal philosophy outlines the Mass politics and nationalism as military revolution: The French Revolution and after

MACGREGOR KNOX [W]ar … again became the affair of the people as a whole, and took on an entirely different character, or rather approached its true character, its absolute perfection.1 —Carl von Clausewitz The revolution of industrial capitalism and of science and technology is the greatest transformation in human existence since the coming of agriculture. It began in the late eighteenth century and its end is not in sight. It has given such immense power to the societies that pioneered it or adopted it that it has obscured a fundamental truth: military revolutions are changes in the nature and purposes of war itself. They are normally the military outcome of underlying processes – ideological, political, social, economic, and demographic – far deeper and broader than the advent of a particular technology or cluster of technologies. While the Industrial Revolution was achieving – for the first time in human history – self-sustaining and seemingly limitless growth in Britain’s textile mills, mines, and foundries, a political revolution with consequences almost as great erupted across the Channel. The upheaval of 1788–94 was not merely a revolution in France. It marked the beginning of the exceedingly violent end, first in France and then throughout Europe, of an entire social, political, and international order. The events in France brought mass politics and mass warfare to Europe, and ultimately to the world. The Revolution represented the political breakthrough of the notion, increasingly widespread among the pre-1789 French intelligentsia, that France was not a dynastic unit but an ethnic-linguistic identity, la nation. Revolution swept away the old nation of king, nobles, and Church, and created with startling bloodshed a new nation of citizens theoretically free and equal under the law and the guillotine. Asserting equality within and sovereignty without plunged the new nation into war with most of Europe and forced the decapitation of the king – and of the old society he had personified – in January 1793. The war of 1792 to 1814/ 15 thus became – first unilaterally by France and then by the belated and usually hesitant response of France’s victims – the first modern war, the first war between nations.2 Far more than the religious struggles before 1648 it was a type of war potentially unlimited in both aims and methods, for nations by their very nature recognize no higher power. As the foremost theorist of the Revolution, the Abbé Sieyès, proclaimed in 1789, “the nation exists before everything; it is at the origin of everything; its will is always legal, it is the law itself.”3 BEFORE THE REVOLUTION The military revolution that emerged in and from the Revolution’s wars was a political–ideological revolution that remade warfare from top to bottom, from strategy, to operations and logistics, to tactics. Understanding its origins and consequences requires a brief backward glance at the framework of Old Regime politics and war. The state system that emerged after 1648 from the wars of religion rested, with a few exceptions or partial exceptions that included England and the Dutch Republic, on rigidly hierarchical societies divided into occupational groups or castes that for the most part traced their origins back to the Middle Ages. All below the monarch in these “societies of orders” were subjects, not citizens, with all the subordination and lack of initiative and independent will the word implies. Politics was almost exclusively the affair of monarchs and ministers. Under their aegis, the centralizing administrative and legal reforms characteristic of the eighteenth century remodeled the society of orders in the name of enlightenment – a word almost synonymous in practice with massive increases in state power over the individual. Even republics – the Dutch and the free cities of the Holy Roman Empire – or parliamentary regimes such as England were in both theory and practice ruled by narrow oligarchies of merchants or landowners. The occasional riot and the carefully circumscribed roles allotted to consultative assemblies largely defined popular participation in politics. Foreign policy and war were and remained the central functions of states which resisted popular interference with the utmost jealousy. And consciousness of belonging to a broader unit than the village, region, and estate was limited. Even in France, the largest and most economically advanced society of continental western Europe, literacy was confined to perhaps a third of the population, and overwhelmingly to town-dwellers. The military implications of these conditions were many, but are swiftly summed up: social and political forces drastically curtailed both the aims and the methods of the contenders in the Old Regime’s many wars. War aims that required efforts or summoned up risks that might imperil internal order and the exclusive control of politics by king and ministers were rare indeed. Exceptions did exist: fanatics such as Charles XII of Sweden or icy gamblers such as Frederick the Great might risk the very existence of their states on the battlefield. Occasionally, as in the coalition of France, Austria, and Russia against Prussia in the Seven Years’ War or the collusion of Austria, Prussia, and Russia in the partition of Poland, powers might aim at the total destruction of other powers. But no state seriously entertained the notion of arming its subjects irrespective of their estate. The greatest tactical theorist of the Old Regime, the comte François de Guibert, scornfully and accurately summed up in 1772 the normal pattern of warfare: States have neither treasure nor surplus population. Their expenditure outstrips their revenues even in peace. Nevertheless they declare war. They take the field with armies they can neither recruit nor pay. Victors and vanquished alike are exhausted. The mass of the national debt increases. Credit falls. Money grows scarce. Fleets are at a loss for sailors and armies for soldiers. The ministers on both sides feel it is time to negotiate. Peace is made. A few colonies or provinces change masters. Often the source of the quarrels is not dried up, and each side sits on its shattered remains while it attempts to pay its debts and sharpen its weapons.4 Both the imperative of maintaining political control and the relative lack of military means – despite the increasing centralization and efficiency of Europe’s states – kept aims limited. The military art of the Old Regime suffered from interlocking and crippling constraints on mass, mobility, and decisiveness that were

irremediable within its social and political order. Almost all these limits stemmed not from technological constraints overcome in the revolutionary era, but from social and military-organizational bottlenecks in the recruitment, nature, and motivation of the individual soldier on the one hand and in the system of command and control on the other. The soldiers of the Old Regime were the product of military institutions inextricable from the society of orders that they defended. In France, the sweepings of the taverns of cities and market towns predominated, along with Swiss and other foreign mercenaries; in Russia, the state snatched serfs from their villages for twenty-five years of service; in Prussia from the 1730s, peasant conscription as well as voluntary and foreign recruitment filled the ranks of the line infantry. A few far-seeing contemporaries understood fully the military consequences of this situation, and Guibert was predictably scathing: Today all the armies of Europe, with small differences, have the same character, that is an imperfect one, that poorly exploits the available means, and that rests neither on honor nor on patriotism. All armies are composed of the lowest [la plus vile] and most pitiful segment of the citizens, [and] of foreigners, of vagabonds, of men who, for the slightest cause, [such as] personal interests or discontents, are ready to desert. These are the armies of governments, not those of nations.5 They were also armies largely devoid of command articulation. Controlmania was the foremost characteristic of the eighteenth century’s philosophy of command. The ideal was the great Frederick sternly directing the machinelike advance of his battalions from a low hill, the Feldherrenhügel, that commanded a view of the entire battlefield. Only around mid-century did French theorists such as Guibert and Pierre de Bourcet pioneer the notion of self-contained infantry–artillery and all-arms divisions, urge supply by plunder rather than wagon train, and propose concentration during rather than before battle.6 Four principal factors thus frustrated attempts to assemble and move large masses of men. First, in all these societies the higher and middle estates along with virtually all gainfully employed townspeople enjoyed exemptions from service ordained by custom or law, and by the state’s pressing interest in tax revenue. That deprived the armies of significant numbers and of much of the state’s stock of talent. Second, the prevailing tactical and disciplinary system further restricted numbers. States recognized that domestic enlistees and foreign mercenaries were exceedingly expensive and time-consuming to train in the “battle culture of forbearance,” and even more expensive and difficult to maintain. The troops’ lack of inner motivation other than compulsory esprit de corps required – or was thought to require – the inculcation of Kadavergehorsam – “corpse-obedience” – as the Prussian service jestingly described the conditioned reflexes designed to keep even the dead in line, advancing and discharging ordered volleys. And the punishments required – or believed to be required – to convert the lower orders into automatons, to prevent their subsequent escape, and to keep them rigidly in line on the battlefield were drastic and frequent. Frederick summed up the prevailing command view in 1768 in a much-quoted remark: the troops must fear their officers more than all the dangers to which they may be exposed. Otherwise no one will be able to lead them to the attack in the face of three hundred muskets

thundering at them. Good will can never induce the common man to defy such dangers; fear must therefore do the job.7 Fear without propaganda – of which the Old Regime was incapable – required the sacrifice of most other forms of motivation, and thus curtailed further the meager manpower resources available to the state. Third, the tendency of the troops to desert if unsupervised by officers or NCOs restricted the size and mobility of armies. Commanders could not allow their line infantry to forage; operations remained tied to regular supply by wagon trains from magazines. That laborious technique could not support, even in the few areas of western Europe with roads that were not mud-wallows, armies larger than perhaps 70,000 men. It also drastically limited operational movement, for fifty to seventy miles was the furthest from a magazine that an army could move without losing its supply links, and the decisive importance of those same links made armies fatally vulnerable to flank attack. Logistical inadequacy also magnified the importance of manmade bottlenecks – the many fortresses controlling road or river junctions around which much of eighteenth century warfare revolved. Finally, the absence of divisional organization and of adequate staffs for the theater commander further reinforced the logistical constraints on operations, for even had larger armies been available, operational control would scarcely have been possible. These limits made Old Regime warfare profoundly indecisive. At the strategic level, limited aims – “a few colonies or provinces” – did not warrant great risks or any rethinking of the domestic order. Troops were too expensive and difficult to procure and train to hazard lightheartedly on the battlefield. And the brittleness of armies held together largely by coercion argued powerfully against seeking a decision at all costs, a precept only the most skilled and ruthless of Old Regime commanders – Marlborough and Frederick the Great – dared to disregard. Operationally, unalterable restrictions likewise condemned combatants to protracted and indecisive struggle. The logistical restraints on field army size limited commanders’ chances of outflanking or trapping the enemy. Armies dared not outrun their supply trains. Even small threats to their communications immobilized them. Movement required foresight and planning to avoid the confusion that might offer the troops yet more opportunities to desert. Dispersed movement was difficult or impossible, given the character of the troops and the lack of divisional organization and specialized staffs. Reconnaissance was available only to the few armies well-provided with reliable light cavalry or light infantry whose primary motivation was loyalty rather than fear. Finally, decision at the tactical level was unusually difficult. Fear of desertion and control-mania crippled tactical reconnaissance and delayed or prevented the introduction – except for specially trained picked troops – of open-order combat or skirmishing. The relative absence of skirmishers in turn drastically reduced the effectiveness of the attack. It prevented major actions in broken terrain except in exceptional circumstances, it restricted the firefight largely to frontally delivered volleys, and it deprived commanders seeking decision of the surprise in the strength and direction of the attack that screens of skirmishers alone could provide. Night attacks risked loss of tactical and disciplinary control even more than did skirmishing, and were correspondingly rare. Finally and most decisively, the kind of pursuit needed to destroy beaten enemies and convert battlefield success

into strategically binding decision offered too great a risk of chaos to be practical for most eighteenth-century armies. These restraints on what Clausewitz later described as war’s true nature were social, political, and organizational rather than technological. With the sole important exception of the French royal army’s mobile field artillery, a significant but evolutionary change dating from the reforms of the comte de Gribeauval in the 1770s, the powers fought the great war of 1791–1815 with the technology of the wars of Frederick the Great. What changed was ideas and politics. THE REVOLUTION AT WAR A quarter of a century before the revolution that was to give his tactical, operational, and strategic ideas full scope, Guibert dedicated his General Essay on Tactics to his Fatherland (Patrie). The king was for him still the father of the Patrie; the people of France were its children – an image that anticipated the famous first line of the Marseillaise. Guibert’s fondest hope was that “one could return to this term Patrie all its significance and energy, [and] make it the cry of the nation.” That was a hope widely shared in the advanced and fashionable Paris circles in which Guibert’s book enjoyed – precisely because it invoked the Patrie – a success unprecedented for a military-technical work. The monarchy’s subsequent downfall was in large part a delayed consequence of the offense that royal military and fiscal incompetence had given to the exalted sense of the nation that the educated and enlightened held.8 The monarchy’s prestige never recovered from stinging defeat at Frederick’s hands at Rossbach in 1757, and the catastrophic effect of the Seven Years’ War and the War of the American Revolution on its finances were the root of its political and administrative collapse in 1787–89. The inability of king and ministers to translate into policy the revolutionaries’ lofty view of the dignity of the fatherland unhinged from the beginning the disastrous experiment of constitutional monarchy in 1789–92. Nationalist fanaticism, egalitarian zeal, revolutionary paranoia inflamed by the king’s failed flight and continuing contacts with the émigré nobility, and cold political calculation led the Legislative Assembly of 1791–92 to challenge all of Europe.9 From the fall of 1791 onward the Girondin wing of the revolutionaries proclaimed openly to the Assembly that “this war will be a true blessing; a national blessing; and the only calamity France has to fear is not to have war.” The national interest “required war, for the nation must will its dignity, its majesty, its security, and its credit, and can only reconquer them at sword-point.”10 The new France was incompatible with the old system of dynastic interstate relations: “the treaties of princes cannot govern the rights of nations.”11 The new France was “invincible if it remained united”; “With 400,000 slaves Louis XIV could defy all the powers of Europe: should we, with our millions of armed men, fear them?”12 And the new France had a cosmic mission: “The French have become the most noteworthy people in the universe; their conduct must now correspond to their new destiny.”13 Externally, war would be “the salvation both of France and of the human race,” a world revolutionary war of “peoples against kings”; “the French people only had to cry out, and all other peoples would answer its call and the earth would fill with fighting men; and, at a single blow, the enemies of equality would be expunged from the rolls of the living.”14

War would be total: “the French are lions, and would defend themselves in a manner that would leave no man alive nor tree standing; they would bury themselves under the ruin of their great houses and peasant hovels. … The soil of France would be enslaved, but [the French] would die free, together with [their] wives, [their] children, and [their] flocks [applause].”15 And war would also be internal, against the “snares and perfidy” of the Revolution’s enemies: “no citizen, priest, general, minister, king or anyone else shall deceive us with impunity; the die is cast; we resolve on equality even if we are to find it only in the grave – yet before we descend there ourselves, we shall hurl down into it all the traitors.”16 This war – as the two principal orators and leaders of the Girondins both summed it up – was simultaneously foreign and domestic. War was “indispensable for consummating the revolution.”17 The collective wisdom of the industrial democracies at the turn of the twenty-first century tends to discount heroic oratory of the kind quoted above. Advertising for the masses and post-modernism for the elite have between them devalued “rhetoric” or “discourse” – life is all TV. But in 1792–94 the more perceptive officers of the Prussian and Austrian armies soon recognized that French rhetoric dictated battlefield reality. Clausewitz, who first saw action in 1793 at the age of twelve, had little doubt about the nature of the connection: “the colossal weight of the whole French people, unhinged by political fanaticism, came crashing down upon us.”18 In this first great conflict of the era of mass politics, fanaticism abolished all theoretical limits on the aims and methods of warfare. The Revolution’s practice and its development by Napoleon were the living models for Clausewitz’s Kantian abstract notion of absolute war: “war is an act of force, and there is no logical limit to the application of that force.”19 The revolutionary government’s aim of world revolution ordained an empire that stretched to the Rhine and beyond. The passing of the wave of revolutionary enthusiasm in 1794 had no moderating effect, and Bonaparte’s growing thirst for universal domination after 1799 was simply a personalization, in the name of a shared Patrie, of the revolutionaries’ mission of saving the human race through sacred violence by the French nation. The new politics abolished, along with the society of orders, all theoretical limits on the state’s actions. Individual lives and property were unconditionally at the nation’s service. Pervasive police surveillance, persecution and extermination of real and imagined enemies on a scale and with a brutality unseen again in Europe until 1917–45, and quasi-universal military service became the order of the day. Abroad as at home, the revolutionaries acknowledged no limits either of custom or pity; they turned swiftly and savagely on all of France’s neighbors who obtusely “refuse[d] to accept liberty and equality, and renouncing it, might wish to preserve, recall, or negotiate with their prince or privileged castes.” By September 1793 France had solemnly “renounc[ed] from henceforth every philanthropic idea previously adopted by the French people for the purpose of making foreign nations appreciate the value and the benefits of liberty.” France, as Guibert had preached – invoking Cato the Elder – would henceforth “nourish war by war.”20 The French state asserted an unlimited right of conquest and officially proclaimed plunder as its system of logistics. Finally, the Revolution abolished the limits on warfare embodied in the character of the Old Regime’s armies. The troops were now not social outcasts but “our friends, fellows, citizens, and soldiers of the Patrie.” Revolutionary nationalist propaganda built around the defense and international self-assertion of that

Patrie and resting on ideological terror powerfully motivated the troops. The aim, in the words of the Revolution’s minister of war, was thinking obedience, “not the obedience of slaves, but that of free men.”21 Once in the field, the new soldiers deserted less than their Old Regime counterparts – and desertion mattered less, for men were now plentiful and cheap. They faced the enemy willingly and fought inventively and tenaciously. And their leaders were also new men, for the collapse of the society of orders in 1789–90 and the increasing radicalization of the Revolution had entailed the emigration of the vast majority of the old army’s aristocratic officer corps. The resulting vacuum, the ideology of equality, and the revolutionary fervor and paranoia that prompted the execution of seventeen generals in 1793 and sixty-seven in 1794 brought the “career open to talent” in warfare – and general officers who a few years before had been privates, or sergeants, or (like Bonaparte) lieutenants. Almost half of the officer corps of summer 1794 had not served even as private soldiers under the Old Regime.22 The prospect of further promotion combined powerfully with devotion to France and fear of the guillotine – “sword of equality” – to drive them and their men forward into battle. Strategically, the Revolution’s unlimited aims and growing means – 750,000 men in the field by mid-1794 – demanded the destruction of the enemy armies by battle. And the new French armies soon proved they had the cohesion even in defeat to warrant taking extreme risks for victory. Operationally, the new soldier made unprecedented movement possible. Nationalism made the logistics of plunder practical; troops foraged merrily but usually did not desert.23 That freed armies to move dispersed and bypass the many fortresses built to stalemate the hesitant forces of the Old Regime. Commanders no longer tied to fixed bases and supply lines could swiftly change the direction and speed of large units, and move great distances into an unsuspecting enemy’s rear. Confusion on the march was no longer a prelude to disintegration; broken country no longer a deterrent. And the new logistics, when combined with the brigade and divisional organization systematized in the Army Regulations of 1791 and in war after 1792, allowed dispersed movement and concentration on the field of battle itself. Tactically, the new soldiers gave us the modern battlefield, peopled increasingly – as firepower intensified – by dispersed individuals rather than close-order formations. At first largely from improvisation, then by design, the French armies of 1792–95 preceded their advance with clouds of skirmishers. Behind them came the ordre mixte of column for swift movement and line for the firefight outlined by Guibert and enshrined in the great Regulations of 1791. Commanders could freely alternate skirmishers, column, or line depending on terrain and situation. The mobile artillery of Gribeauval offered close support, and the infantry was trustworthy enough for the pursuit that could alone transform enemy defeat into rout and total destruction. NAPOLEONIC SYNTHESIS, PRUSSIAN RESPONSE The Revolution had transformed war; war also transformed the Revolution. By the late 1790s the immense prestige of victory and the delights of plunder had made the army rather than the politicians the motor of French expansion and the embodiment of French nationalism. Its most striking figure, the young General Bonaparte, added only a few personal touches to his political, organizational, and doctrinal inheritance after seizing supreme power in 1799. As an artilleryman, he privileged his branch and used it lavishly to make up for the growing lack of

tactical subtlety of his infantry as years passed and losses mounted. He perfected the divisional system by grouping divisions and other units flexibly, according to the task at hand, into all-arms army corps. Huge armies of 150,000 to 500,000 men divided into corps could thus move dispersed a day’s or two day’s marches apart, linked by screening cavalry and couriers. Each corps was small enough to avoid logistical embarrassment but by design strong enough to face an enemy army for a day or two, until the remaining French corps, under Napoleon’s fierce urging, could close on the enemy flank or rear. To control these widely dispersed formations Napoleon created a staff system and headquarters that despite a lack of decision-making power and many structural deficiencies was of a size and complexity never before seen; by 1812 it numbered 3,500 officers and 10,000 men including escort troops. Finally, the emperor provided a degree of unity of command in the field and at the summit of the state only equaled in recent memory by Frederick the Great, and a fertility in operational expedients, a driving energy, and a speed of execution all his own.24 From 1800 onward he routinized and made permanent the mass recruitment and nationalist passion of the revolutionary armies. The dichotomy sometimes drawn between the nation-in-arms of 1793 moved by revolutionary enthusiasm and the professional soldiers of the late 1790s and the Napoleonic Empire moved solely or primarily by honors and esprit de corps is implausible.25 The amateurs of ‘93 were professional enough to defeat the best troops of the Old Regime through skill as well as enthusiasm. The professionals of Austerlitz and Jena–Auerstädt and after were recruited overwhelmingly by the quasi-universal annual conscription authorized by General Jourdan’s law of 1798 and so expanded by Napoleon that the army raised two million troops between 1800 and 1814.26 The Emperor himself had no doubt about the system’s central importance to France: “Without conscription,” he wrote in 1804, “neither national power nor national independence is possible … our success and the strength of our position depend on our having a national army; we must take care to preserve this advantage.”27 The soldiers of this army went into battle for France as well as for their units, leaders, and emperor, and for the honors and rewards he offered. Napoleon for his part strengthened his always precarious legitimacy by the continued invocation of patriotic–revolutionary symbols; he had the “Chant du depart,” most famous of the fighting songs of the early 1790s besides the Marseillaise, played to fire the troops on the morning of Austerlitz.28 Clausewitz’s description of the Napoleonic army as “this juggernaut of war, based on the strength of the entire people” was not verbal excess.29 Napoleon’s most lasting achievement was twofold: to make the French army the army of the nation on a permanent basis, and to thereby durably if partially militarize that same nation. The peasantry inevitably resisted, and the state grudgingly conceded exemptions for those wealthy enough to pay a tax and a substitute. But evasion of conscription gradually diminished, reaching remarkably low levels in 1811–13.30 The emperor had “rendered honorable, because compulsory, the calling of the private soldier.”31 Nor did Napoleon have any intention of allowing wealth to escape. With the enthusiastic backing of the army, he sought to make the officer corps the dominant component of France’s post-revolutionary elite, and to lure or compel the sons of France’s notables to serve in it. Astonishingly high pay and lavish perquisites, rising to stratospheric heights for generals and marshals, was one element in this program of social engineering. Another was military precedence in ceremonial protocol at all levels, from the

village, to the prefecture, to Paris itself. Soldiers and officers predominated crushingly among those awarded the Legion of Honor. By imperial order, high school students paraded in uniform; “war was in, and the drum muffled in my ear the voices of the schoolmasters,” as Alfred de Vigny later recalled.32 First the Revolution and then Napoleon – his victories, institutions, and memories – made France, for the next century and more, a military nation as it had never been under the Old Regime.33 Its adversaries inevitably responded in kind – but only one took up the challenge fully in the revolutionary era itself. “Peoples’ war” as practiced against the French invaders by Calabrian banditi, Spanish guerrillas, Tyrolese mountaineers, and Russian serfs and Cossacks was not modern. Austria, despite its invocation of the “German nation” in 1809, was structurally incapable of following the French example very far, even had the Archduke Charles, its most perceptive and successful military leader, so wished.34 Britain’s staggering level of manpower mobilization by 181214 and its outstripping of French military and naval expenditure by a factor of perhaps five helped create a fragile sense of nationhood among its disparate peoples. But that effort did not require revolutionary changes, either political or military, to an Old Regime that survives to the present.35 Only one power – indeed one institution – took up the French challenge with almost Jacobin zeal: the army of Prussia. Prussia’s transformation followed Napoleon’s crushing defeat of its army at Jena–Auerstadt in October 1806, and was in part a consequence of Prussian peculiarities. War was Prussia’s reason for existence, and even the most timid or recalcitrant of its conservative–noble military caste perceived after 1806 that Prussia must learn to win battles again, or cease to exist. But Prussia’s transformation was also a consequence of the dynamics of nationalism. France had led the way – and the German-speaking lands had been its first victim. The armed hordes of the French had brutalized a people whose intelligentsia, for all the cosmopolitanism sometimes ascribed to it, contributed as much to the theory of nationalism as the French themselves. Modern German literature, born as the eighteenth century wore on among the small Protestant middle class of pastors and bureaucrats, was in part a reaction to the aping of French letters and manners by the aristocracy of western Germany. “Spew out the ugly slime of the Seine / Speak German, O you German!” thundered Friedrich Gottlieb Herder, the virtual inventor both of the theory of ethnic–linguistic nationalism and of nationalism’s German variant.36 French conquest of Germany’s borders in the 1790s and of its central core in 1800–06 transformed literary movement into political religion. The prophets of the German nation, from writers of patriotic verse such as Arndt, to philosophers such as Fichte, to dramatists such as Heinrich von Kleist, created a national cult that rested on the Protestant apocalypse, highly colored fantasies of the Germanic–tribal and medieval–imperial past, the French revolutionaries’ Rousseauvian vision of a regenerated nation of citizens rendered incapable of disobeying the general will, and a sense of world mission that made the Jacobins seem tame. Pitiless hostility to the French was the lowest common denominator; Kleist, in his bloodthirsty verse drama on Arminius’ destruction of the Roman invaders in 9 A.D., summed up the general sentiment when he commanded the extermination of the enemy in biblical tones: “Strike him dead: the Last Judgment will not ask your reasons!”37 These ideas fused, perceptibly if as yet imperfectly, with the traditions of the Prussian army and state after 1806–07. Their bearers were the cadre of

reformers, many of them neither Prussian nor noble by origin, to whom King Frederick William III grudgingly turned after Jena: Heinrich von und zum Stein for the civilians, and for the army Gerhard von Scharnhorst, August von Gneisenau, Hermann von Boyen, Karl von Grolman, and (as Scharnhorst’s assistant) Carl von Clausewitz.38 The military reformers had two revolutionary answers to Napoleon: the thinking combatants that only universal military service could provide, and a thinking officer corps and staff system honed by Bildung – systematic professional study and the cultivation of decision-making skill. To make universal service possible, the reformers proposed something wholly new and alien to Prussian absolutism: an “alliance of government and people.”39 The state decreed the abolition of serfdom in 1807, and the army ended corporal punishment in 1808. In 1813, after Napoleon’s defeat in Russia allowed Prussia to break with France, the reformers organized militia formations and volunteer light infantry units for the middle classes alongside the infantry of the line.40 The following year, after a revived Prussian army of almost 300,000 men had helped drive Napoleon from Germany and his throne, they promulgated Europe’s first genuine universal service law, the Wehrgesetz. The law, which after radical increases in scope in 1860–67 remained in essence in effect until 1918, proclaimed the militarization of society with a thoroughness that had escaped even Napoleon: the new army was to be the “chief school of the nation for war.” Unlike France, Prussia barely flinched at middle-class distaste for service in the ranks. Not substitution, but a one-year term of service and opportunity to become a reserve officer or NCO was Prussia’s principal concession to wealth and status, and that concession promised and ultimately delivered the most military-minded middle classes in the world. The officer corps changed as much as the troops. To expunge defeat and open the way for talent, the reformers carried through a purge that surpassed in rigor any such measure ever inflicted upon itself by a sizable modern military–bureaucratic institution; Napoleon helped by demanding a massive reduction in the army’s size. In the end, barely over half the officer corps of 1806 fought in the wars of 1813–15.41 Simultaneously, the reformers ended the jealous noble quasi-monopoly of the officer corps upon which the great Frederick had insisted; from August 1808 the officer caste was open to all possessing “knowledge and education [Bildung] in peacetime … and in war outstanding bravery and military judgment.” Prospective officers now entered the ranks as officer candidates, and had to pass competitive written examinations before being coopted, subject to royal approval, by the officers of their regiment.42 Bildung was at the root of the new operational methods and tactics that combined the distilled essence of the best in French practice with the results of analysis and experiment, and made the Prussian army of 1813–15 at last equal or superior to its enemy in movement, flexibility, inventiveness, and fighting power. The Regulations of 1812, endpoint of the army’s retraining after Jena, made light infantry tactics the common property of all infantry units, which now trained in the swift and interchangeable employment of skirmishing, line, and column and the use of artillery and cavalry support.43 Bildung was also at the center of a fourth great reform, after the revolutions in recruitment, officer selection, and operational and tactical technique: that of the high command. Scharnhorst’s reflections on Napoleon’s campaigns and his first-hand experience of Prussia’s floundering without a Frederick the Great in 1806 had persuaded him that the army must find a way to do without genius at

the top.44 His answer was a reformed staff system based on specialized military education for the very brightest junior and middle-level officers. The center of that education was critical thought resting on thorough professional and military–historical understanding; its aim was aptitude and eagerness for independent action. Scharnhorst aimed to make staff officers not merely assistants to commanders, but a sort of central nervous system for strategic planning and operational control that would harness the collective wisdom of the best minds the army could recruit. The mass armies created in the French military revolution thus secured a reliable mechanism, independent of individual genius, for ensuring that hundreds of thousands of men would “fight in the right place at the right time.”45 CONCLUSION: TO 1941 AND BEYOND The victors of 1814–15 failed to suppress for long either nationalist revolution or the military revolution it had launched. No one could “disinvent” mass politics or mass warfare. Governments and armies ignored the pressing need for thinking warriors at their peril; the storm of steel of the Industrial Revolution increasingly emptied the battlefield of formations, reducing even junior leaders’ span of control to the few men they could reach by crawling. And demographic expansion continually increased the size of armies and the necessity of ever more sophisticated mechanisms of command and control – which only some approximation of the Prussian staff system could provide. Scharnhorst and his colleagues had remolded the Prussian army-state for the age of mass politics. Perhaps contrary to their partly liberal intentions, they and their less liberal successors produced Europe’s most perfectly militarized society and most professional mass army. German nationalism’s peculiarly violent character and limitless aspirations then combined with the new-won military self-assurance of the German people to carry strategic-ideological lunacy far beyond the high standards that the Girondins, Jacobins, and Bonaparte had set. The final lineal descendant of the reformed Prussian army of 1813–15 was the “National Socialist people’s army” of 1939–45, which fought the greatest war in history to consummate a racist world revolution, and realized the Prussian reformers’ career open to talent in ways that would have filled them with horror.46 The increasingly automated firepower of the permanent revolution of science and technology is at last ending the age of the armed horde that began in 1792–94. But the political religion of the nation-state remains mighty on Europe’s fringes and among the rising powers of East Asia. The German Revolution’s terrifying combination of professional military organization and technological mastery with mass fanaticism – Panzerdivisionen, V-2S, and racial–ideological extermination – should warn against overestimating the military decisiveness of technology alone, or its ability to define the nature of warfare.[supanova_question]

MICROECONOMICS HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT 2021 PART 1: Answer the following questions. (5 percent

MICROECONOMICS HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT 2021

PART 1: Answer the following questions. (5 percent each)

1) List the three main forms of business ownership.

2) What is the law of demand? What is the law of supply?

3) List the four levels of competition in markets.

4) What is the difference between a labor strike and a lockout?

PART 2: Problems. Show your work. (10 percent each)

1) Accounting and Economic Profit: Figure out the accounting and economic profit based on the following information. A person decided to go to an expensive private four year college. They took out loans that totaled $80,000 with a monthly repayment amount of $830 based on the interest rate they received and a ten year repayment. They obtained employment in the field they wanted with an annual gross income of $60,000. This person could have went to a state university and taken out $20,000 total of student loans that would have a monthly repayment of $207 and obtained employment in their field with a different company that would pay an annual gross income of $55,000. Based on this information calculate both their accounting profit and also their economic profit for one year. (Note: for this problem we are using gross income and ignoring the 77,000 + page IRS code.)

2) Price Elasticity: Use the following equation to answer the problem and identify if the answer represents either elastic, inelastic, or unit elastic

Percentage Change in Quantity

Ed = Demanded of Product X

_____________________

Percentage Change in Price

of Product X

A) The price of movie tickets increases 8.5% and quantity demanded decreases by 11.5%.

Ed=

B) The price of pizza decreases by 5% and quantity demanded increased by 3.5%.

Ed=

C) The price of wheat increases by 4.25% and quantity demanded decreases by 4.25%.

Ed=

3) Economics of Taxation:

A) If a student who files their tax return receives the American Opportunity Tax Credit for $2,500, and they are in the 15% tax bracket, then what is their tax savings?

B) If a taxpayer who files their tax return receives a tax deduction for $10,000 and they are in the 15% tax bracket, then what is their tax savings?

4) Global Economy: Complete the following table by indicating if the U.S. dollar appreciated or depreciated against the selected currencies of the time frame given. The values in the table represent how much one U.S. dollar is compared to the other currencies.

Currency

8/10/10

4/26/13

U.S. dollar

Appreciate or Depreciate

Euro

Mexican Peso

Japanese Yen

Canadian Dollar

U.K. Pound

.76

12.67

85.77

1.04

.63

.77

12.16

97.94

1.02

.65

____________

____________

____________

____________
____________

PART 3: Short answer. Answer the following using complete sentences. (10 percent each)

1) Supply and Demand: Use the following graphs to answer A thru D.

A-B) For each graph, explain a market situation that will explain the shift. Also explain the result of the shift for equilibrium price and quantity.

2) Competition Level: Given the following information that was found on the internet for the cereal industry, identify which level of competition this would be classified as, and explain why. Identify and explain if the products are standard or differentiated. Explain based on the level of competition what non-price competition there is such as advertising, etc. (Note: since private label is #4, use Quaker as the 4th largest in this industry.)

3) Global Economy: List and explain the three main barriers to trade that a government can put in place. Include in your answer why they would do this and how each barrier would impact trade.

4) Economic Systems: Compare and contrast the main differences between a market system and a command system.[supanova_question]

Descriiption: A Personal Philosophy of Nursing is an important piece of every nurse’s toolkit. This personal philosophy outlines the

Descriiption: A Personal Philosophy of Nursing is an important piece of every nurse’s toolkit. This personal philosophy outlines the

I work as a Registered Nurse in the Emergency Room and in mental health and substance use issues. I’m

I work as a Registered Nurse in the Emergency Room and in mental health and substance use issues. I’m. I work as a Registered Nurse in the Emergency Room and in mental health and substance use issues. I’m.

I work as a Registered Nurse in the Emergency Room and in mental health and substance use issues. I’m studying to become a Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner. Please ensure that your essay is unique, as it will be examined for plagiarism. Please use sources within the next five years. Thank you very much.[supanova_question]

I work as a Registered Nurse in the Emergency Room and in mental health and substance use issues. I’m

I work as a Registered Nurse in the Emergency Room and in mental health and substance use issues. I’m

Writing about Chisago County, Minnesota. Nursing diagnosis to focus on healthy weights related to mental health issues, food insecurities, Essay

Writing about Chisago County, Minnesota. Nursing diagnosis to focus on healthy weights related to mental health issues, food insecurities, Essay. Writing about Chisago County, Minnesota. Nursing diagnosis to focus on healthy weights related to mental health issues, food insecurities, Essay.

Writing about Chisago County, Minnesota. Nursing diagnosis to focus on healthy weights related to mental health issues, food insecurities, diabeties, and high provider to pt. ratios.

Paper format (20 points)
3-5 pages (not including title and reference page) typed (12 Times Roman/Arial Font) in APA format
Title page and reference page
No spelling or grammatical errors

Paper outline similar to this:
Introduction
Community resources
Priority diagnoses, the goal and reason for the change
Realistic solution
Health education
Role of the nurse and community in the intervention
Conclusion
Community resources (15 points)
Identified and analyzed
How will the resources support the intervention of your nursing diagnosis?
Priority diagnosis, the goal for change, and rationale (15 points)
Develop a realistic solution to your nursing diagnosis in a teaching manner (evidenced-based practice) (20 points)
Describe the health education you will promote which follows from your nursing diagnosis (20 points)
Describe the role of the nurse and other community members in the interventions (10 points)

Rubric
NM352 Unit 8 Week 15 – Public Health Paper Rubric
Criteria Ratings Pts
This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeCommunity Resources
Community resources identified, analyzed, and support the intervention
15 pts
Level 5
Community resources clearly identified and analyzed and how they will support the intervention of your nursing diagnosis
13.5 pts
Level 4
The student fulfills most of the assignment expectations.
12 pts
Level 3
The student fulfills some of the assignment expectations.
10.5 pts
Level 2
The student partially fulfills the assignment expectations.
9 pts
Level 1
The student does not fulfill assignment expectations.
0 pts
Level 0
The student did not submit a paper.
15 pts
This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeNursing Diagnosis
Identify priority diagnosis, the goal for change, and rationale
15 pts
Level 5
Clearly identifies priority diagnosis, the goal for change, and rationale
13.5 pts
Level 4
The student fulfills most of the assignment expectations.
12 pts
Level 3
The student fulfills some of the assignment expectations.
10.5 pts
Level 2
The student partially fulfills the assignment expectations.
9 pts
Level 1
The student does not fulfill assignment expectations.
0 pts
Level 0
The student did not submit a paper.
15 pts
This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeEvidenced-based Solution
Realistic solution to nursing diagnosis
20 pts
Level 5
Clearly develops a realistic solution to the identified nursing diagnosis in a teaching manner (evidenced-based practice)
18 pts
Level 4
The student fulfills most of the assignment expectations.
16 pts
Level 3
The student fulfills some of the assignment expectations.
14 pts
Level 2
The student partially fulfills the assignment expectations.
12 pts
Level 1
The student does not fulfill assignment expectations.
0 pts
Level 0
The student did not submit a paper.
20 pts
This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomePromoting Health Education
Describe the health education you will promote
20 pts
Level 5
Clearly describes the health education you will promote which follows from your nursing diagnosis
18 pts
Level 4
The student fulfills most of the assignment expectations.
16 pts
Level 3
The student fulfills some of the assignment expectations.
14 pts
Level 2
The student partially fulfills the assignment expectations.
12 pts
Level 1
The student does not fulfill assignment expectations.
0 pts
Level 0
The student did not submit a paper.
20 pts
This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeRole of Nurse and Community Members
Describe the role of the nurse and other community members in the interventions
10 pts
Level 5
Clearly describes the role of the nurse and other community members in the intervention
9 pts
Level 4
The student fulfills most of the assignment expectations.
8 pts
Level 3
The student fulfills some of the assignment expectations.
7 pts
Level 2
The student partially fulfills the assignment expectations.
6 pts
Level 1
The student does not fulfill assignment expectations.
0 pts
Level 0
The student did not submit a paper.
10 pts
This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomePaper Format
APA, Format, Grammar, etc.
PRICE-I
20 pts
Level 5
The paper is formatted correctly according to APA 6th edition and includes a title page, in-text citations, reference list, correct font, and a complete reference list.
18 pts
Level 4
Incorrectly cites in-text references. Has 1-2 formatting errors.
16 pts
Level 3
Paper has 3-4 formatting errors. References are incomplete or incorrectly formatted.
14 pts
Level 2
Incorrect format in most places. References incomplete and incorrectly formatted. Student needs to make revisions if the paper violates the Herzing University Academic Integrity Policy.
12 pts
Level 1
Incorrect format throughout. No reference page. Student needs to make revisions if the paper violates the Herzing University Academic Integrity Policy.
0 pts
Level 0
The student did not submit a paper.
20 pts
Total Points: 100

Other resources to draw from:
Healthy People 2020 – www.healthypeople.gov
National Center for Health Statistics – www.cdc.gov/NCHS
National Family Caregivers Association – www.nfcacares.org
AssessNow – www.assessnow.info
Community Guide to Helping America’s Youth – www.findyouthinfo.gov
Chisagocounty.us
Healthiest Minnesota 2022
http://www.city-data.com/food/food-Chisago-Minnesota.html[supanova_question]

HW 02 Computer Foundations II and Partition Analysis Purpose: The purpose of

HW 02 Computer Foundations II and Partition Analysis

Purpose: The purpose of this assignment is to solidify your understanding of topics covered in chapters 2, 4/5 (pg 69-101), as well as GPT disk partitioning (discussed in lecture and via lecture notes). Such understanding is gained through practice.

Instructions: Answer the following questions on a separate sheet of paper (typed or hand-written), numbering all answers and showing all work for full credit.

Answer the two questions below regarding data structures and endian ordering using Figure 1 below.

Figure 1.

Suppose you were told that the horizontal resolution of a digital photograph taken is stored as a 16bit number at offset 434. Suppose you were told that the file format dictates big endian ordering. What is the horizontal resolution of the digital photograph in hex and decimal?

Again, suppose you were told that the horizontal resolution of a digital photograph taken is stored as a 16bit number at offset 434. But this time, suppose you were told that the processor is Intel x86 and that the file format does not “trump” the normal little endian ordering that would then be presumed. What is the horizontal resolution of the digital photograph in hex and decimal?

What if you were told that the horizontal resolution is stored as a 32bit number, presuming big endian ordering? What is the resolution in hex and decimal?

What if you were told that the horizontal resolution is stored as a 32bit number, presuming little endian ordering? What is the resolution in hex and decimal?

Answer the following questions considering the MBR shown in Figure 2.

Recreate and fill-in the following table:

Partiton

Type Hexcode

Type

Active Hexcode

Bootable? (Y/N)

Starting Sector (Hex)

Starting Sector (decimal)

Size in Sectors (Hex)

Size in Sectors (decimal)

1

2

3

4

b. What would you do to calculate the size of each partition in bytes?

c. Estimate how big this hard drive is (i.e. 80GB, 100GB, 160GB, etc).

d. What does the line shown separating “row 496” and “row 512” represent?

Figure 2.[supanova_question]

Homework /Reading Journal Make a generalization or claim about some aspect of

Writing about Chisago County, Minnesota. Nursing diagnosis to focus on healthy weights related to mental health issues, food insecurities, Essay Homework /Reading Journal

Make a generalization or claim about some aspect of A Midsummer Night’s Dream (character, plot, language, etc.).

Provide 3 quotes from throughout the play that would support such a claim. (Use quotation marks & give page numbers for all quotes. Again, quotes should be from throughout the play, not the same or nearby pages.) For example, if you make a judgment about a particular character, you need to provide evidence to support such an assessment.

Provide context for the quote when introducing it; provide a brief analysis following the quote.

Assignment should be no longer than one page.[supanova_question]

HW Chapter 4 Exhibit 4-2 in your book includes the Dimensions of

HW Chapter 4

Exhibit 4-2 in your book includes the Dimensions of Data Collection Design. For your research project, you will be discussing this same table as it related to YOUR research. In preparation for that activity, please do the following:

Instructions:

1) Using your book, define each key term in BOLD in the RIGHT COLUMN and give an example of what it might look like in your own research study.

2) Referring to the Student Example (Tori Young research project), what did you think about how she (Tori Young) explained her own research in her Dimensions of Data Collection Table (in her appendices)? Were her explanations clear? If not, what could you have added to make her explanation clearer?

Objective of the study

DESCRIPTIVE STUDY

REPORTING STUDY

Researcher’s ability to manipulate variables

EX POST FACTO

Topical Scope

STATISTICAL

Measurement Emphasis

QUANTITATIVE

QUALITATIVE

Complexity

SINGLE METHOD

Method of Data Collection

COMMUNICATION STUDY

Research Environment

FIELD SETTING

Time Dimension

CROSS-SECTIONAL

Participant’s Awareness

NO DEVIATIONS

Chapter 5

Instructions – Answer the following questions based on Chapter 5 readings.

1) What is the difference between Probability Sampling versus Non-Probability Sampling?

2) Define any 2 of the following types of Probability Sampling Designs (Simple Random, Systematic, Stratified, Cluster, Double) and provide an example of HOW you would do that type of sampling in a fictitious research study.

3) What is “snowball sampling”? Define it/explain it? What are the advantages and disadvantages of snowball sampling?

4) Using the student example (Tori Young research report) what kind of Sampling did she use in her research project? Do you think you might use the same type of sampling design in YOUR research project? Why or why not?[supanova_question]

Despite the comprehensive background investigation and other pre-employment screening requirements, corruption is

Despite the comprehensive background investigation and other pre-employment screening requirements, corruption is still a significant problem in corrections, particularly among correctional officers.

In your initial post, discuss at least three factors that may contribute to, or cause, a correctional officer to partake in one or more acts of corruption? Conclude your response by identifying at least three strategies that correctional leaders can implement to minimize corruption among correctional officers.

If you agree with a classmate’s recommended approaches, expand upon the points they made concerning why these approaches would effectively reduce workplace corruption. If you disagree, respectfully highlight the reasons why you believe these approaches would not be effective.[supanova_question]

Q2. The following ciphertext was produced using the Caesar cipher, but the

Q2.  The following ciphertext was produced using the Caesar cipher, but the shift factor is some number other than 3:

RAGD EOADQ MZP EQHQZ KQMDE MSA

Note: Spaces are unchanged.

Use a brute-force attack to decrypt the message.
Hint: It is written in English – this will help eliminate most attempts early in the process. Do not use any software – you should be able to easily do this manually.

Show the plaintext you recovered,
and explain the process you used to find it.

Q3.  The following ciphertext was produced using an arbitrary substitution cipher, similar to the one shown on slide 20 of the slides for Topic 2:

AVAZGLUA AUILGAK WDA HAAYAUK

Note: Spaces are unchanged.

Decrypt the message.
Hint: It is written in English.
Do not use any software – you should be able to easily do this manually.

Show the plaintext you recovered,
and explain the process you used to find it.

Q4.  The following ciphertext was produced using permutation cipher with a block size of 6 letters, and the permutation is a circular shift (rotation) of the letters in a block. The same shift factor is used in each block. Spaces were removed from the plaintext before encryption.

EWHETHSGORELNDANOUOUNDDR

Decrypt the message.
Hint: It is written in English.

Show the plaintext you recovered,
and explain the process you used to find it.

Q5.  The following is an SHA-1 hash of a message consisting of two 3-letter lowercase words from the list shown at http://www.allscrabblewords.com/3-letter-words/ ,

separated by one space. The hash was calculated at

https://passwordsgenerator.net/sha1-hash-generator/

(but any SHA-1 calculator should produce exactly the same result).

AAF8C375034DD94E2A9282E9272F797CE2F5501B

Try to find the message.
Make at least 10 attempts, unless you find it in fewer. For each attempt, show the message and the hash for it.

Q6.  How many different plaintext blocks could be encrypted using DES? Show your calculation and your result.

How many different ciphertext blocks could be decrypted using DES? Show your calculation and your result.

How many different keys could be used with DES? Show your calculation and your result.

How many attempts would it take to conduct a brute force attack on DES,
given one ciphertext block and assuming you could recognize the correct plaintext block,
and assuming you succeeded after trying exactly half the maximum number of possible values? Explain your process and show your calculation and your result.
Hint: Consider the effective key length.

7. Q7. Within each round of a Feistel cipher, there are 3 operations: – the “f” function;

– a bit-wise exclusive disjunction (XOR); – a left-right swap.

For each of these, state whether or not it needs to be invertible.
If you believe it need not be invertible, explain why;
if you believe it needs to be invertible, explain the inverse operation.[supanova_question]

1. Given that Jenner’s initial experiments began in 1796, and that enough

1. Given that Jenner’s initial experiments began in 1796, and that enough was known about the smallpox virus to change the vaccination material itself, why do you think it took until 1959 for the World Health Organization to initiate a plan for global eradication of the disease, and until 1967 for the Intensified Eradication Program to begin?

2. It wasn’t until 1980 that the World Health Assembly declared that the world was now free of smallpox. Many believe that eradication of the disease is the biggest achievement in history for the field of international public health. Do you agree or disagree, and why?

3. If smallpox were still around today, and we were just ramping up eradication efforts, do you think the efforts would be successful? Why or why not? What barriers do you think exist today that may not have existed in the 1950’s and 1960’s?

No need to write an entire chapter on each question, a paragraph is plenty (but feel free to write more if you feel the need). To keep it simple, please number each paragraph 1, 2, or 3, according to which question you are addressing at the time. Also, please respond to the post of at least one other member of the class…you can agree, disagree, add a comment, etc—just be respectful. Feel free to use any outside resources, as long as they are reputable (no Wikipedia, etc.).[supanova_question]

Supply Chain Risk and Disruption Management Discussion

I need the questions complete in 1 hour, please!
No title page
No references needed to be listed
Question: There are external risks to a supply chain that cannot be controlled by an organization nor its supply chain partners. However, these risks can be monitored, mitigated or even avoided by the organization through planning and preparation. Identify and explain 4 different types of external risk to an organization’s supply chain. For each type of external risk, provide an example of a disruption, how the disruption could impact the organization’s business and what the organization could due to mitigate the disruption.

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Data collection and answer questions

Background
The concept of morality, understanding the difference between right and wrong and guiding one’s behavior around doing what’s right and avoiding what’s wrong, has long been of keen interest to psychologists. From the early work of Piaget and Kohlberg exploring how moral reasoning changes with age, this topic has captured much attention. Clearly, this attention has grown even more as we now enter an age where “intelligentmachines” are playing a greater role in guiding and, in some cases, fully determining an individual’s behavior.
One class of intelligent machines where this issue is receiving increased focus is “self-driving” or autonomous vehicles (AVs). All major automobile manufacturers are now offering features to assist drivers in the operation of their vehicles. These range from proximity sensors to automatic parking systems to lane-guidance alerts/corrections. In fact, some current automobiles go a step further, monitoring the times the driver strays from their driving lane and sending an alert suggesting the driver should stop for some rest soon – even providing navigational help to find a nearby rest area.
The ultimate goal appears to be a fully AV, one where all basic operations as well as critical driving decisions are made by the car. Most decisions a driver makes are based on agreed-upon rules of the road (e.g., stopping for a red light, keeping a safe distance from the car in front, parking between marked lines, obeying the speed limit, etc.). Knowledgeof these rules are universally required to obtain (and keep!) a driver’s license. However, there are other driving decisions that are not “rules-based.” Sometimes drivers must make split-second decisions where the life of the driver, their passenger(s), other drivers, and/or pedestrians may be in play. For example, if you are driving at night along a tree-lined road and see a person in the road ahead of you that you cannot avoid hitting, what do you do? Do you swerve off the road risking your life by hitting a tree and/or going over an embankment – or stay the course and save yourself but risk the pedestrian’s life by driving directly into them? These are situations that require you to make a moral decisionabout the value of lives in the context of a situation they may involve many variables. Some examples:
• The pedestrian is a child.
• You have your spouse in the car with you.
• A friend is in the car with you.
• You have your spouse and your two children in the car with you.
• The pedestrian is an old man.
• There are three pedestrians in the road.
• You are an elderly driver.
• You have your grandparents in the car with you.
The list of such variables is long – even longer when you consider combinations. Andthere is research suggesting responses to these variations are different for people fromvarious cultural, ethnic and socioeconomic backgrounds.
A key advantage of AVs is that they will be able to react to critical, life-threateningdriving situations in a split second – much faster than vehicles under human control, regardless of the level of attentiveness of the driver. Because of this, it is likely thatdecision choices will need to be “programmed” into the AV. In cases like the swerve-or-stay situation above, the programming may have to make a moral judgment about the value of lives of people involved. Realistically, the programming should follow some moral code that society agrees is the best option. However, is there such a “universalmoral code” that all AVs should be programmed to follow? And, if not, who should be responsible for determining the “proper” moral code for a specific situation? Research suggests that this intersection of AVs with what is right and wrong behavior in a driving accident involving potential personal injury and/or death will be one of the mostchallenging in the path to making fully AVs a reality.
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Simple Question

In this assignment, you are going to write a narrative paragraph about important changes in your life. As you prepare your paragraph, think about the Unit Question, “Is the world changing too fast?” Write about the topic below for your paragraph:
Write a paragraph about two important changes in your life due to technology. How is your life different now with the technology? When did these changes happen? What effects do these changes have on your life?
Instructions
You must use 6 of the accompanying words in the paragraph (use the highlighter)
Grammar must be used in at least three sentences (use highlighter)
The paragraph should consist of 11 useful sentences (writing in the form of an article or paragraph)
Avoid plagiarism from any source and write from your imagination, taking into account the specified conditions
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A monopoly occurs when there are barriers entering the market

Q1 A monopoly occurs when there are barriers entering the market. List 3 types of these barriers with explanation and example
Q2 . Explain the effects of low price-guarantee on the price
Q3 . Give reasons, when average cost increases as the total output increases for an increasing cost industry.
Q4 “Why do industries like electricity or cable TV have just one or two major firms while other industries like restaurants or clothes have hundreds or thousands? What might be a general difference that leads to some industries having many firms while others are dominated by just one or two?”

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International Economics Question

Turnitin®This assignment will be submitted to Turnitin®.InstructionsEconomic Analysis Assignment
This assignment requires you to study a country of your choice and perform a macroeconomic analysis.
Information used in this written assignment must be appropriately cited in APA format. Lack of citations and / or a bibliography can be considered a form of plagiarism and will be penalized accordingly.
For the past five years, describe the countries relative economic performance in terms of:GDP (Gross Domestic Product) Growth
Inflation
Unemployment
Other characteristics and parameters you consider important as relevant to the country’s future economic prospects, e.g.,:Political institutions and stability
Distribution of economic benefits (i.e., Gini Coefficient)
Natural resources
Currency management
Percentage of GDP that is government-driven
Ease of doing business
Economic Freedom

Based on the information collected and analyzed above, discuss of the country’s relative prospects for economic growth in the next five years, and whether you would advise a business to choose it for the purposes of manufacturing a product, delivering a service, or selling to the local market.

NOTE: A sample project is provided for your guidance under “Attachments” below.I WILL UPLOAD A DOUCMENT SAME AS THE PROFESSOR NEEDS THIS ONE TO BE.
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Writing about Chisago County, Minnesota. Nursing diagnosis to focus on healthy weights related to mental health issues, food insecurities, Essay

Writing about Chisago County, Minnesota. Nursing diagnosis to focus on healthy weights related to mental health issues, food insecurities, Essay

Give an example of a clinical problem that would be best study with a quantitative approach and one that Essay

Give an example of a clinical problem that would be best study with a quantitative approach and one that Essay. Give an example of a clinical problem that would be best study with a quantitative approach and one that Essay.

Give an example of a clinical problem that would be best study with a quantitative approach and one that is best study with the qualitative approach. What makes the method appropriate and each case? How could a combination of each within one study be useful as evidence for nursing practice?

If needed for reference the book the we use is called
“Foundations of Nursing Research” 7th Edition
By Rose Marie Nieswiadomy
And Catherine Bailey
IBSN 13:978-0-13-416721-3[supanova_question]

Blue class Susan B . War paper INDENET FIRST WORD IN PARAGRAPH.

Blue class

Susan B .

War paper

INDENET FIRST WORD IN PARAGRAPH. – Wars seem to be inevitable events in history, when we hear about war we only think of tragedy. The Vietnam War era brought a lot of changes in many aspects,changing ourlives forever. The United States involvement played a huge role in the Vietnam War; and still today it remains one of the most memorable conflicts in history. A lot of survivors are still alive and their stories willlive forever. This era also shows us that positive things can come out of these tragic events such as people’s creativities. Many famous musicians came out during the era of the Vietnam War. YES

One of the greatest musicians was Joan Baez. YES Joan Baez is a folk singer from Staten Island New York. She is of Mexican and Scottish decent.She became known after performing at the 1959 Newport folk festival. Her songs are known for promoting social justice, civil rights and pacifism. According to biography.com she became a crucial part of folk music genre’s commercial rebirth in the 1960s. Some of her famous songs during the Vietnam War era were, “Saigon Bride”, “We Shall Overcome” and “Oh Freedom”. “Saigon Bride” tellsthe story of a soldier who leaves behind his bride to go to war(Shadowpoof). NEED PERSONS NAME LIKE U DID IN WORKS CITED PAGE. – -Some heart touching lyrics of this song are “How many death men will it take to build a dike that will not break? How many children must we kill before we make the waves stand still?” This song was based on a poem sent to her by Nina Duschek. People were drawn to her songs and identified themselves with her songs becoming the curator of civil disobedience, anti war, as well as bringing positive and humane change to the world during the Vietnam war era.

Another important musician that was a huge part of this era is Bob Dylan. YES He was born to the name of Robert Allen Zimmerman in Duluth, Minnesota. His music interest was driven by the influences of early rock stars like Elvis Presley, Jerry Lee Lewis and Little Richard. In his earlier life he formed his own bands called the Golden Chords. Dylan began performing folk and country songs at local cafes in Minnesota while being in university. In 1961 one of his performances received a review from The New York Times that signed him a recording contract with Columbia Records in which he then changed his name to Dylan

Some of his most famous songs were “A Hard Rain’s a-Gonna Fall” and “Blownin’ in the wind”.These two songs defined him as a part of the 60’s protest and anti war movement (Sanjana Ray).LAST NAME ONLY – Some powerful lyrics from his song “A Hard Rain’s a-Gonna Fall” is “I saw a white ladder all covered with water I saw ten thousand talkers whose tongues were all broken I saw guns and sharp swords in the hands of young children And it’s a hard, it’s a hard, it’s a hard, and it’s a hard It’s a hard rain’s a-gonna fall.”. These meaningful lyrics describes the death and destruction caused during the Vietnam War. This song also talks about the youth of Americabeing shipped off across the ocean to fight in the Vietnam War. Dylan wrote “Blownin’ in the Wind” in under ten minutes while being in a cafe in New York. This song became known as the battle cry against war and racial discrimination. Till this day this song remains one of the most powerful songs of change.Even in recent times these songsserve a voice of speaking out against global injustice.

Amongstthe great musicians who submerged during the Vietnam War era is Pete Seeger. YES Pete Seeger was born in New York City. He is known for being an American folk musician and social activist whose music inspired many because of the outspoken lyrics about freedom and justice.His music also got him blacklisted from radio and television for years. Seeger came from a family of musicians. His songs touched the hearts of many people because the lyrics were so clear and direct giving the message that we should bring the soldiers fighting in the war back home with their families.

One of his most famous songs about the Vietnam War is “Bring em’ Home” that was released in 1966. This song was opposing American involvement in the VietnamWar from the start. The lyrics of this song are very powerful and show deep sentiment about the soldiers fighting in the war. One very powerful lyricthat makes a clear statement is “Bring em’ home, bring em’ home” which are repeated in every other line of the song. These lyrics emphasize that America should pull our military out of Vietnam. Another heart touching song is “Waist Deep in the Big Muddy”, this song puts out the message about an army patrol that almost drowns crossing a river in Louisiana in 1942. People quickly understood the allusion this has to the Vietnam War. Seeger was also recognized by winning awards. In 1994 he won The National Medal of Arts. He was also included in the Rock and Roll hall of Fame in 1996. As well as one of his biggest awards was winning his first Grammy Award for Pete in 1996 (Britannica). He was still releasing music in recent years, in 2010 he released his album called “Tomorrow’s Children” which was dedicated to environmental awareness.

Adding to the many famous musicians whose songs became the voice for anti-war movements during the Vietnam era were The Rolling Stones. YES The Rolling Stones are an English rock band formed in London on 1962. The members of the band are Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, Ronnie Wood, Charlie Watts, Brian Jones, and Bill Wayman. The forming of this band happened when Mick Jagger and Keith Richards encountered eachother at a train station in England. The two knew eachotherback in grammar school but lost touch after leaving that school. The Rolling Stones first debuted on July of 1962. They became popular in the United States in 1964 because their songs were identified with the youthful and rebellious movements of the 1960s (Wikipedia). One of their most famous songs was “Gimme Shelter”, this song was inspired by the Vietnam War. According to an article written by Alex Browne, Mick Jagger said once in an interview that the Vietnam War was a very rough and violent era, there was violence on the screens, pillage and burning. This war was not like any other war, it was the nastiest war and people were all against it. One powerful lyric of “Gimme Shelter” was “Rape, murder. It’s just a shot away. It’s just a shot away”. (BROWN) These lyrics were powerful and described all the cruel deaths that happened during the Vietnam war.

Lastly another well known musician during this era was Arlo Guthrie. YES Arlo Guthrie is an American folk singer and songwriter. He was born in Brooklyn, New York to his famous father Woody Guthrie who was also a famous folk singer and songwriter. Arlo Guthrie is known for singing songs that protest social injustice and storytelling. He was inspired by his father and his friends who were also musicians. He also made several appearances in acting. One of his most famous songs is “Alice’s Restaurant’s Massacree”. The creation of this song is very powerful because it was inspired by a real life incident that happened to Guthrie on Thanksgiving day of 1965. Guthrie was arrested for illegally dumping on private property after the local landfill was closed for the holiday. Later that incident Guthrie appeared in court pleading guilty to the charges that resulted in a fine and some community service.

The famous song tells the story of his incident and how his arrest prevented him from being drafted to fight in the Vietnam War and it also tells that Guthrie is unfit to service in the war (William Ruhlmann). LAST NAME ONLY – This song is also greatly known for being a long eighteen minutes and that is mostly spoken in monologue. When he first performed this song live it got him signed to Warner Bros. Records and it even entered the Billboard magazine Top LP’s chart. It also stayed in the Billboard charts for 65 weeks. This song’s success was a great deal because it was also adapted into a motion picture and he was the star of the film(William Ruhlmann). Later the movie Alice’s Restaurant premiered at the New York Film Festival on August 24, 1969.

This song was also certified platinum in 1986 as well as becoming a tradition for radios to play every year on Thanksgiving Day.

As you can see The Vietnam War era produced some of the greatest, most impactful music ever recorded. Wars seem to be inevitable events in history and when we hear the word “war” we only think of violence, tragedy and death.Besides of all this tragedy these musicians showed us that creativity can be born evenduring rough times. This era was one that brought to light many talented musicians, whose music to protest and end the war gave people hope. Some songs even accompanied the soldiers who were fighting during the Vietnam War at the time, like the songs by Joan Baez. All of these famous songs added force for people’s opposition against war and it also became a part of a wider counterculture movement.

IN YOUR CONCLUSION THE NAMES OF THE BANDS OR SINGERS AGAIN. THANKS.

B

Work Cited JUST USE YOUR TAB KEY. DO NOT USE SPACE BAR FOR ALIGHNMENT. THANKS.

Browne, Alex. “9 Of the Best Songs Associated With the Vietnam War.” History Hit, History Hit, 8 May 2019, www.historyhit.com/best-songs-associated-with-the-vietnam-war/.

The Editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica, The Editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica. “Pete Seeger.” Encyclopædia Britannica, Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc., 29 Apr. 2020, www.britannica.com/biography/Pete-Seeger.

Pelly, Liz. “Five Songs Of Resistance: The Protest Songs Of Joan Baez.” Shadowproof, 16 Jan. 2020, shadowproof.com/2017/07/01/five-songs-resistance-joan-baez/.

YOU WROTE SHADOWPROOF IN YOUR PAPER AND U WROTE PELLY HERE. THEY BOTH HAVE TO B IDENTICAL. THANKS.

Ray, Sanjana. “How Bob Dylan Changed the Course of History through His Music.” YourStory.com, Sanjana Ray, 24 May 2017, yourstory.com/2017/05/music-of-bob-dylan?utm_pageloadtype=scroll.

“The Rolling Stones.” Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, 7 May 2020, en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Rolling_Stones.

Ruhlmann, William. “Arlo Guthrie: Biography & History.” AllMusic, All Music, www.allmusic.com/artist/arlo-guthrie-mn0000927736/biography.

B

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?????introduction External Analysis 1. Porter’s Five Forces 1.1Strong Rivalry 1.1.1The number and

Give an example of a clinical problem that would be best study with a quantitative approach and one that Essay ?????introduction

External Analysis

1. Porter’s Five Forces

1.1Strong Rivalry 

1.1.1The number and size of competitors 

The Athlete Apparel Industry is a fragmented industry with Top competitors.

Competitors include Nike ?largest sport apparel brand with $39.1 billion sales in 2019), Adidas Group AG ($26.0 billion sales in 2019), Under Armour (5.3 billion sales in 2019). (Lululemon, p82)

Sports and fitness apparel market for women is also intensely competitive.

New entrants are eager in this potential incremental market.

Competitors in this market include The Gap (acquired Athleta with $150 million in 2008), Nordstrom (introducing its own Zella line for workouts) and Victoria Secrets (offering sports brand items).?Lululemon, p83)

1.1.2 Medium-High degree of Industry Product Standardization

Except for Lululemon, their competitors’ prices are close.

Athleta, Zella and Victoria Secrets’ collections are generally 10% to 25% lower than that of lululemon products of the same type. Nike, Under Armour, and Adidas’s selling prices are less expensive than lululemon’s similar items. (Lululemon, p83)

The technology and design that lululemon is proud of will continue to be indifferent from other brands.

1.1.3 Low degree of switching costs

1.1.4 Medium-High Growth in demand for products

The Sports and fitness apparel market was forecast to grow at roughly five percent annually through 2026. (Lululemon, p74)

Yoga practitioners are increasing, from 15.8 million in 2008 to 36.7 million in 2015. (Lululemon, p74)

1.2 Weak to Moderate Buyer Power

1.2.1 Medium-Low Buyer Bargaining Power

Low buyer switching costs

Medium-Low buyer concentration

Lululemon’s products sold mainly through their company-operated retail store and website, accounted for 91.4 percent of company revenues. (Lululemon, p70)

Dissimilarly, Lululemon’s competitors sell through different channels including independent distributors, third-party retailers, franchisers,wholesalers, etc.

Medium possibility of buyer backward integration

Number of national and regional retailers seeking to capitalize are selling high-tech fabric activewear under their own labels. (Lululemon, p83)

1.2.2 Medium Buyer Price Sensitivity

Suppliers’ products sold at a discount

Approximately 95 percent of the merchandise in lululemon stores was sold at full price, the excesses are shipped to Factory outlets with discounted prices. (Lululemon, p77)

Other companies, however, do not follow the same discipline as Lululemon. For instance, Under Armour operated 104 factory outlet stores. (Lululemon, p83)

Product Is not a Significant Proportion Of Consumer’s Costs

Product doesn’t affect consumers’ performance very much

Product doesn’t save customer’s money

1.3 Weak Supplier Power

1.3.1Concentration and size of Suppliers

The number of suppliers is larger than buyers in the Athletic Apparel industry since most companies choose to outsource their production process.

Lululemon’s fabrics were sourced from approximately 76 fabric manufacturers; garments were sourced from approximately 39 manufacturers. (Lululemon, p80)

1.3.2 Low Difficulty of Switching Suppliers

Lululemon refrained from long-term contracts and preferred an order-by-order basis business. (Lululemon, p80)

1.3.3 Medium-Low Possibility of Supplier Forward Integration

 Covid-19 has provided manufacturers from different countries an opportunity to contact consumers directly.

1.4 Moderate to Strong Threat of New Entrants

1.4.1 Medium Incumbent Firms’ Cost Advantages

Investment in plant and machinery required to enter industry is needless. Most companies in this industry outsource their production.

Large size of investment in marketing needed to match incumbent brand awareness

The main competitors, Nike, Adidas and Under Armour all aggressively markets and promotes their products through sponsorship of athletic events and high-profile athletes. (Lululemon, p82)

1.4.2 Other Incumbent Firm Advantages

The existing brand has neutral influence in customer purchase decisions. This includes the network effects brought by the marketing investments.

Low switching cost for incumbents’ customers

1.4.3 Additional Considerations

As in 1.1.4, the growth rate in the athletic apparel industry is continually increasing. Thereby attracting new entrants to the battlefield. The companies with sufficient capital are able to combine their existing competitive advantage with management.

The Gap acquired Athleta at $150 million (Sufficient Capital).

Nordstorm used their retail channel to support the Zella line.

Victoria Secret used their brand awareness introducing Sport Label. (Lululemon, p84)

1.5 Weak Threat of Substitute Products

The substitute products are difficult to find or acquire. 

Athletic Apparel Market is a subdivision of the apparel market that has specific focus on functions. 

Consumers could still wear general apparel for daily workout, with a cheaper price and worse performance.

Low Customer switching costs

1.6 Conclusions: Overall Industry Attractiveness

With a Strong Competitor Rivalry, Weak to Moderate Buyer Power, Weak Supplier Power, Moderate to Strong of New Entrants, Weak Threat of Substitutes, athletic apparel industry is unattractive. 

Although the low buyer power, supplier power, irreplaceability and growing market make this industry look profitable, fierce competition and ambitious new entrants reduce this market’s attractiveness and Profitability to a minimum. For small businesses without capital, the investment in marketing by leading companies such as Nike and Adidas is unmatched and has established extremely high barriers. 

For other apparel brands, the research and development costs of new technologies, the influence and professionalism of existing brands make them only able to use sportswear as the icing on the cake, and it is difficult for them to open up new markets and win higher profits. 

2. General Environment

2.1 Complementary products or services

2.1.1 Potential complementary products/services for Lululemon:

Fitness & yoga equipment, (such as yoga MATS and other tools),

Sports nutrition & sports event apparel supplements

2.1.2 Product diversification and cross-industry cooperation

In 2020, lululemon offered a diverse and growing selection of premium-priced performance apparel and accessories for women, female youths and men that were designed for healthy lifestyle activities such as yoga, swimming, running, cycling, and general fitness. (Page75)

Every lululemon store had a community coordinator who developed a customized plan for organizing, sponsoring, and participating in local athletic, fitness, and philanthropic events. (Page80)

2.2 Technological change?Trends in new threats?

2.2.1 There are many strong competitors in similar industries

lululemon competed with direct sellers of premium performance athletic apparel made of high-tech fabrics, most especially Nike, The adidas Group AG and Under Armour. (Page82)

2.2.2 Competitors are technologically advanced and constantly innovating

Under Armour regularly upgrades its products, which are made entirely from technologically advanced, high-performance fabrics and are designed to be aesthetically appealing while providing high functionality and comfort. (Page83)

2.2.3 New Entrants into the Sports and Fitness Apparel Market for Women

Retailers responded to the growing market for women’s sports and fitness apparel by introducing brands and product lines to compete in this segment. Entrants into this segment of the apparel market included The Gap, Nordstrom, and Victoria’s Secret. (Page83)

2.3 General economic conditions

2.3.1 Instability in the economic system

In June 2020, most all chain retailers and local businesses were wrestling with the uncertainty created by the global pandemic, store closures, and the extent to which consumer buying and shopping patterns would be affected both in the short term and the long term. (Page84)

2.3.2 Unemployment rate & inflation

2.4 Population demographics?Trends in new opportunities?

2.4.1 There are a large number of female yoga practitioners around the world

Worldwide, it was estimated that there were about 300 million yoga practitioners. Group or class yoga exercises were women, and close to 62 percent of all yoga practitioners were in the age range of 18-49. (Page74)

2.4.2 Yoga-related spending is on the rise

Spending on yoga classes, yoga apparel, equipment, and accessories was an estimated $16.8 billion, up from $10.3 billion in 2012, and $5.7 billion in 2008. (Page74)

2.4.3 The size of the sportswear market is growing steadily

The global market for all types of sportswear, activewear, and athletic apparel was estimated to be about $250 bil1ion in 2020 and was forecast to grow at roughly five percent annually through 2026. Sales of various types of sports apparel was among the fastest-growing segments in the $3 trillion. (Page74)

2.5 Ecological/natural environment?Trends in new threats?

2.5.1 Sustainable raw materials

2.5.2 The recycling of pollution caused by manufacturing and new energy production models

2.6 Global competitive forces?Trends in new opportunities?

2.61 The changeability of store space

The floor space allocated to merchandising displays and customer shopping could be sufficiently cleared to enable the store to hold an in-store yoga class before or after regular shopping hours. (Page77)

2.6.2 Continuous improvement of the e-commerce system

The company planned to continue to develop and enhance its e-commerce websites in ways that would provide a distinctive online shopping experience and strengthen its brand reputation. With e-commerce sales climbing from $106.3 million in fiscal 2011 to $1.14 billion in fiscal 2019,28.6 percent of total revenues. (Page79)

2.6.3 Shorter product development cycles

Typically, it took 8 to 10 months for lululemon products to move from the design stage to availability in its retail stores; however, the company had the capability to bring select new products to market in as little as two months. (Page79)

2.6.4 Regular market research and analysis

Design team members regularly visited retail stores in CL proactive effort to solicit feedback on existing products from store customers and fitness ambassadors and to gather their ideas for product improvements and new products. (Page79)

2.7 Political, legal, and regulatory force

2.7.1 Quality and ethical business conduct

All manufacturers were required to adhere to a vendor code of ethics regarding quality of manufacturing, working conditions, environmental responsibility, fair wage practices, and compliance with child labor laws, among others. (Page80)

2.7.2Monitor supplier business practices

lululemon utilized the services of a leading inspection and verification firm to closely monitor each supplier’s compliance with applicable law, lululemon’s vendor code of ethics, and other business practices that could reflect badly on lululemon’s choice of suppliers. (Page79)

2.8 Social/cultural forces?Trends in new opportunities)

2.8.1 A culture in which people yearn for a healthy life

lululemon executives sought to promote and ingrain a set of core values centered on developing the highest-quality products, operating with integrity, leading a healthy balanced life, and instilling in its employees a sense of self responsibility and the value of goal setting. (Page81)

2.8.2 Entrepreneurship, including philanthropic activities

2.9 Conclusion

In conclusion, it is evident that with the improvement of people’s life quality, people pay more attention to health, and more and more people are willing to consume yoga-related products. This is an excellent opportunity for Lululemon, but Lululemon should develop more products suitable for men to gain the whole market. In addition, Lululemon has strong competitiveness in the industry by virtue of its core competitiveness. However, if Lululemon wants to continue to grow bigger and stronger, it must keep innovating while maintaining its existing advantages to improve its comprehensive competitiveness. However, Lululemon faces apparent challenges. Firstly, more and more clothing companies have started to enter the sportswear business. Lululemon must keep its production technology updated literally. Otherwise, it will be easily defeated by competitors. Lululemon needs to explore greener raw materials and production methods so it does not become obsolete while maintaining the legality and ethics of its manufacturing operations. Finally, and more importantly, it is impossible to predict the future of the economy, as Lululemon is doing with its e-commerce business, which will help keep it going when natural disasters strike

Internal Analysis

3. Financial Analysis

3.1 Balance Sheet

3.2 Income Statement

3.3 Selected Key Ratios 

3.4 Common Size Balance Sheet

3.5 Conclusion:

To conclude, by analyzing the Profitability of Lululemon, we can find that the company had a relatively stable growth trend. The Operating Profit Margin has increased from 17.9% to 22.3% in the past five years by about 20%, which indicates that Lululemon’s merchandise sales provide high Operating Profit and reflect the company’s strong profitability. In addition, through analysis of Efficiency Ratios trend, We found that Lululemon’s Inventory Turnover began to decline significantly in the last five years, and  the total assets turnover experienced significant fluctuations in the previous five years, which was a very unhealthy signal. There was a risk that lululemon would not have enough liquidity to execute its strategy. Lululemon’s top management should have conducted an in-depth analysis of its production chain and increased the production of popular products to significantly increase the number of products sold and thus improve inventory turnover. In addition, unsalable products stored in the warehouse date for a long time can adopt discount sales and other means, timely processing.

According to the financial data analysis of 2019, the virus-related impact also had a particular impact on Lululemon’s performance. Lululemon had to implement plans such as closing stores or reducing business hours to cope with emergencies. Lululemon’s Total Liabilities grew 47%. Lululemon should stick to its plan to enhance its e-commerce site, which not only enhances the shopping experience for consumers but also has an effective solution for unexpected situations, and it’s proven to be so; the e-commerce sales climbed from $106.3 million in fiscal 2011 to $1.14 billion in fiscal 2019 Annual Growth rate of 34.5 percent)

From the overall financial reporting data, Lululemon is in a relatively healthy position, with the company maintaining a steady increase in sales, but there is robust global competition in the sports and fitness apparel market. There are established companies that are expanding their high-performance product lines and new entrants attracted by growth opportunities. Lululemon should reduce costs of goods sold and operating expenses, while ensuring its advantages in product quality, performance features, brand image and awareness to expand its Market Share. Nike had global sales of $39.1 billion in 2019, while Adidas had global sales of $26 billion in the same year. Meanwhile, Gap bought Athleta for $150 million in 2008, also joining the sports and fitness apparel market competition. Lululemon needs to reduce operating expenses and cost of goods sold scientifically and reasonably through efficient internal management to achieve higher revenue, which is used for continuous investment in efficient internal management, product design, technology upgrading and other aspects to improve its core competitiveness.

4. Competitive Advantage and VRIO

4.1 Resources

4.1.1 Physical Store Resources:

Lululemon has 491 stores in 17 countries. (P 76) That making it possible for Lululemon customers to buy products worldwide thanks to its store expansion strategy. This is something that many new and existing competitors will not be able to emulate in a short time.  In addition, the multi-country store expansion strategy helps Lululemon increase international brand awareness in the customer’s mind.

Is the resource Valuable?

Is the resources Rare?

Is the resource Inimitable?

Is the company organized to exploit?

 

Yes

No

No

Yes

Competitive Advantages

 

4.1.2 Human resource:

Lululemon’s management team is all influential people in the retail field, such as Christine M. Day and Robert Meers mentioned in the case. Although they have left Lululemon in the process of development, they all contribute a lot of value to Lululemon (P70)

Is the resource Valuable?

Is the resources Rare?

Is the resource Inimitable?

Is the company organized to exploit?

 

Yes

No

Yes

Yes

Durable Competitive Advantages

4.1.3 Business partners:

Lululemon has close working relationships with commercial partners, such as Manufacturers, Fabric suppliers. (P 80) These resources have enabled Lululemon to achieve a more efficient, high-quality, and differentiated growth strategy.

Is the resource Valuable?

Is the resources Rare?

Is the resource Inimitable?

Is the company organized to exploit?

 

Yes

No

No

Yes

Competitive Advantages

 

4.1.4 Lululemon community: 

Lululemon recruits professional yoga instructors to provide customers with free yoga classes and knowledge, and Customer-centric selling has brought customers closer to Lululemon, and customers have become loyal and improved brand awareness.

Is the resource Valuable?

Is the resources Rare?

Is the resource Inimitable?

Is the company organized to exploit?

 

Yes

Yes

No

Yes

Durable Competitive Advantages

 

4.2 Capabilities

4.2.1 Inbound Logistics:

Lululemon leases, owns, or co-operates distribution centers in the United States, Canada, Australia, China, and the Netherlands, providing a steady flow of new inventory to stores worldwide (P 80). Multiple distribution centers were established to meet store expansion strategies in multiple countries, which provided fast shipping channels and a steady flow of inventory to stores in countries around the world.

Is the resource Valuable?

Is the resources Rare?

Is the resource Inimitable?

Is the company organized to exploit?

 

Yes

No

Yes

Yes

Durable Competitive Advantages

4.2.2 Marketing and sales:

Lululemon’s stores are located mainly in street locations and upscale strip shopping centers. According to the data provided by Lululemon, it achieved sales per square foot of $1,657, which is a suitable date in the retail industry. (P 76, 77) In addition, Lululemon completed 1.4billion online sales business in 2020 (P 78); these figures prove Lululemon’s ability in marketing and sales

These sales capabilities provide a capability for Lululemon in two critical ways: 1. their online sales success means they can withstand force majeure effects such as COVID-19; 2. due to the expansion of sales volume, the cost of material will be reduced to reach out the point of cost advantage.

Is the resource Valuable?

Is the resources Rare?

Is the resource Inimitable?

Is the company organized to exploit?

 

Yes

No

No

Yes

Competitive Advantages

 

4.2.3 Store Operation Capability:

Lululemon’s success can’t be achieved without the store’s operation strategy. They provide customers with a shopping experience by training sales staff and providing yoga classes by recruiting some well-known fitness instructors, which can be an added value for customers. In addition, the stores can quickly collect feedback from customers to improve the speed of product iteration.

Is the resource Valuable?

Is the resources Rare?

Is the resource Inimitable?

Is the company organized to exploit?

 

Yes

No

No

Yes

Competitive Advantages

 

4.3. Priorities

4.3.1 Product Innovation:

Product innovation is one of Lululemon’s 5-year strategic plans mentioned in 2019, and it uses the “science of Feel ™” approach to achieve disruptive innovation and deliver apparel with new features. (P 78) This strategy helps Lululemon strengthen its market share and position in its core apparel business. 

4.3.2 Omni Guest Experience: 

“An experiential brand” is Lululemon’s goal so that Lululemon will provide service and experience to customers through multiple channels, including the buying experience, after-sales experience, and Lululemon’s community service experience. (P 78) Through the Omni Guest Experience, Lululemon’s customers become more loyal, and consumers become more aware of the Lululemon brand.

4.3.3. Store expansion:

China will be the next end zone for Lululemon, with plans to open more stores in Central Europe. New Zealand, France, Germany, and some other countries will also open new stores. (P 78)

4.4 Conclusion

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In Summary, Lululemon has a significant advantage in-store and community operations, where customers can enjoy added value beyond clothing purchases. In addition, Lululemon’s business partnerships provide it with the advantage of quick insight into market changes and iterative products. Each brand has some weak points, and Lululemon has less international brand presence than its competitors, such as Nike, Adidas, etc. As mentioned in the strategy in the priorities, store expansion is addressing the issue of international presence.

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5. Current and Generic Strategy

5.1 Business Mission

Lululemon’s core mission is to create components for people to live healthier lives.

Lululemon’s primary target customer is a sophisticated and educated woman who understands the importance of a healthy lifestyle.(lululemon,P74).

5.2 Current Strategy 

5.2.1 “Power of Three” Strategic Plan 

Product Innovation

Adopt the method of Science of Feetm to emphasize the use of fabric and that provided better performance and comfort.

Introduce new products with innovative functions.

Expand the company’s business (office/travel/Commute line) (lululemon,P75?

Omni Guest Experience 

The company establishes a good relationship with customers to bring           customers an all-round VIP experience.

Partnership with local yoga clubs and unique store formats.(lululemon,P75)

Continuing to Add lululemon Retail Store in Both Its Core North America Market and Internationally.

Expand international retail stores.

China was the company’s primary focus outside North America. (lululemon,P75)

5.2.2Product Line Strategy

Provide customers with diversified high-performance clothes, specially designed for yoga, swimming, running, cycling and general healthy lifestyle activities.

Offering only a limited range of appeal size(lululemon did not offer clothing in plus-size) (lululemon,P75)

5.2.3 Retail Distribution and Store Expansion Strategy

Lululemon had 491 company-operated stores in 17 countries.

Either acquire the franchisee’s existing store and operate it as a company store, or convert the franchise store 1,) a joint venture arrangement in which lululemon has a controlling stake in the store, while the former franchisee has a minority stake.

Focusing on expansion of the retail square footage and opening the new company-operated store.

Mainly located in streets, shopping centers and malls. (Lululemon, P76)

5.2.4 Merchandise strategy 

Full price in retail stores.

Offering special and seasonal items in a limited time period.

The cycle time of the product is usually 3, 6 or 12 weeks, so that the customer will always find new products in retail stores.

Offering free yoga classes once a week in every retail store and a 15% discount coupon will be offered after yoga classes.

Over inventories will ship to factory Outlet stores in North America and sold at a discount price. (lululemon, P77)

5.2.5 Showroom Strategy 

Opened many showrooms to introduce their brand and culture to different communities.

Making connections with people who like fitness(potential customers).

Offering classes and information about yoga. (lululemon, P77)

5.2.6 Direct-to-Customer Sale Strategy 

Provide an online shopping method. 

More convenient shopping method for customers who are living in an area without a retail store.

Increase brand awareness.

Offering online buyers different products compared in retail stores. (lululemon,P78)

5.2.7 Product Design and Development Strategy 

Innovative fabrics are used to give lululemon garments such characteristics as stretching ability, moisture wicking ability, color fastness, feel-good comfort and durability.

The product is designed with convenient functions (pocket for storing items and long sleeves that cover both hands).

Short delivery time in the market.

A series of tests were performed on the fabric, including performance characteristics such as pilling, shrinkage, abrasion resistance and color fastness before the product is introduced to the market. (Lululemon, P79)

5.2.8 Community Based Marketing Approach and Brand-Building Strategy 

Elected a yoga ambassador to provide free yoga classes once a week in every retail store and they will wear Logo t-shirts to help promote the brand.

Rarely use traditional advertising but prefer to rely on its community promotion.

Each store has a community event board and a black board. They will post up-coming events and information on the community event board. The black board is for customers to write down the comments or feedback for the lululemon. (lululemon,P80).

Strategic Issue

Is Lululemon competitive enough among the apparel market?

Lululemon should improve its competitive strategies to make it more competitive among its rivals in the apparel market. First of all, in terms of the product line strategy, there were about 300 million yoga practitioners but most such products were sized XS to XL and everyone has different figures. Lululemon needs to offer clothes with larger sizes to satisfy more customers’ requirements although focusing on sizes 12 and below was an integral part of its business strategy. (5.2.2 Production line strategy) Besides, Lululemon can open more Lululemon industry Outlets outside of North America to sell excess inventories and raise buyer concentration that Lululemon’s competitors sell through different channels including independent distributors, third-party retailers, franchisers, wholesalers, etc. (1.2.1 Medium-Low Buyer Bargaining Power) Moreover, if Lululemon has opportunities to own the trademark for the fabric, its products will be harder to inimitable and increase competitive advantages. (4.2.3 Inimitability) There are more and more companies entering into the apparel industry with high-advanced technology, so Lululemon has to update its system and technology management regularly to avoid being replaced in the future. (2.2.2 Competitors are technologically advanced and constantly innovating) Finally, Lululemon is suggested to explore greener raw materials and production methods to increase its goodwill so it does not become obsolete while maintaining the legality and ethics of its manufacturing operations. (2.7.1 Quality and ethical business conduct)[supanova_question]

Requirements: Here are the text requirements Minimum 800 words Maximum 2,000 essay

Requirements: Here are the text requirements

Minimum 800 words

Maximum 2,000

essay topic: Explain the impact of COVID-19 on Foreclosures in the US residential housing market

Please describe how COVID-19 has affected the Foreclosure housing market in the U.S. Please reference specific issues such as: How has COVID-19 affected homeowners facing foreclosure? Are the moratoriums on foreclosures helping or just delaying the inevitable? How has the auction process changed in response to the pandemic? Will there be opportunities for home buyers and investors in 2021 from a possible crash, and how will it be different from the housing crash of 2007- 2008. Include reference page for any text cited.[supanova_question]

Topic Options: For your submission, please write an essay of (1,500 to

Topic Options: For your submission, please write an essay of (1,500 to 2,500 words) about the topic listed below:

What is the overall carbon footprint of electric mowers (trimmers, blowers, tractors or other related equipment for garden) in comparison to their petroleum-powered counterparts?

Submissions should be creative, engaging, and thought-provoking. We want to see logical arguments that challenge us to think about the issues at hand. Essays should be grammatically correct and be free of typos.

All submissions should be wholly original works. Students may share information from any source, but it should be written in their own words with sources cited ,both in text and references page, when referring to a specific study or quote.

Essay format should be in APA 7.[supanova_question]

Essay: Ultimate Reality and the Meaning of Life Answer ONE of the

Essay: Ultimate Reality and the Meaning of Life

Answer ONE of the questions given below in an essay. Try to be concise and clear.

You must include your approach on ultimate reality and the meaning of life, and you must show where you agree or disagree with the other approaches you discuss, and why.

You must explain (not just mention) FIVE specific approaches with AT LEAST ONE from each of the three main parts of the course:

Part II: Western monotheism Part III: non-theistic western Part IV: Buddhism

An “approach” is somewhat more general than just an “idea”. Approaches are the main things we looked at and are generally but not always associated with specific people as the main point they are making. Occasional objections are not themselves approaches (e.g. Bertrand Russell’s objections to the cosmological argument are not “approaches”, but they were “ideas”). Each short story can be considered one approach. Buddhism contains many particular parts so you can consider various aspects in each module to be different “approaches” for this purpose. Think of the approaches as the well-developed views given to try to answer questions about reality or meaning. Be sure that the approaches you discuss are not too similar (e.g. Sartre and Camus are too similar). If in doubt email the professor ahead of time to confirm that your “approaches” will count.

The rubrics are:

Do you give and explain (not just mention) at least FIVE relevant and specific approaches from our class?

Are your explanations of these approaches accurate?

Did you give good reasons and evaluations, including how your view compares and/or why your view is better?

Did you clearly explain YOUR view of meaning and reality?

The Specific Questions (Identify at top of your essay as “A”, “B”, or “C”). Choose the essay that will best enable you to explain your view in relation to the topic given. Be sure to keep your focus on the particular theme in the question. You must choose relevant specific approaches for each question. Not all approaches are appropriate for all questions!

Note: for all three questions “meaningful life” should be understood to include the Buddhist conception(s) of Nirvana, and in general be understood broadly to include purpose & fulfillment.

A: This question has two main aspects, but the first aspect is more important:

Choose one of the main topics we considered regarding ultimate reality: either the existence of God or non-self in Buddhism. Give your analysis of reasoning for or against it, and defend your conclusion about the correct view of the matter. This should involve assessing three “approaches” to the existence of God (from II-b, II-c, or II-d) or non-self (from IV-b or IV-c). [Note: do not discuss approaches to meaning of life here!]

Then assess the effect of the conclusion you make on two approaches in other parts of the course – that is, if you write on God, assess its effect on something from part III (non- theistic) and something from part IV (Buddhism), and if you write on non-self, assess its effect on something from part II (God) and something from part III (non-theistic). To “assess its effect” explain how it would strengthen or weaken the approaches as plausible explanations of reality or meaning. Choose approaches that highlight the effects.

B: Aristotle’s claim that human nature determines the best kind of life for us. For him, humans were essentially rational beings, so a life using reason (life of learning) was best. Throughout the course we have seen other views that are based on human nature, although not all have discussed the issue in those terms. For this question, then, consider “human nature” to mean anything about us (not about the world) that is characteristic of all human beings. Which of the approaches to human nature and meaning do you think is right, and why? Explain and assess that approach and at least four others that in some way make the meaning of life dependent on human nature.

C: Do other beings (human or otherwise) ever prevent one from having a meaningful life, or make it harder? Or is the opposite true and other beings (human or otherwise) are needed for a meaningful life? Consider your own view of a meaningful life in relation to other beings as well as some approaches we have studied that in some way relate a meaningful life for a person to their relationship with other beings (human or otherwise), either preventing or making it harder or being needed. (These relationships might not be central to those approaches but need to be an aspect of the approach.)[supanova_question]

Essay option for final exam: In place of taking the timed, online

Essay option for final exam:

In place of taking the timed, online portion of the final exam, there is an essay option. If you take this option, you do not need to take the online final, but you should not necessarily assume that it is the easy option – you are going to have to work for it.

“The Russian Government under President Putin is taking steps that are weakening the rules-based order that we have benefitted from for seven decades. Our values, our security, our prosperity, and our very way of life are tied to this order. And we – and by we, I mean the United States and our closest partners – must come together to prevent Russia from succeeding.” (Samantha Power, former US Ambassador to the UN, 2017).

Power’s speech (see Pilot) provides in summary form the standard Western narrative of Putin’s aggressive/destabilizing actions over recent years without offering any context or explanation for why Russia might have acted in such a way. Watch the two Frontline documentaries (Putin’s Revenge 1 https://www.pbs.org/video/putins-revenge-mzz1lp/) and Putin’s Revenge 2 https://www.pbs.org/video/putins-revenge-part-two-wpsiq2/

These two documentaries fall into the “standard Western narrative” category, but at least try to get at why Putin might be out for revenge.

For a different perspective:

Watch Oliver Stone’s interview with Putin (part 2 of a 4 part series), then read the four other (short) readings on Pilot. Together these provide an alternative narrative for Russia’s behavior that challenges the standard western (i.e. West = good, Russia = bad) narrative.

Then, write a minimum of 7 pages on the following:

“Relations between the US and Russia are currently worse than have been at any point during the last 30 years. Why? Is there an objective narrative that explains why relations have deteriorated to such an extent? What, if anything, can be done to improve US-Russian relations moving forward?”

If you want to get a good grade on this, I suggest:

1. Reading/watching all the materials on Pilot

2. Making it clear to me that you have done this, either through direct quotes or references to the material (if you don’t make it clear, I will assume you have not).

3. Making a strong argument (based on the available factual information). Feel free to argue whatever you choose, but take a stand, don’t sit on the fence

4. Proof the paper before submitting it

5. Papers are due in the dropbox by 5pm Sunday December 12th.[supanova_question]

Give an example of a clinical problem that would be best study with a quantitative approach and one that Essay

Give an example of a clinical problem that would be best study with a quantitative approach and one that Essay

Week 7: Grant Funding Simulated Case Study Part 1) At the beginning of your discussion response each week, please

Week 7: Grant Funding Simulated Case Study Part 1) At the beginning of your discussion response each week, please. Week 7: Grant Funding Simulated Case Study Part 1) At the beginning of your discussion response each week, please.

Week 7: Grant Funding Simulated Case Study
Part 1) At the beginning of your discussion response each week, please share your PICOT question and then respond to the discussion prompt. Please share your implementation progress and any successes, barriers, or challenges you are experiencing with your project implementation.
The second part of the collaborative discussion for this week is focused on grant funding. Investigate grant opportunities that match your scholarship interests and share what you have found with us
Have you ever applied for a grant for scholarship work?
Do you have a scholarship project idea which needs grant funding? (Dear Writer Please write one paragraph for each question)

Picot Question. In adult patients with chronic pain in an outpatient practice, does implementation of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Guidelines for Prescribing Opioids for Chronic Pain (CPG-GPO), compared to current practice, impact the rate of opioid prescriiptions written in 10 to 12 weeks?

Part 1) At the beginning of your discussion response each week, please share your PICOT question and then respond to the discussion prompt. Please share your implementation progress and any successes, barriers, or challenges you are experiencing with your project implementation.
The second part of the collaborative discussion for this week is focused on grant funding. Investigate grant opportunities that match your scholarship interests and share what you have found with us
Have you ever applied for a grant for scholarship work?
Do you have a scholarship project idea which needs grant funding?

Week 7: Grant Funding for Scholarly Work
Grant Funding for Scholarly Work Examplar (Dear writer this is an example on how to write it Part one above. “Funding Grant”)
Throughout this course in the Explore section, we will provide stories from DNP graduates who are inspiring. The story included here focuses on improving care for women with vulvodynia from a DNP Practice Scholar’s viewpoint.
Improving the Care for Women with Vulvodynia
Vulvodynia is a serious women’s health concern affecting millions of women in the United States. Many women are unable to find knowledgeable providers who treat vulvodynia, leaving women with vulvar pain disorders in the United States underserved. My DNP project was developed with the goal to improve the care for women with vulvodynia by increasing the numbers of APRNs who are comfortable and confident caring for women with vulvar pain disorders. A 19-item survey was deployed via SurveyMonkey to identify the educational needs of APRNs to care for women with vulvar disorders and determine the APRN’s level of interest in addressing this important healthcare need. In total, 597 APRNs responded during the survey period. This national survey identified that APRNs are not comfortable diagnosing and treating vulvar disorders and need further education in vulvodynia, atypical vaginal infections, and vulvar skin disorders. More important, the majority of APRNs who responded expressed an interest in learning more about these topics.
The completion of this scholarly project fueled my interest to continue working in this subspecialty area as a practicing DNP with a goal to educate other APRNs. Shortly after graduation, I applied for a grant from the National Vulvodynia Association (NVA) to receive funds to open a dedicated vulvovaginal service. This grant was awarded to S.H.E. Medical Associates in Hartford, Connecticut, and I currently serve as the director of this service. In this role, I provide gynecological services to women who suffer with vulvar pain disorders, and the service is expanding rapidly. In addition, the service serves as a site for APRN providers and students who wish to expand their skills in this subspecialty. Obtaining a DNP degree provided me with the knowledge and skill set to emerge as a provider, and nursing practice leader in the subspecialty of vulvology (Moran et al., 2017, p. 55).

Part 2) Use all of these as headings: Week 7 in NR707 – Discuss: For students in the Simulated Case Study:

Every Week begin your response with your PICOT Question for your DNP Project each week. Then use each bullet point as a heading in bold and place your response underneath. Please use this form as a Template and paste each section into the appropriate week. On week 8, upload the completed template, as a word document, containing all 8 weeks of your case study responses, as an attachment to your first response in Week 8.

Picot Question. In adult patients with chronic pain in an outpatient practice, does implementation of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Guidelines for Prescribing Opioids for Chronic Pain (CPG-GPO), compared to current practice, impact the rate of opioid prescriiptions written in 10 to 12 weeks?

Discuss best practices for implementing evidence-based practice/ guidelines with references sufficient to support best practice.
•Discuss strategies for overcoming barriers in implementing evidence-based practice with references sufficient to support strategies. (Dear Writer Please write one paragraph for each question)

Discuss your ongoing implementation progress and in meeting with staff and observation – how are addressing challenges regarding your formative evaluation and providing feedback?
What feedback are you providing to participants that are a result of your observational formative evaluation?
How is this feedback being provided?
Is additional education needed at this point? If so, how would you provide this education?
To date – what have you learned about your project and the implementation process?
Are you learning what you expected or is your experience different than anticipated?
• Describe what you are learning? (Dear Writer Please write one paragraph for each of the seven questions)

Dear Writer, Please See attached practicum form to help write the stimulated case study

[supanova_question]

Week 7: Grant Funding Simulated Case Study Part 1) At the beginning of your discussion response each week, please

Week 7: Grant Funding Simulated Case Study Part 1) At the beginning of your discussion response each week, please

Or Find on Netflix: Dick Johnson is Dead (Available streaming on Netflix)- a feature-length documentary. Write a reflection on

Or Find on Netflix: Dick Johnson is Dead (Available streaming on Netflix)- a feature-length documentary. Write a reflection on. Or Find on Netflix: Dick Johnson is Dead (Available streaming on Netflix)- a feature-length documentary. Write a reflection on.

Or Find on Netflix: Dick Johnson is Dead (Available streaming on Netflix)- a feature-length documentary.
Write a reflection on this video in which you share what you learned of value to your future role as a health care professional working with patients and their families who are facing their own death or the death of a loved one.
[supanova_question]

Extra Credit Assignment Instructions: Watch the documentary film Growing Up Poor In

Extra Credit Assignment Instructions:

Watch the documentary film Growing Up Poor In America (PBS Frontline)

Write your response in no less than 400 words.

Complete these steps:

Watch the documentary. Take notes (create notes to best answer the questions below)

Briefly summarize the film. 

What was the topic?

What evidence did producers provide to convince the audience that growing up poor in America is a social problem?

Did you find the documentary convincing?

if yes, which examples were compelling to you?

if not, what questions did the film not address or what facts do you think contradicted the film?

Which social structures does the film discuss? (i.e. institutions or organizations).

Which cultural structures does the film discuss? (i.e. groups of people and related beliefs and practices). 

Name one thing you learned about the consequences of growing up poor in America that you did not know before viewing the film.[supanova_question]

Long Beach City College-Child Development and Educational Studies CDECE 48 Advocacy Project.

Or Find on Netflix: Dick Johnson is Dead (Available streaming on Netflix)- a feature-length documentary. Write a reflection on Long Beach City College-Child Development and Educational Studies

CDECE 48

Advocacy Project.

Purpose: The purpose of your advocacy project is for you to discover what advocacy is and what types of issues are currently affecting children and families. You will have an opportunity to read and think about how all of the issues that you have learned about this semester affect young children and to identify the political, socioeconomic and educational impact that one or more of those issues has on children’s development.

Task:

Step 1: Do some reading, some re-reading and a little research:

Find out about what advocacy is and what advocates do

https://www.startearly.org/app/uploads/pdf/EarlyChildhoodAdvocacyToolkit.pdf

EC advocacy tool kit from Illinois

Read pages 6-11

https://www.naeyc.org/our-work/public-policy-advocacy

Read all about current advocacy efforts- explore this thoroughly

Go back and reflect on many of the issues we have explored this semester Issues from the “advocacy in action” sections of the text- re-read all of these advocacy case studies.

Giving an idea life- pg 232

Communicating concerns pg 248

Teaching families to be advocates- pg 277

Advocacy for ourselves- pg 95

Diane Levin A super advocate- pg 146

The need for quality, affordable infant care Pg. 71

Child abuse prevention Pg. 81

Awareness of Food allergies Pg. 84

Children save the local libraries- pg 312

Rights for children with special needs Pg. 106

Increasing the book selection in a school Pg. 159

Speaking up against stereotyping pg 166

United Nations Convention on the Rights of the child Pg. 174

Families with children who have disabilities Pg 197

Taking a stand- pg 298

Discover what educators, organizations and policy makers are doing to support children and families

Explore the links below (you can also connect to some links in the module and the text) and discover what groups and agencies are doing to support children and families now. (some links lead to pages with many organizations listed)

https://www.cappaonline.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&catid=19default&id=40child-care-advocacy-california&Itemid=97

California Child Care Advocacy Groups

https://earlyedgecalifornia.org

https://www.cacfs.org/about-us

http://www.uacf4hope.org/

ccfc@commercialfreechildhood.org

http://www.hfrp.org/

http://www.peaceeducators.org/

https://dey.org

https://www.nbcdi.org

https://child360.org/who-we-are/

Step 2: Write your paper using the following format.

Part 1: What Is Advocacy and Why is it Important?

In approximately 1 page, provide a summary of your understanding of advocacy and its importance.

describe what advocacy is, what advocates do and why advocacy is important to the field of early care and education.

Use details and clear examples from your reading. If you are quoting or paraphrasing remember to cite your source

A simple citation from the internet is simply the exact webpage in parentheses

Example: One of NAEYC’s main issues is “Ensuring that early childhood professionals are diverse, effective educators and leaders working within a compensation and recognition system that supports their excellence.”(https://www.naeyc.org/our-work/public-policy-advocacy/federal-and-state-agendas)

Part 2: What are the Current Issues?

In approximately 1 page provide a summary of advocacy efforts that support young children and families

Describe some of the political advocacy efforts designed to support young children and families

What new laws and or policies are people and organizations working to get passed?

Make sure to describe 1-3 specific efforts, where they are taking place and who is advocating

Make sure to say why or how these efforts are political in nature.

Describe some of the economic advocacy efforts designed to support young children and families

What kinds of funding changes are being proposed? Are there efforts to pay teachers more? To change the way child care is paid for? Efforts to support children and families or specific populations in some financial way?

Make sure to describe 1-3 specific efforts, where they are taking place and who is advocating

Make sure to say why or how these efforts are economic in nature.

Describe some of the educational advocacy efforts designed to support young children and families

What kinds of changes to access or content of education are being sought? Are individuals or groups wanting to change ways that young children are educated? In what ways?

Make sure to describe 1-3 specific efforts, where they are taking place and who is advocating

Make sure to say why or how these efforts are educational in nature.

Part 3: Reflection

In approximately 1 page reflect on what you have discovered and what issues are important to you

Describe your connection to advocacy- is this a new concept for you? Have you actively or passively advocated for an issue/idea before? How has your understanding of advocacy for young children and families changed through your reading? Did anything surprise you?

Describe issues related to supporting young children and families that matter to you.

What issues/efforts did you discover that are of particular importance to you and why do you think they matter?

Reflect on all you have discovered about advocacy and issues and describe what you could do next to continue to work towards becoming an effective supporter of important issues that influence the lives of children and families.

Please see the grading rubric and tips on page 3…

Criteria for Success: Your advocacy project will be evaluated by the following criteria

Written Report: 20 points possible

Exceeds Expectations: all rubric points are met- 20 points

Meets Expectations: 17-15 points

Approaches Expectations: 14-10 points

Does not meet Expectations: 9 points and below

All 3 parts of the written report are present

Each prompt is clearly answered

Political, economic and educational advocacy efforts are clearly described and categorized accurately.

The written report is thorough- Many details and examples are provided that help to explain your understanding of each prompt

Meaningful quotes from the text and other sources are included and cited.

The paper as a whole shows a strong understanding of the ideas it describes with few (if any) inconsistences or misrepresentations.

Grammar, spelling, word use, sentence structure are accurate- 5 or fewer mistakes.

The paper is formatted standardly with an appropriate heading.

Tips:

Take the time to read and research thoroughly- take notes while you are exploring the websites

Avoid overgeneralizing issues or ideas

Example: Overly general (non-specific)

Example: Specific and Detailed

The fact that preschool teachers do not get paid well is really unfair and NAEYC really wants to help people get paid better.

NAEYC recognizes that an important part of building a strong early childhood profession is working to make sure that early childhood teachers are paid well for their work. One of their stated goals is to seek the “Expanding of direct supports and loan forgiveness for current and prospective ECE teachers…” (https://www.naeyc.org/our-work/public-policy-advocacy/federal-and-state-agendas).

make sure you understand any issues or ideas you decide to write about. If you have only briefly read the information or assume that you understand something without actually reading about it, you could unintentionally end up with misrepresentations of facts.

Write a first draft of your paper… early!!! Identify where you need more detail or need to go back and re-read something.

If writing a paper feels challenging to you- connect with the LBCC success centers for support!

https://www.lbcc.edu/tutoring-and-academic-resources[supanova_question]

There is an Excel spreadsheet CLT sample mean that goes with this

There is an Excel spreadsheet CLT sample mean that goes with this document.

A cat food company has been in business for 54 years. Over that time is has been determined the average bag of cat food is 12 pounds with a standard deviation of 0.1 pounds.

Notice that this is information provided by the company from measurements, so we can use it as the population mean and population standard deviation.

Given a sample of 36 bags of cat food, what is the probability of the average weight being less than 11.8 pounds?

First it is needed to input the mean, standard deviation, and sample size into the mean – samples over 1 spreadsheet.

Mean

12

standard deviation

0.1

sample size

36

standard error

0.01667

Next, as this is less than 11.8 pounds, use the less than table.

Probability value is less than a given x

x

11.8

z score

-12.00000

P(average of sample is < x)

0.00000

Given a sample of 36 bags of cat food, what is the probability of the average weight being more than 12.1 pounds?

First it is needed to input the mean, standard deviation, and sample size into the mean – samples over 1 spreadsheet.

Mean

12

standard deviation

0.1

sample size

36

standard error

0.01667

As this is greater than, use the greater than table.

Probability value is greater than a given x

x

12.1

z score

6.00000

P(average of sample is > x)

0.00000

Given a sample of 36 bags of cat food, what is the probability of the average weight being between 11.95 and 12 pounds?

First it is needed to input the mean, standard deviation, and sample size into the mean – samples over 1 spreadsheet.

Mean

12

standard deviation

0.1

sample size

36

standard error

0.01667

As this is a range of values, use the within a range of values table.

Probability x is within a range of values for x

Upper x

12

lower x

11.95

P(lower x < average of sample < upper x)

0.49865[supanova_question]

LESSON PLAN TEMPLATE Section 1: Lesson Preparation Teacher Candidate Name: Grade Level:

LESSON PLAN TEMPLATE

Section 1: Lesson Preparation

Teacher Candidate Name:

Grade Level:

Date:

Unit/Subject:

Instructional Plan Title:

Lesson Summary and Focus:

In 2-3 sentences, summarize the lesson, identifying the central focus based on the content and skills you are teaching.

Classroom and Student Factors/Grouping:

Describe the important classroom factors (demographics and environment) and student factors (IEPs, 504s, ELLs, students with behavior concerns, gifted learners), and the effect of those factors on planning, teaching, and assessing students to facilitate learning for all students. This should be limited to 2-3 sentences and the information should inform the differentiation components of the lesson.

National/State Learning Standards:

Review national and state standards to become familiar with the standards you will be working with in the classroom environment.

Your goal in this section is to identify the standards that are the focus of the lesson being presented. Standards must address learning initiatives from one or more content areas, as well as align with the lesson’s learning targets/objectives and assessments.

Include the standards with the performance indicators and the standard language in its entirety.

Specific Learning Target(s)/Objectives:

Learning objectives are designed to identify what the teacher intends to measure in learning. These must be aligned with the standards. When creating objectives, a learner must consider the following:

Who is the audience

What action verb will be measured during instruction/assessment

What tools or conditions are being used to meet the learning

What is being assessed in the lesson must align directly to the objective created. This should not be a summary of the lesson, but a measurable statement demonstrating what the student will be assessed on at the completion of the lesson. For instance, “understand” is not measureable, but “describe” and “identify” are.

For example:

Given an unlabeled map outlining the 50 states, students will accurately label all state names.

Academic Language

In this section, include a bulleted list of the general academic vocabulary and content-specific vocabulary you need to teach. In a few sentences, describe how you will teach students those terms in the lesson.

Resources, Materials, Equipment, and Technology:

List all resources, materials, equipment, and technology you and the students will use during the lesson. As required by your instructor, add or attach copies of ALL printed and online materials at the end of this template. Include links needed for online resources.

Section 2: Instructional Planning

Anticipatory Set

Your goal in this section is to open the lesson by activating students’ prior knowledge, linking previous learning with what they will be learning in this lesson and gaining student interest for the lesson. Consider various learning preferences (movement, music, visuals) as a tool to engage interest and motivate learners for the lesson.

In a bulleted list, describe the materials and activities you will use to open the lesson. Bold any materials you will need to prepare for the lesson.

For example:

I will use a visual of the planet Earth and ask students to describe what Earth looks like.

I will record their ideas on the white board and ask more questions about the amount of water they think is on planet Earth and where the water is located.

Time Needed

Multiple Means of Representation

Learners perceive and comprehend information differently. Your goal in this section is to explain how you would present content in various ways to meet the needs of different learners. For example, you may present the material using guided notes, graphic organizers, video or other visual media, annotation tools, anchor charts, hands-on manipulatives, adaptive technologies, etc.

In a bulleted list, describe the materials you will use to differentiate instruction and how you will use these materials throughout the lesson to support learning. Bold any materials you will need to prepare for the lesson.

For example:

I will use a Venn diagram graphic organizer to teach students how to compare and contrast the two main characters in the read-aloud story.

I will model one example on the white board before allowing students to work on the Venn diagram graphic organizer with their elbow partner.

Explain how you will differentiate materials for each of the following groups:

English language learners (ELL):

Students with special needs:

Students with gifted abilities:

Early finishers (those students who finish early and may need additional resources/support):

Time Needed

Multiple Means of Engagement

Your goal for this section is to outline how you will engage students in interacting with the content and academic language. How will students explore, practice, and apply the content? For example, you may engage students through collaborative group work, Kagan cooperative learning structures, hands-on activities, structured discussions, reading and writing activities, experiments, problem solving, etc.

In a bulleted list, describe the activities you will engage students in to allow them to explore, practice, and apply the content and academic language. Bold any activities you will use in the lesson. Also, include formative questioning strategies and higher order thinking questions you might pose.

For example:

I will use a matching card activity where students will need to find a partner with a card that has an answer that matches their number sentence.

I will model one example of solving a number sentence on the white board before having students search for the matching card.

I will then have the partner who has the number sentence explain to their partner how they got the answer.

Explain how you will differentiate activities for each of the following groups:

English language learners (ELL):

Students with special needs:

Students with gifted abilities:

Early finishers (those students who finish early and may need additional resources/support):

Time Needed

Multiple Means of Expression

Learners differ in the ways they navigate a learning environment and express what they know. Your goal in this section is to explain the various ways in which your students will demonstrate what they have learned. Explain how you will provide alternative means for response, selection, and composition to accommodate all learners. Will you tier any of these products? Will you offer students choices to demonstrate mastery? This section is essentially differentiated assessment.

In a bulleted list, explain the options you will provide for your students to express their knowledge about the topic. For example, students may demonstrate their knowledge in more summative ways through a short answer or multiple-choice test, multimedia presentation, video, speech to text, website, written sentence, paragraph, essay, poster, portfolio, hands-on project, experiment, reflection, blog post, or skit. Bold the names of any summative assessments.

Students may also demonstrate their knowledge in ways that are more formative. For example, students may take part in thumbs up-thumbs middle-thumbs down, a short essay or drawing, an entrance slip or exit ticket, mini-whiteboard answers, fist to five, electronic quiz games, running records, four corners, or hand raising. Underline the names of any formative assessments.

For example:

Students will complete a one-paragraph reflection on the in-class simulation they experienced. They will be expected to write the reflection using complete sentences, proper capitalization and punctuation, and utilize an example from the simulation to demonstrate their understanding. Students will also take part in formative assessments throughout the lesson, such as thumbs up-thumbs middle-thumbs down and pair-share discussions, where you will determine if you need to re-teach or re-direct learning.

Explain if you will differentiate assessments for each of the following groups:

English language learners (ELL):

Students with special needs:

Students with gifted abilities:

Early finishers (those students who finish early and may need additional resources/support):

Time Needed

Extension Activity and/or Homework

Identify and describe any extension activities or homework tasks as appropriate. Explain how the extension activity or homework assignment supports the learning targets/objectives. As required by your instructor, attach any copies of homework at the end of this template.

Time Needed

Rationale/Reflection

After writing your complete lesson plan, explain three instructional strategies you included in your lesson and why. How do these strategies promote collaboration, communication, critical thinking, and creativity? Bold the name of the strategy.

For example:

.

Think-Pair-Share promotes engagement, communication, and collaboration because all students get a chance to share their ideas or answers. This is beneficial to students because they get to put their ideas into words, and hear and discuss the perspectives of others.[supanova_question]

Or Find on Netflix: Dick Johnson is Dead (Available streaming on Netflix)- a feature-length documentary. Write a reflection on

Or Find on Netflix: Dick Johnson is Dead (Available streaming on Netflix)- a feature-length documentary. Write a reflection on

Answer will be over 150 words or a minimum of 12 sentences for each discussion question. There will be

Answer will be over 150 words or a minimum of 12 sentences for each discussion question. There will be. Answer will be over 150 words or a minimum of 12 sentences for each discussion question. There will be.

Answer will be over 150 words or a minimum of 12 sentences for each discussion question. There will be at least six Peer-reviewed articles no more than 5 years old. There must be in-text citations and the references. Please focus on topic CAUTI- Catheter Associated Urinary Infection in short-term and long-term care, all the articles have to focus on this topic.
Discussion Question #1

Submit a summary of six of your articles on the discussion board. Discuss one strength and one weakness for each of these six articles on why the article may or may not provide sufficient evidence for your practice change (CAUTI).
Discussion Question #2
Name two different methods for evaluating evidence. Compare and contrast these two methods.[supanova_question]

you will be dealing with the Reception of a classical myth –

you will be dealing with the Reception of a classical myth – and you are to evaluate a modern version of a classical myth by means of a review. The work you are to review is Madeline Miller’s novel,

Circe.

Your review should NOT be a summary of Circe but, rather, it should give your verdict on the novel – is it good, bad, or something in between? In particular, you should pay close attention to how successful Miller is in adopting and/or adapting the material from ancient myth,and from the Odyssey in particular. This is less a question of what is ‘right’ or ‘wrong’, but how or when or if Miller does change material,has she done so with good reason and what purpose does it serve?

Your review will inevitably focus on the characterization of Circe, so

make sure you have read the novel, and also the sections of the

Odyssey where Circe appears. You are also welcome to consider other portrayals of Circe, ancient or modern. There are many other issues you may wish to discuss, for example: Circe’s relationship with the gods and/or humans; the changing characterization of Odysseus; the characterization of ‘minor’ characters like Hermes, Pasiphae, or Jason; the nature of the gods in general as portrayed in the novel; the novel’s sense of time. You might also consider whether Miller’s understanding of Circe, Odysseus, and the Odyssey impacts how you understand those characters and the ancient text. You can choose to discuss all, some or none of these issues…just some suggestions for you!

The review should be 4-5 pages in length (not including title page and

bibliography), double-spaced, and in 12-point font. I expect you to cite the novel (Circe) and poem (Odyssey) when referring to specific passages or scenes – you may use direct quotations to illustrate certain points, but keep them to a minimum (it is your Interpretation that is more important than the quote).[supanova_question]

MAN 3353 Management Manifesto Purpose: Take a position regarding your philosophy of

Answer will be over 150 words or a minimum of 12 sentences for each discussion question. There will be MAN 3353

Management Manifesto

Purpose:

Take a position regarding your philosophy of management, evaluate yourself according to criteria, and develop an action plan for improving as a manager

Genre:

Manifesto: argument or position statement

Audience:

Imagine that a potential employer asks you to define your management style or your management philosophy

Due Date:

See course schedule at the end of the syllabus

Throughout Management Theory we have learned about multiple aspects of managers’ roles within an organization. Managers are planners, motivators, and analysts in companies across the world. You have demonstrated content knowledge in quizzes and you’ve applied the theories we’ve discussed to real-world case studies. Now it’s time to use what you’ve learned to plan for your future as a manager.

This paper should include 3 sections as described below:

Management Philosophy:

The purpose of this section is to argue a position about what good management is and what good managers do. Write a personal Management Mission Statement in this section to communicate that argument. In your argument, be sure to reference theories about management (chapters 1-3 in our book) and feel free to discuss your experience working as or for a manager and how those workplace experiences helped you form your personal management philosophy.

Self-SWOT:

The purpose of this section is to evaluate your own strengths based upon the characteristics of a good manager you explained in the Management Philosophy section. This self-SWOT should ask the following questions: Everyone should be able to identify weaknesses and threats in their own management style, so be honest.

Management Action Plan:

The purpose of this section is to show how you will grow from where you are today into the type of manager you described in Part 1: Management Philosophy through an Action Plan. What are some specific activities and/or experiences that will help you develop weaker areas and maximize areas of strength before you complete the BAS program? Who are some mentors you can identify who will help you develop? How will you use the control process and incorporate feedback data to continually improve your management technique as you grow throughout the next few semesters? Develop at least three action points in your Management Action Plan.

Guidelines

You can incorporate examples and real-world experiences to illustrate your points succinctly.

Be sure to provide references for quoted or paraphrased information in APA style.

Your paper should be 6 full pages minimum. There is no maximum.

Write in professional writing style: be clear, direct, and concise. You must also use correct grammar, punctuation, spelling, and word choice.

Use section headers to mark the transition between sections.

This assignment is meant to help you apply our course concepts to your real life and your identity as a manager. But keep in mind that this is also a place to demonstrate course competency in management theory, the historical developments in management philosophy, challenges for managers, and the feedback and control cycle within strategic management. Before your final submission, do a last revision making sure you’ve shown that you understand and can apply these concepts.[supanova_question]

Project proposal: Harjas Kaur Thukral Group name- Team India Group members- Harjas

Project proposal: Harjas Kaur Thukral

Group name- Team India

Group members- Harjas Kaur Thukral, Manvi Kapoor, Nirmal Patel, Adil Khan

Our group is interested in researching representations of Residential Schools.

I, Harjas Kaur Thukral, will be looking at the topics that why Residential Schools were started in the first place andthe Survivors of the Residential Schools.

Whereas Nirmal will focus on “Indigenous culture, Religion and Spirituality affected by Residential schools and TRC” and Adil will explore Intergenerational impact on health and mental well-being on survivors of residential schools.

How it affected them-

Chronic diseases

Depression

Impact on future generation-

Resilient towards learning 

Suicidal thoughts 

Government plan to overcome the issue-

Health support program.

Lastly, Manvi will focus on Intergenerational trauma

Why were residential schools built at first?

Residential schools were created to teach and convert Indigenous teenagers so that they might be integrated into Canadian culture. The federal government began looking for a way to enroll indigenous children in schools in 1883.

Money used on Residential schools.

In 1883, the administration started with a small budget of $44,000 per year. The majority of the funds come from government cuts to other Indigenous needs. Historians believe that the cuts reflect the government’s limited financial commitment to the program. Despite the pressing need to civilize Indigenous Peoples, the government was adamant about doing so cheaply, relying mainly on churches and their followers to contribute.

Because the local schools bore a large portion of the financial burden, they attempted to pass the expenses to the parents, but with limited success. Most schools utilized the children in their care to make garments, grow vegetables, plant trees, raise food animals, and execute jobs that were important for the school’s daily operations.

As the system gained in popularity, government officials began to worry that it was becoming too expensive. The government shifted to a new financing scheme in 1892, just four years into the plan, in which schools got a fixed payment for every pupil they had (a per-capita grant). Schools that were not already in trouble began to feel the strain quickly, and many began to run severe deficits. This was bad news for everyone involved because there wasn’t enough money to renovate the building, recruit enough personnel, pay acceptable salaries, or feed the pupils adequately.

Competition in between the schools.

As a result, there was an instant push to exploit student labour to produce goods, food, and services. Furthermore, once the per-capita system was established, schools competed to attract as many students as possible to maximize their funding. Even as late as the 1950s, schools were fighting for new students, even “stealing” pupils from one another, because the more students they had, the more money they made. These disputes heightened Indigenous populations’ mistrust, fueling fears that the schools did not satisfy fundamental academic standards.

Many parents are now just refusing to send their children to religious schools. In this context, most Indigenous populations believed that the schools were violating their rights and expectations and that the government was forcibly removing their children.

The downfall of the schools.

Some government authorities were aware that the schools were not accomplishing their objectives at the start of the twentieth century. There were complaints of old facilities, fuel shortages for heating, poor and insufficient nutrition, filthy living conditions, widespread disease, and, most importantly, Indigenous students’ general dissatisfaction. Academically, the scenario was not much different, and it reflected the residential school project’s general failure. “The entire system had been sinking into a uniform mediocrity,” historian James R. Miller assessed the situation.

Their first concern was to pass on their church’s beliefs or order, not to give a proper education that would benefit students in their post-graduation lives.

Furthermore, the boundary between industrial and residential schools was blurring due to accusations that neither of them taught useful skills or trades. In 1923, the nominal distinction between the two institutions was removed, and both became residential schools.

For decades, the government has refused to address the Inuit people’s economic and social problems. When it did, it followed the same pedagogical policy it had previously employed. The Canadian government did not get more involved until 1951, when the first school in Chesterfield Inlet opened. The government feared that the Inuit people would want government aid as their revenue from fur and fishing declined. As a result, Inuit children were forced to attend residential schools or hostels, which were smaller student housing facilities.

Tragic lives of Students in Residential schools.

The government hoped that by educating the Inuit, they would be able to help themselves. Under increasing government pressure and threats, approximately 4,000 Inuit children, or 75 percent of youngsters aged 6 to 15, were enrolled in residential schools by June 1964.

The vast distances between settlements in the region compounded a sad experience for most residential school students. In the most egregious case, students in the Arctic and Sub-arctic regions were separated from their families and transported hundreds of kilometres away, never to see their parents again.

Until 1910, many so-called half-breeds, especially those who lived on or near reservations, attended industrial and boarding schools. The churches and the Department of Indian Affairs then negotiated a new arrangement. Only children from Indian Bands were allowed to attend residential schools, and management was forbidden from allowing “half-breed children into the Boarding Schools unless Indian children could not be obtained.” The Department of Indian Affairs stipulated that any half-breed children admitted to the schools would not be eligible for a grant or any portion of their maintenance or schooling expenditures. As a result, those who were allowed to enter the schools did so due to the churches’ generosity, a few parents could afford to pay the tuition.

The government’s effort to address the notion of pervasive poverty in Indigenous communities was one reason for their participation in residential schools. The government took up to 20,000 Indigenous children from their parents in the 1960s, ostensibly as a kind of welfare. Patrick Johnston developed the term “Sixties Scoop” to describe this widespread practise in his 1983 paper Native Children and the Child Welfare System. Many of these “scooped-up” children were placed with foster families who were often unsuitable for their care, and many ended up in residential schools. Others were adopted and relocated to the United States.

Diseases in Residential schools.

The residential schools have suffered countless casualties throughout the years as a result of neglect and funding problems. Students lived in overcrowded dorms and were rarely isolated while sick, making the schools vulnerable to disease epidemics. Moreover, the initial goal for forming them was entirely squandered.

Where are your sources for this assignment? That was a major requirement…

1)Pick a Group name and members of the group. (1 mark) 1/1

2)Engage ONE or ALL of the issues that the group wants to address and provide a framework to address those issues. (6 marks) 4/6 Some issues in structure of paper.

3) Provide some qualitative research using academic resources, preferably in the University of Winnipeg library or online resources. (5 marks) 0/5 No sources included in assignment

4) A portion of the Individual connection to the project. (3 marks) 2/3 Minor issues in sentence structure.

7/15[supanova_question]

College of Administration and Finance Sciences Form No 4- Internship Report Cover

College of Administration and Finance Sciences

Form No 4- Internship Report Cover Page

Student`s name:

Student`s ID #:

Training Organization:

Trainee Department:

Field Instructor Name:

Field Instructor Signature:

Course Title:

CRN:

Internship Start Date:

Internship End Date:

Academic Year/Semester:

For Instructor’s Use only

Instructor’s Name:

Total Training Hours /280

Students’ Grade: Marks Obtained /30

Level of Marks: High/Middle/Low

Academic Report Guideline(Co-op)

(please do not include this text in the final report, just follow its guidelines and use the cover page above)

The report should be submitted within two weeks after you finish your Co-op training Program.

In addition, the report should be approximately 3000 – 4000, single –spaced and consider taking the following format

General instructions for writing the final report:

The report must be written in English language.

The word limit is 3000-4000.

If the report word count is not within the required word limit, marks will be deducted.

The font size is 12, Times New Roman, justified, 1.5 space.

Main headings use font size of 16 and bold.

Add page numbers in the middle bottom of the page.

Plagiarism or copying from other sources will result in ZERO marks.

This report must be submitted on Blackboard (WORD format only) via the allocated folder.

Your work should be clearly and completely presented; marks may be reduced for poor presentation. This includes filling your information on the cover page.

Assignment will be evaluated through BB Safe Assign tool. Late submission will result in ZERO marks being awarded.

First Page

The first page should display the student’s full name, internship start and finish dates, working hours per week, company/institution name, and the cover page.

The field instructor should sign on the first page.

A Brief Executive Summary of the Internship

A one-page summary of the company/institution and a short account of the major activities carried out during the internship period.

Acknowledgment

To allow the student to express her/his thankful and gratitude to individuals (such as: field instructor, academic supervisor, colleagues…etc.) who help them in carrying out and completing her/his training journey. This part will aid the students to learn basic elements of academic writing. To express their appreciation in a concise and professional manner.

Table of Contents

Contents of the report with page numbers, list of tables, and list of figures.

Introduction

A brief of the report. The Aim of the report.

Chapter 1: Description of the company

This section should answer the following questions:

What is the full title of the company/institution?

Give a brief history of the company, full mailing address and relevant weblinks

What is the type of ownership of the company/institution?

State the main shareholders and their shares.

What is the sector that the company/institution operates in?

Specify the products and services produced and offered to its customers/clients.

Who are regarded as the customers/clients of your internship company (consider the end users, retailers, other manufacturers, employees,etc.)?

Provide an organization chart of the company, along with information on the number of employees. Provide a list of functions performed by different departments/divisions in the internship organization. Provide an overview off the production system or service procedure (what are the resources, inputs, outcomes, andconstraints?)

Provide a process chart of a major product and/or service.

The following questions can be classified as your major fit (Finance, Accounting, Ecommerce and Management).

What kind accounting/finance/IT//quality/marketing standards and principles are used in the organization?

Discuss telecommunication technologies (Database, Instant Messenger, Networking, Ecommerce tools) used in the company.

Describe the quality planning and control activities in the internship organization.

Describe the quality control activities throughout the life cycle of the product/service groups

What kind of financial analysis and decision-making methods are used by corporate treasurers and financial managers in the internship organization?

What types of marketing, selling, and human resources analysis are performed (cost system, evaluation of consumers, needs, product strategy, distribution strategy, promotional strategy)?

Chapter 2: Internship activities

This is the main body of your report. During the internship period, the focus of the training may on the following types of analysis and questions. You do not have to answer all the questions in the list: Describe your working conditions and functions, such as: Who is your supervisor (include his/her name and his/her position); other team members or co-workers and what their functions are to complement yours.

Provide a detailed description about the department(s) that the trainee did her/his training with them. Adding all sub-divisions for this department(s) if it is available. Student can add to this description a supported chart.

Detailed descriptions about all tasks and activities that the trainee did them during her/his training period.

Gained skills and how they added value to your work

Other tasks that are not related to the trainee’s major that done by her/him at the company should be included in this chapter as well.

What types of incentives did you get as a trainee to be more proactive and productive?

Describe what kind of working documents and analysis you did there and what experiences you have gained throughout yourtraining. Provide examples of your work.

A comparison between theory (things you have learned in the classroom) and practice (things you did or observed at the company) must be made and highlighted. In this section the student can add a supported table includes which academic course (s) (course title and code) helped to perform training tasks. For example, two columns; the first one shows the course name and second column shows the tasks performed and related to this course.

Show some work samples that you have encountered/conducted at the company through graphs, pictures, data, drawings, or design calculations and include them in your report.

Lessons learnt (what the overall benefits gained from the training program)

Chapter 3: Recommendations

Advantageous that helped the student in completing the training program.

Disadvantageous and challenges that faced the student and how he/she did overcome them.

Recommendations to improve training program in the college.

Recommendation for the training company. Conclusion Sum up and summary of the training experience. Reference If it is needed Appendix (option) This will help the instructor to have a background about the trainee and his/her previous experiences. Also, it helps the students in writing their CVs for future job application especially for fresh graduates who do not have previous practical experiences.

Basic information (name, city, contact details…etc.).

Job objectives.

Academic qualifications.

Practical experiences.

Skills this will help the instructor to have a background about the trainee and his/her previous experiences[supanova_question]

1) Explore in detail the geographic features of South America and how

1) Explore in detail the geographic features of South America and how both geography and history have influenced their development. Remember each continent is made up of many different countries, and there is a great deal of diversity among them. What are the current issues facing your selected continent? What is the current economic and political situation in your selected continent? Are there wars or conflicts currently being waged there? What goods do they import and export? How does this affect their development and economic status?

2) Population Growth and Climate change are very much linked. We spent considerable time in class discussing both. In this essay, first I want you to introduce each of these issues and summarize the essential background and problem. In other words, what is the concern with population growth and what is the worry about climate change. Next, explain how and why they are linked.  Then I want you to take three of the five methodologies we have studied (i.e. economics, political science, etc.) and devise a set of three to five questions from each methodological approach that students of international studies would ask about the combined effects of climate change and population growth. To the extent you can, formulate an answer. If you don’t know the answer, you can say that as well. For example – if population growth slowed, would this have a positive effect on climate change? Finally, conclude your essay with one or two prescriptive approaches to resolving this combined problem.[supanova_question]

Intro to Earth Sciences Climate Change? The Modern CO2 Record Modern CO2

Intro to Earth Sciences

Climate Change? The Modern CO2 Record

Modern CO2 Record Measurements

In this lab, we will focus on the levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) that scientists have measured at permanent observatories at Mauna Loa (Hawai’i), Barrow (Alaska), and the South Pole. We will use these data to investigate

processes that might control variations in atmospheric CO2 levels during the year, and

(2) processes that might explain the long-term trend in atmospheric CO2 levels.

We will also briefly at another greenhouse gas that may contribute to climate change.

_________________________________________________________________________

In 1958, scientists (notably Professor Charles Keeling) began to use high-precision equipment (e.g., infrared analyzers) to measure the abundance of atmospheric CO2 at selected sites around the globe. Among the initial sites were Mauna Loa, a 13,000-foot mountain on Hawai’i, and a station just a few miles from the South Pole. Measurements were begun at later times at other stations (e.g., 1973 for Barrow).

1. Familiarize yourself with the locations of these three measuring stations:

2. Examine the three graphs below. The curve on each graph connects monthly measurements, though it’s difficult or impossible to see the points for individual months at this scale.

A. What is the variable being measured? Click or tap here to enter text.

B. What units are used to express this variable? Click or tap here to enter text.

C. In your own words, express what this means (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parts-per_notation)

Click or tap here to enter text.

3. Although none of the graphs below showing average monthly CO2 concentration increase from 1958-2004 are a perfectly smooth curve, all of them show the same long-term pattern. Describe this pattern in 1-2 sentences.

Click or tap here to enter text.

4. The numbers below show the monthly (numbered 1 (Jan) through 12 (Dec)) readings for the years 2003 and 2004 at each station. The last column is the annual average. Plot the 2004 results from all three stations on the same graph on the next page. Connect the points for each site with a smooth curve and label each curve with the site name. You can also do this in Microsoft Excel and insert the graph into MS Word.

MLoa

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

Avg

2003

374.7

375.6

376.1

377.6

378.4

378.1

376.6

374.5

373.0

373.0

374.4

375.7

375.6

2004

376.8

377.4

378.4

380.5

380.6

379.6

377.8

375.9

374.1

374.2

375.9

377.5

377.4

Barrow

2003

379.0

382.3

381.4

381.4

382.2

380.8

371.0

364.7

368.3

372.5

378.6

382.5

377.0

2004

382.6

383.2

382.2

383.8

383.5

380.5

371.8

366.5

367.9

373.5

379.2

382.3

378.1

S. Pole

2003

371.9

371.8

371.7

372.0

372.3

372.6

373.0

373.4

373.9

373.8

373.6

373.6

372.8

2004

373.6

373.4

373.8

373.9

374.1

374.5

374.8

375.4

375.5

375.6

375.5

375.2

374.6

Each of the three curves should clearly show a cycle known as a short-period oscillation (movement back and forth in a sequence). You would have received nearly identical curves if you’d graphed the 2003 data instead, because the curves have 12-month periods (i.e., 12 months from peak to peak or from trough to trough).

Our goal is to determine the cause of these short-period oscillations. Let’s analyze some aspects of these three curves.

5. First, in what month are the maximum and minimum values recorded at each station?

Click or tap here to enter text.

6. What is the amplitude of the oscillation? In other words, what is the difference (in ppm CO2) of the maximum and minimum value over the whole year at each station?

Mauna Loa minimum: Click or tap here to enter text.ppm

Mauna Loa maximum: Click or tap here to enter text.ppm

Mauna Loa amplitude: Click or tap here to enter text.ppm

Barrow minimum: Click or tap here to enter text.ppm

Barrow maximum: Click or tap here to enter text.ppm

Barrow amplitude: Click or tap here to enter text.ppm

South Pole minimum: Click or tap here to enter text.ppm

South Pole maximum: Click or tap here to enter text.ppm

South Pole amplitude: Click or tap here to enter text.ppm

7. Interpret your results (in terms of the geographic locations of the three sites) to answer the following questions.

A. Why do the oscillations in atmospheric CO2 occur during the year (Hint: Research the photosynthesis and respiration reactions and their relationship to CO2)?

Click or tap here to enter text.

B. Why do the oscillations peak when they do – how does yearly change in seasonal plant/algae growth relate to the oscillations?

Click or tap here to enter text.

C. Why is the amplitude of the South Pole station so much smaller than that of the other two?

Click or tap here to enter text.

Geologic History of atmospheric CO2 levels

Now let’s look farther back in time at atmospheric CO2 levels. Though precise measurements only began in 1958, scientists have been able to sample “fossil air” from the early 1900s and even the 1800s in tightly sealed bottles of wine of known vintage, and in old brass buttons with sealed air gaps.

They have also been able to sample and date fossil air in ice layers. The Law Dome ice cores in Antarctica sampled ice over a thousand years old (below).

The cores from Law Dome show that the amount of CO2 in the atmosphere was fairly constant from 1000 A.D. until about 1850, when it began to increase rapidly. Most atmospheric scientists attribute the increase to the emissions of CO2 from the burning of fossil fuels, which accelerated dramatically in the Industrial Revolution of the mid-1800s. However, others have suggested that

the increase is a natural phenomenon—one of Earth’s natural cycles that simply coincides with the increased burning of fossil fuels.

In 1998, scientists drilled a 2-mile-deep ice core at Vostok, Antarctica that gives us the CO2 record over the last 400,000 years. [Note: 400 kyr = 400,000 yr; BP = before present.]

The troughs on this graph correspond to Ice Ages, and the peaks correspond to the warmer interglacial periods.

8. What was the highest concentration of atmospheric CO2 during any of these interglacial periods?

Click or tap here to enter text.ppm

9. Using the top diagram on p. 2, estimate the current average concentration of atmospheric CO2 (use the yearly average Mauna Loa data for 2004):

Click or tap here to enter text.ppm

10. Over the last 30 years, the rate of increase of CO2 at Mauna Loa has been ~1.5 ppm/year. If this rate continues, what will the level of CO2 be in 2030 (26 years from 2004) or 2050 (46 years from 2004)?

In 2030 ______________ ppm in 2050 _____________ ppm

Look up the current atmospheric CO2 concentration for the previous month? Has CO2 increase accelerated or decelerated compared to your prediction above?

https://www.co2.earth/

Click or tap here to enter text.

Methane’s Atmospheric Geologic History

Methane (CH4) is another effective greenhouse gas; in fact, it’s about 23 times more effective at trapping heat than CO2 is. Fortunately, it’s much less abundant in the atmosphere (measured in parts per billion instead of parts per million).

Unfortunately, atmospheric CH4 has increased by 250% since the late1700s (results from polar ice cores):

Methane forms when organic matter decays—which has been going on for billions of years. We need to understand why it has increased so much in the last few centuries.

Scientists estimate that 3/4 of all methane currently emitted into the atmosphere comes from human activities. Chief culprits are (1) decomposing landfills, (2) the processing of oil and gas, (3) “enteric fermentation, mainly cattle,” and (4) agricultural activities like growing rice.

11. The CH4 curve shows a dramatic upswing at 1800 A.D. Applying what you know about human history, discuss whether each of the four sources listed above is likely to have increased in the last 200 years. In other words, evaluate the proposal that the increase in CH4 is due to human activities. Identify specific trends, activities, etc. that support your ideas.

Click or tap here to enter text.[supanova_question]

What are the best way for schools to stop bullying? I need

What are the best way for schools to stop bullying?

I need 7-8 slides PowerPoint including title and reference slides.

It has to be informative topic please.

The second PowerPoint

Should welfare recipients be required to pass a drug test?

You can choose any side to discuss the topic

It has to be persuasive topic please.

I need 7 to 8 slides PowerPoint including title and reference slides.[supanova_question]

Pg. 01 Project Instructions College of Computing and Informatics Fundamentals of Databases

Pg. 01

Project Instructions

College of Computing and Informatics

Fundamentals of Databases

IT403

Fundamentals of Databases

IT403

Instructions:

You must submit two separate copies (one Word file and one PDF file). These files must not be in compressed format.

It is your responsibility to check and make sure that you have uploaded both the correct files.

Zero mark will be given if you try to bypass the SafeAssign (e.g., misspell words, remove spaces between words, hide characters, use different character sets, convert text into image or languages other than English or any kind of manipulation).

You are advised to make your work clear and well-presented. This includes filling your information on the cover page.

You must use this template, failing which will result in zero mark.

You MUST show all your work, and text must not be converted into an image, unless specified otherwise by the question.

The work should be your own, copying from students or other resources will result in ZERO mark.

Use Times New Roman font for all your answers.

Instructions:

You must submit two separate copies (one Word file and one PDF file). These files must not be in compressed format.

It is your responsibility to check and make sure that you have uploaded both the correct files.

Zero mark will be given if you try to bypass the SafeAssign (e.g., misspell words, remove spaces between words, hide characters, use different character sets, convert text into image or languages other than English or any kind of manipulation).

You are advised to make your work clear and well-presented. This includes filling your information on the cover page.

You must use this template, failing which will result in zero mark.

You MUST show all your work, and text must not be converted into an image, unless specified otherwise by the question.

The work should be your own, copying from students or other resources will result in ZERO mark.

Use Times New Roman font for all your answers.

Student Details:

Name: ###

CRN: ###

ID: ###

Student Details:

Name: ###

CRN: ###

ID: ###

Project Instructions

In this file, you will find two database project ideas. You must choose one of them to design and implement.

You can work on this project as a group (minimum 3 and maximum 4 students). Each group member must submit the project individually with all group member names mentioned in the cover page.

This project worth 10 marks and will be distributed as in the following:

Design the database, following an ER model. (3 marks)

Tables before Normalization. (1.5 marks)

Tables after Normalization (1.5 marks)

Use MySQL or any other database to create the normalized tables and

populate your tables with at least 5 rows. (2 marks)

Execute the requested sample queries. (2 marks)

Each student must submit one report about his/her chosen Project via the Blackboard (Email submission will not be accepted which will be awarded ZERO marks) containing the following:

ER Diagram.

All schemas before normalization.

All schemas after normalization.

All SQL statements of:

Creating tables.

Inserting data in tables.

All requested queries/results.

Screenshots from MySQL (or any other software you use) of all the tables after population and queries results.

You are advised to make your work clear and well presented; marks may be reduced for poor presentation. This includes filling your information on the cover page.

You MUST show all your work, and text must not be converted into an image, unless specified otherwise by the question.

Late submission will result in ZERO marks being awarded.

The work should be your own, copying from students or other resources will result in ZERO marks.

Use Times New Roman font

Learning Outcome(s):

LO 4

Design a database starting from the conceptual design to the implementation of database schemas.

LO 3

Create Entity-Relationship model, Relational model, and write SQL queries.

Learning Outcome(s):

LO 4

Design a database starting from the conceptual design to the implementation of database schemas.

LO 3

Create Entity-Relationship model, Relational model, and write SQL queries.

Project I

Database System for a cancer registry

Consider a database system for a Cancer Registry. The data requirements are summarized as follows:

1. Patients:

Patients are tracked by a unique patient ID.

Personal information includes first name, last name, phone number, Date of Birth, and sex.

The combination of the Patient’s first and last name must be unique.

Patient’s sex is a mandatory field.

Patient can be registered at any clinic.

2. Cancer:

Type of cancer is tracked by a unique ID.

Cancer is categorized as either Oral, Lung, Breast, Liver, Blood, Bone, Pancreatic, Cervical, or Prostrate.

Stage of cancer can be Stage I, Stage II, or Stage III

Stage of cancer detection.

Treatment given: Chemotherapy only, Surgery with chemotherapy, Surgery only or Radiation therapy.

Patient_id is an FK which references the ID of the Patient.

Clinic_id is an FK which references the ID of the Clinic that patient register.

Patient information must be stored at one clinic.

Patient Date of detection of Cancer.

3. Clinic:

Clinics are tracked by unique clinic ID.

Each clinic has a name and location.

The combination of the clinic’s name and location must be unique.

4. Employees:

Employees are tracked by unique Employee ID.

Clinic_id is a FK which references the Clinic ID which they work at.

Employees must work at a single Clinic.

Personal information includes Fname, Lname and sex.

The combination of an employee’s first and last name must be unique.

Queries:

List the first and last name of all patients who had blood cancer.

List names and location of clinics reported cases of lung cancer.

Find the names of patients whose age is above 50 years and had oral cancer since 10/10/2010.

List the names of employees who are working in clinics, which do not have breast cancer case.

Learning Outcome(s):

LO 4

Design a database starting from the conceptual design to the implementation of database schemas.

LO 3

Create Entity-Relationship model, Relational model, and write SQL queries.

Learning Outcome(s):

LO 4

Design a database starting from the conceptual design to the implementation of database schemas.

LO 3

Create Entity-Relationship model, Relational model, and write SQL queries.

Project II

Database system for a Wholesale Management System

Consider a database system for a Wholesale Management System. The data requirements are summarized as follows:

Maintain the details of stock like their id, name, quantity.

Maintain the details of buyers from which manager must buy the stock like buyer id, name, address, stock id to be bought.

Details of customers i.e. name, address, id.

Defaulters list of customers who have not paid their pending amount after the due date So List of payment paid or pending.

The stock that is to buy if quantity goes less than a particular amount.

Profit calculation for a month.

Quantity cannot be sold to a customer if the required amount is not present in stock and date of delivery should be maintained up to which stock can be provided.

SQL Queries:

List of payment paid or pending customers.

Find the Defaulters list of customers who have not paid their pending amount.

Find the details of customers name, address, id.

Find Query to get information of employee where employee is not assigned to the department.

List the stock that is to buy if quantity goes less than a particular amount.

10 Marks

10 Marks

Your Project

Title of Your Project

3 Marks

3 Marks

ER Diagram

1.5 Marks

1.5 Marks Tables before the Normalization

1.5 Marks

1.5 Marks Tables after the normalization (At least in 3NF)

2 Marks

2 Marks Create the Normalized Tables and Populate them with at least 5 Rows

2 Marks

2 Marks Write the sample requested Queries & Execute them.[supanova_question]

Module 4: Lecture Materials

https://brytewave.redshelf.com this is where you find the books, login attached Read Rausch, T. P. (2003). Chapter 6 “The Death of Jesus” pg. 95-109 Chapter 7 “God Raised Him from the Dead” pg. 111-116 Stop at “The Easter Stories” then continue at the section “Reflections on Easter Faith: Historical Event of the Product of Faith” pg. 118-123 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G_OlRWGLdnw https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_unHmAf7INk https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5CLBy2r72Cg https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2-SDIA2OH4U https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rH2wn47WByQ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2qIgF9NGgVo https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CZSlHdEoz40 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GDGcWjg5sbs https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WWbQKULrXos https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G9iA0UK1Nvo please sum all the videos as well, really short though because there are lot of them[supanova_question]

2 Effects of population growth on urban environments in India, a case

2

Effects of population growth on urban environments in India, a case of Mumbai

Economically and socially, the population above the optimum size in a country is important because it would maximize its resources. Such a population is also imperative in expanding the size of the local market, enabling local entrepreneurs to take advantage of the economies of scale. A high population creates a high demand for products as well as offers a sufficient labor force. However, environmentally, population growth has numerous and hazardous impacts on both the environment and people’s well-being. Several studies have been conducted on climate change and environmental degradation. However, no detailed, empirical, and comprehensive study has been carried out to study the effects of population growth on the urban environment. This study intends to fill this gap while taking Mumbai as a case study. Mumbai was selected because it is one of the most populated cities in India. With substantial peer-reviewed articles and internet sources, this study aims at establishing how population growth has been a significant problem in various cities.

This topic is important because it involves the study of the environment. The environment is one of the risk factors of various diseases, ranging from airborne to water-borne ailments. This means that if the environment, as beautiful as it may appear, is mismanaged, it may turn out to be dangerous. The topic is also important because its findings will teach the people, especially the Mumbai residents, that although population growth is important in economic and business development, it is one of the deadliest factors affecting the urban environment. Third, this topic is important because it will reveal how population growth adversely affects the environment, ranging from pollution or climate change to environmental degradation. Lastly, this topic is vital because the finding will be used to suggest how population growth could be controlled to conserve the urban environments.

Keywords: Pollution, Environmental degradation, population growth, climate change.

Annotated bibliography

Singh, E., Kumar, A., Mishra, R., & Kumar, S. (2021). Eco-efficiency Tool for Urban Solid Waste Management System: A Case Study of Mumbai, India. In Sustainability in Environmental Engineering and Science (pp. 263-270). Springer, Singapore.

According to Singh, Kumar, Mishra, & Kumar, (2021), a population above the optimum size is of great importance both economically and socially. Such a population is also imperative in expanding the size of the local market, enabling local entrepreneurs to take advantage of the economies of scale.

Li, W., & Yi, P. (2020). Assessment of city sustainability—Coupling coordinated development among economy, society, and environment. Journal of Cleaner Production, 256, 120453.

(Li, & Yi, 2020) argues that a high population creates a high demand for products as well as offers a sufficient labor force.

Vittal, H., Karmakar, S., Ghosh, S., & Murtugudde, R. (2020). A comprehensive India-wide social vulnerability analysis: highlighting its influence on hydro-climatic risk. Environmental Research Letters, 15(1), 014005.

However, Vittal, Karmakar, Ghosh, & Murtugudde, (2020), outlines the numerous and hazardous impacts effects of population growth have on both the environment and people’s well-being. Several studies have been conducted on climate change and environmental degradation.

Bardhan, R., Sarkar, S., Jana, A., & Velaga, N. R. (2015). Mumbai slums since independence: Evaluating the policy outcomes. Habitat International, 50, 1-11.

There has not been any detailed, empirical, and comprehensive study that has been carried out to study the effects of population growth on the urban environment (Bardhan, Sarkar, Jana & Velaga, (2015). This study intends to fill this gap while taking Mumbai as a case study.

Li, L., Jiang, C., Murtugudde, R., Liang, X. Z., & Sapkota, A. (2021). Global population exposed to extreme events in the 150 most populated cities of the world: implications for public health. International journal of environmental research and public health, 18(3), 1293.

Mumbai was selected because it is one of the most populated cities in India (Li, Jiang, Murtugudde, Liang, & Sapkota, (2021). With substantial peer-reviewed articles and internet sources, this study aims at establishing how population growth has been a significant problem in various cities. 

Manojkumar, N., & Srimuruganandam, B. (2021). Health effects of particulate matter in major Indian cities. International journal of environmental health research, 31(3), 258-270.

This topic is important because it involves the study of the environment. According to (Manojkumar, & Srimuruganandam (2021), the environment is one of the risk factors of various diseases, ranging from airborne to water-borne ailments.

Triassi, M., Alfano, R., Illario, M., Nardone, A., Caporale, O., & Montuori, P. (2015). Environmental pollution from illegal waste disposal and health effects: A review on the “Triangle of Death”. International journal of environmental research and public health, 12(2), 1216-1236

(Triassi, Alfano, Illario, Nardone, Caporale, & Montuori, 2015) warns if the environment, as beautiful as it may appear, is mismanaged, it may turn out to be dangerous. Mismanaged cities are leaving people living in the cities vulnerable to natural and technological disasters.

Balland, P. A., Jara-Figueroa, C., Petralia, S. G., Steijn, M. P., Rigby, D. L., & Hidalgo, C. A. (2020). Complex economic activities concentrate in large cities. Nature Human Behaviour, 4(3), 248-254.

The other importance of carrying out search a study according to (Balland, Jara-Figueroa, Petralia, Steijn, Rigby, & Hidalgo, 2020) is its findings will teach the people, especially the Mumbai residents, that although population growth is important in economic and business development, it is one of the deadliest factors affecting the urban environment.

Khalid, K., Usman, M., & Mehdi, M. A. (2021). The determinants of environmental quality in the SAARC region: a spatial heterogeneous panel data approach. Environmental Science and Pollution Research, 28(6), 6422-6436.

Khalid, Usman & Mehdi (2021) argue that this topic is essential because it reveals how population growth adversely affects the environment, ranging from pollution or climate change to environmental degradation.

Anser, M. K., Alharthi, M., Aziz, B., & Wasim, S. (2020). Impact of urbanization, economic growth, and population size on residential carbon emissions in the SAARC countries. Clean Technologies & Environmental Policy, 22(4).

As (Anser, Alharthi, Aziz, & Wasim, 2020) put it, this topic is vital because the findings will suggest how population growth could be controlled to conserve the urban environments.

References

Anser, M. K., Alharthi, M., Aziz, B., & Wasim, S. (2020). Impact of urbanization, economic
growth, and population size on residential carbon emissions in the SAARC countries.
Clean Technologies & Environmental Policy, 22(4).

Balland, P. A., Jara-Figueroa, C., Petralia, S. G., Steijn, M. P., Rigby, D. L., & Hidalgo, C. A.
(2020). Complex economic activities concentrate in large cities. Nature Human
Behaviour, 4(3), 248-254.

Bardhan, R., Sarkar, S., Jana, A., & Velaga, N. R. (2015). Mumbai slums since independence:

Evaluating the policy outcomes. Habitat International, 50, 1-11.

Li, L., Jiang, C., Murtugudde, R., Liang, X. Z., & Sapkota, A. (2021). Global population exposed
to extreme vents in the 150 most populated cities of the world: implications for public
health. International journal of environmental research and public health, 18(3), 1293.

Li, W., & Yi, P. (2020). Assessment of city sustainability—Coupling coordinated development

among economy, society and environment. Journal of Cleaner Production, 256, 120453.

Khalid, K., Usman, M., & Mehdi, M. A. (2021). The determinants of environmental quality in

the SAARC region: a spatial heterogeneous panel data approach. Environmental Science

and Pollution Research, 28(6), 6422-6436.

Manojkumar, N., & Srimuruganandam, B. (2021). Health effects of particulate matter in major

Indian cities. International journal of environmental health research, 31(3), 258-270.

Singh, E., Kumar, A., Mishra, R., & Kumar, S. (2021). Eco-efficiency Tool for Urban Solid

Waste Management System: A Case Study of Mumbai, India. In Sustainability in

Environmental Engineering and Science (pp. 263-270). Springer, Singapore.

Triassi, M., Alfano, R., Illario, M., Nardone, A., Caporale, O., & Montuori, P. (2015).
Environmental pollution from illegal waste disposal and health effects: A review on the
“Triangle of Death”. International journal of environmental research and public health,
12(2), 1216-1236.

Vittal, H., Karmakar, S., Ghosh, S., & Murtugudde, R. (2020). A comprehensive India-wide

Social vulnerability analysis: highlighting its influence on hydro-climatic risk.

Environmental Research Letters, 15(1), 014005.[supanova_question]

Rankine cycle Most steam power plants operate according to a Rankine cycle

Rankine cycle

Most steam power plants operate according to a Rankine cycle with overheating. This means that the steam heated above its saturation temperature at the pressure in the boiler. A simple Rankine bike with overheating and a turbine stage are illustrated in the figure below, and a Rankine cycle with two turbine stages and intermediate overheating is illustrated in the figure at the bottom of the page.

The pressure in the steam boiler is 80 bar and the pressure in the condenser is 0.1 bar. Write a Matlab program and:

For a Rankine cycle without intermediate overheating, as shown in the figure above, vary the T3 within reasonable limits and calculate the efficiency of the cycle for each temperature. Plot the results and justify the boundaries you chose.

A long-pressure turbine is added to the steam power plant so that it now operates according to a Rankine cycle with intermediate overheating (see figure below). The Matlab program should ask the user for one value of T3 between selected limits. The steam is overheated to the same temperature before both the high-pressure and low-pressure turbine (T3 = T5). Vary P4 within reasonable limits and create one graph for how the efficiency depends on the ratio P4 / P3. Justify the boundaries you chose for P4.

Use your Matlab program to find the P4 for which efficiency is maximized, if T3 = T5 = 450 ° C.

How is the value of P4 affected where the efficiency is maximized if the user chooses a higher one or lower value of T3 than 450 ° C?[supanova_question]

Answer will be over 150 words or a minimum of 12 sentences for each discussion question. There will be

Answer will be over 150 words or a minimum of 12 sentences for each discussion question. There will be

Instructions You’ll complete this assignment in several steps: 1. First, open the files you submitted in Units 7, 8, Essay

Instructions You’ll complete this assignment in several steps: 1. First, open the files you submitted in Units 7, 8, Essay. Instructions You’ll complete this assignment in several steps: 1. First, open the files you submitted in Units 7, 8, Essay.

Instructions

You’ll complete this assignment in several steps:

1. First, open the files you submitted in Units 7, 8, and 9 and use the ‘Save As’ command in each of these programs to rename your file using the following standard: YourLastName_YourFirstName_revised. For example, Street_Rhonda_revised.docx for the Word file. The computer adds the file extension for you automatically.

2. Second, carefully consider the feedback your instructor gave you for these assignments in the previous units and incorporate the suggested changes into the newly-renamed files. Save all changes.

3. Third, review the instructions for these exercises again, making sure you’ve completed all of the steps. While feedback from an instructor or peers in an academic setting is essential for success, ultimately, it’s up to you, the creator, to make sure the work meets standards. If you make changes during this step, be sure to save your work.

4. Fourth, create a new Word document named YourLastName_YourFirstName_summary.docx. In 250 -300 words, address one of the two following prompts:

If you made changes to your files for this assignment, detail what changes you made. Discuss the importance of the revision process in academic work. Also, identify two tools from this unit (e.g., Grammarly, Track Changes, Spell Check) that could help you with revising your academic work. How could each of these tools assist you in refining your work?
If you didn’t need to make changes to your files for this assignment because you scored perfectly on each assignment in the initial units, explain to your reader the importance of revision in the academic setting and what steps you undertook in the initial units to make sure your project received high marks. Also, identify two tools from this unit (e.g., Grammarly, Track Changes, Spell Check) that could help you with revising your academic work. How could each of these tools assist you in refining your work?
This part of the comprehensive project should be written in paragraph form, with proper grammar, spelling, and mechanics.

Feedbacks
week 7 doc too much space better title of paper and my name wrong apa format needed to be apa format 7 no title heading on page 1

week 8
1) On the data sheet, you are missing the extra row within the middle of your sheet.
2) You did not name the workbook/assignment correctly.
week 9 presentation
no feedback from instructor[supanova_question]

Clinical Assessment sheet Clients name: Age, gender, race: Chief Complaint: History of

Clinical Assessment sheet

Clients name: Age, gender, race:

Chief Complaint:

History of Present Illness:

Psychiatric symptoms

Substance use

Suicidal thoughts

Current services

Psychotherapy

Medications

Other (e.g. hospital, outpatient, case management)

Past Mental Illness History:

Past psychotherapy, type, duration, and effectiveness

Past psychiatric medications, dose, duration, and effectiveness

Hospitalizations, outpatient, other services

Medical History:

Any medical or surgical history, present and past

Medications

Current medications and other treatments

Social History:

Relationships

Living arrangement

Family of origin/upbringing

Friends

Military

Employment

School

Family Genetic History:

Anyone in biological family with mental illnesses, suicide attempts, hospitalizations, medication trials that did or did not work

Mental Status Exam:

Appearance:

Attitude:

Behavior:

Speech:

Mood:

Affect:

Thought process: (e.g. rapid, slow)

Thought content: (hallucinations, delusions, suicidal thoughts, cognitive distortions, etc.)

Insight and judgment:

Formal mental status exam (if necessary):

Lab/radiology exams:

If any have been done

Assessment:

General discussion and summary

Diagnoses:

Plan:

Biological intervention(s): Medications, TMS, deep brain stimulation, etc.

Psychological intervention(s): Cognitive behavioral, Dialectical behavioral therapy, specific therapies listed in chapters and Power Points, etc.

Social/cultural intervention(s): Group therapy, housing, laws, systems, education, school interventions, etc.

Further work-up (if necessary):

Etiology discussion (the biological, psychological, and social etiologies will vary in degree depending on the disorder)

Biological aspects of the disorder

Psychological aspects of the disorder

Social aspects of the disorder[supanova_question]

Lecture notes provided by professor. Class 6 The last quarter of the

Instructions You’ll complete this assignment in several steps: 1. First, open the files you submitted in Units 7, 8, Essay Lecture notes provided by professor.

Class 6

The last quarter of the 18th century and the first three or decades of the 19th century are sometimes referred to as the age of revolutions. The American Revolution of 1776 inaugurated an extended period of rebellion and regime change. Before that revolution had culminated in the ratification of the Bill of Rights, two other interrelated revolutions were under way. One in France and one in Haiti. Both occurred within the French Empire. One transformed that global power. The other culminated in independence from it.

Together, the American, French, and Haitian revolutions transformed Atlantic understandings of empire, rights, governance, and constitutionalism. The American Revolution showed that colonists of European descent could found and maintain a republic more democratic than the empire from which they split. It transformed notions of the sovereignty of the people from theory to what is now the longest-running experiment in popular governance in the world. The French Revolution went further in some ways. Unfolding in the heart of Europe, it eventually overthrew a monarchy, moved to upend society, placed ambitious declarations of universal rights at the forefront of its movement, and aimed to spread its innovations. The Haitian Revolution was more dramatic still. The largest and only successful slave revolt that the Atlantic World has ever known, it involved men and women uprooted from diverse parts of Africa and condemned to bondage rising up across divisions of ethnicity, language, and culture to overthrow what had once appeared to be an almost invincible regime of oppression. In its place, they would found the black nation of Haiti, which remains the second-oldest independent nation in the Americas to this day. Slavery would never seem inevitable again.

[Slide: Map of French Empire circa 1754]

In tracing these events, we will mostly move back and forth between France, especially Paris, and Haiti. To provide some background, here is a map of the French empire from just before the French and Haitian revolutions began and just before the American Revolution culminated in ratification of a new Constitution. The key thing to notice is that France controls this portion of this island here, known at the time as Saint-Domingue. That portion of the island is today called Haiti. The remainder of the island is today the Dominican Republic. Saint Domingue was sometimes referred to as the Pearl the Antilles because of the enormous wealth produced there through the cultivation of sugar. Recall that slavery was central to the profitability to southern portions of the new United States. It was also producing profits for England on the island of Jamaica, right there. But the model for wringing profits from slave-based agriculture was Saint-Domingue.

[Slide: Drawing of a sugar plantation from DuBois’ book, Avengers of the New World]

Slavery in Saint Domingue was as brutal as it was profitable. During the 18th century, nearly 800,000 slaves were placed onto ships headed for the island. Perhaps 100,000 of them died en route during the brutal middle passage. By 1790, nearly 50,000 slaves were arriving each year. In total, Saint Domingue accounted for about 10% of the total trans-Atlantic slave trade. Yet despite nearly 1MM slaves in total reaching Saint Domingue by the end of the 18th century, only half that number resided on the island as slavery gave way to uprising. The problem, one woman remarked, was that “They are always dying.’ In fact, half of new arrivals died within a few years. On some plantations, half of newborn slave children died before reaching adulthood. Death rates among slaves were nearly twice as high as birth rates. Planters calculated that it was more profitable to work slaves to death and buy new ones than to invest in adequate food, clothing, medical care, and working conditions.

The society that formed around slavery was far from monolithic. The most powerful members were the landowners, for land meant agriculture, which meant profit. Slaves, and eventually everyone on the island, called these men the blanc blancs, or the white whites. Other white residents were known as the petit whites. Such men might act as overseers of slaves. Finally, there were free people of color, including some who had served in the American Revolution.

By necessity of occupying an astoundingly vulnerable position, slaves became expert at finding ways to negotiate their situation. They developed and defended customary rights, most importantly that to a small garden plot of land. They gained permission to go to town occasionally, socialize, worship, keep profits from their garden plots, and buy and retain occasional possessions. Smaller numbers of slaves simply ran away, joining bands in the mountains who raided plantations. Owners and their agents understood the danger of slave autonomy and were careful to take steps to counteract it. Public whippings, at times supplemented with tortures like burning and rubbing salt into wounds were calculated to cow observers as much as offenders.

FRENCH REVOLUTION

[Slide: Book cover of Peter McPhee’s The French Revolution, 1789-1799]

As slaves in Saint Domingue suffered and maneuvered, a revolution began in France. The underlying causes of the revolution were complex and remain subjects of intense debate among historians. But the basic events can be briefly summarized. In April 1789, an Estates General that King Louis XVI had called began meeting in Versailles. Estates General were rare events where the three non-royal estates in France – the clergy, the nobles, and the Third Estate of the people – met at the same time. Property restrictions on the franchise and indirect voting by which the people chose delegates who then chose the deputies to the Estate resulted in relatively elite non-nobles filling the Third Estate. Members of the Third Estate soon discovered that they were largely united in opposition to absolutism and privilege, both of which were strong currents in monarchical and quasi-feudal France. As liberal members of the other estates began to join the meetings of the Third Estate, Louis ordered the deputies from all the estates to gather together in the assembly of the Third Estate. But this apparent victory masked a likelihood that Louis would simply dismiss the Assembly. That result was avoided by an uprising in Paris among the working people, most of whom had not been permitted to participate in choosing deputies to the Third Estate. This uprising included the storming and taking of the Bastille, the prison in Paris where political prisoners were held. As news of this unprecedented challenge to royal and noble authority spread, village militias throughout France turned on local nobles and sought to dismantle the feudal system. The revolt came to be known as the Great Fear.

[Slide: Historical Image of French Assembly circa 1789]

This popular uprising reinvigorated the Assembly, which abolished serfdom, feudalism, and unpaid labor, and planned to render taxation more equitable. Then, on August 27, 1889, the Assembly enacted the Declaration of the Rights of Man and Citizen. Its language suggested that all human beings possessed a broad set of inalienable rights. You’ll recall that the Declaration of Independence, Constitution, and Bill of Rights in the United States also employed soaring, universal declarations of the self-evident rights of man. There, those claims had coexisted with slavery. Although all recognized the contradiction, the U.S. Constitution permitted and even strengthened the institution of slavery. In the early days of the French Revolution, it remained highly uncertain what policy France would take toward slavery in its imperial possessions. More broadly, it was unclear whether the universal rights and civic equality that the Declaration promised in universal terms would extend to women or the property-less.

Yet the Declaration promised to reshape French society, and it was to that the Assembly turned. By mid-1791, Louis had become disgusted with the resolution, which had altered church structure and limited his own power. On June 21, he repudiated the direction that the Revolution had taken and fled Paris. Six days later, he was captured and returned to Paris, a humiliating reversal. With little alternative, on September 14 Louis promulgated a new Constitution. France was a constitutional monarchy in which the king shared power with a legislature elected via a restrictive property franchise.

By 1791, Le Cap was the largest port in Saint-Domingue. Slavery had made Saint Domingue a place worth docking. Le Cap’s population rivaled Boston. The ships who passed through its harbor brought goods and news.

[Slide: Map of the Town of Le Cap, 1789]

As France turned toward revolution, planters became fearful of the impact on their society. They sought to control the flow of information into the colony, clearly aware of how easily information could travel among plantations and slaves once unleashed. They also maneuvered in Paris to defeat attempts by representatives of free people of color in Saint-Domingue to gain equal rights. After gaining control of a key committee, they won passage of a March 1790 decree reaffirming the status quo. Far from a step toward emancipation, the early French Revolution had refused even to abolish racial distinctions among the free. To those who might have their eyes set on ending slavery, the decree declared that “all those who worked to incite uprisings against the planter will be declared guilty of crimes against the nation.” In response, a key political leader among Saint Domingue’s free people of color raised an armed force and demanded equal rights. He self-consciously compared himself to those of the Third Estate in France and the planters to the nobles and clergy whose views had been all but ignored during the revolution. The powers that be put down the revolt and tortured and executed its leader, heightening tensions between free whites and free people of color in Saint Domingue. Back in Paris, the brutal treatment alienated some from the planters’ cause but fell far short of ending support for slavery in Paris.

[Slide: Bay of Le Cap]

Although it is hard to reconstruct the origins of the Haitian Revolution, it appears that nighttime meetings among slaves were underway by August 1791. At the final meeting, it seems that one slave repeated a rumor that the king had guaranteed slaves three free days each week, but that the planters had denied it to the slaves. If so, it would not be the first time that the king had decreed better treatment for slaves that the planters failed to implement. The rumor was not true, but the slaves were not wrong that they might be able to conjure up an alliance between the metropole and royalty with which to contest the power of the planters in Saint Domingue. It is worth noting that embrace of the king was not a rejection of the French Revolution. At this stage, France was a constitutional monarchy. Some sense that the insurgents attempted to reconcile these two authorities could be seen in one insurgent leader’s flag that decorated the tricolor flag of the revolution with the fleur-de-lis of the crown. Royal symbols also had two additional advantages. For many slaves, the most immediate resonance of kings were not European monarchies, but the religious and political leaders they had known in Africa and the slave leaders who had arisen in Saint Domingue and taken on the moniker of king. Also, the other half of the island, Santo Domingo, was under the control of the Spanish crown, so positioning themselves as defenders of royalism gave them space to ally with Spanish forces in future conflicts, which they eventually did. But for now, the revolution had yet to begin. On August 23, nearly 2,000 slaves rose up. As they moved between plantations killing whites, other slaves rose up. Soon, flames engulfed much of the northern plain.

[Slide: 1791 Uprising in St. Domingue]

As the years progressed, well over 100,000 former slaves took up arms. Here was a uniquely transcultural movement. Most were from Africa, and from many different regions. They arrived in Saint Domingue with diverse political, social, and religious experiences. Others had been born into slavery. All had interacted with whites, who were themselves a mix of Saint Domingue-born creoles, more recent arrivals from France, and immigrants from other parts of Europe. As this society overwhelmingly formed of relative newcomers came to take shape, it underwent what Sydney Mintz has called a process of creolization. Individuals grabbed onto, reshaped, and recombined the many cultural and social elements around them into something new – a Caribbean society that neither mirrored the cultures from which its population hailed nor simply represented some sort of a middle ground between them. Creolization was a creative and generative process that bestowed a new and unique society and culture on the world. The process operated differently and with different outcomes among differing sub-communities. And as if not dynamic enough already, it was repeatedly reinvigorated and unsettled by the wars, political upheavals, and new ideas constantly buffeting the island.

[Slide: Drawing of Burning of the Northern Plain]

It’s worth pausing a moment here to note how difficult the task of recovering the how of the Haitian revolution has been for historians. The slaves left few written records. Most of what we know about them comes from the observations and arguments of their enemies. Thus, historians have had to read documents “against the grain” to try and gain glimpses of the dynamics of the revolution. It is that hard work that makes this telling possible today. Many historians have contributed. We rely on Dubois, whose synthesis of prior work remains the definitive account.

[Slide: Front cover of Laurent Dubois’s Avengers of the New World]

As we return to France, we leave behind a slavocracy in crisis. Despite the common threat of the insurgency, the free population of Saint Domingue had not been able to unite. Free people of color continued to demand rights. As they pressed harder, whites reacted violently. One conflagration ended with whites indiscriminately slaughtering a town’s residents of colors. A fire then broke out and burned the entire town to ashes.

FRANCE

Back in France, new elections had brought new legislators to the assembly in late 1791. They soon ended the monarchy, eliminated the remaining vestiges of feudalism, and declared France a Republic. The convention understood their struggle to be one with significance for other countries too. The U.S. revolutionary Tom Paine, for instance, had been elected to a seat in the Assembly. The convention also deemed James Madison, Alexander Hamilton, and George Washington to be honorary French citizens for having “brought reason to its present maturity.”

The National Assembly in France realized that a divided free society could not survive in Saint Domingue. It now moved in mid-1792 somewhat closer to fidelity to its revolutionary ideals by granting men of color in the colony “equality of political rights.” If the goal was to preserve slavery, this was a sensible move as most free people of color in Saint-Domingue favored the continuation of slavery. Hence, the color line was abolished among the free. The line between freedom and slavery sharpened. Those in Saint Domingue of African descent subsequently held real political power. Planters came under attack in Paris as reactionaries. Ironically, the price of slavery had become racial equality.

[Slide: Historical image of the execution of King Louis XVI]

On January 23, 1793, the Assembly further eliminated the king from France, this time by executing Louis XVI.

Back in Haiti, two commissioners from the National Assembly in Paris arrived in le Cap in September 1792. Both were proponents of radical republicanism and opponents of slavery. They encountered a slave revolt that had discovered the language of the French Revolution, especially the Declaration of Rights of Man and Citizen. Insurgent leaders articulately pointed out the hypocrisy of French revolutionaries who pronounced that “men are born free and equal in rights” and held “natural rights” to “liberty, property, security, and resistance to repression” yet sought to prop up slavery. They deemed themselves the true representatives of revolutionary ideals and offered to lay down arms following emancipation and a general amnesty.

Once on the ground, the commissioners quickly consolidated power. They dissolved the colonial assembly in Saint Domingue, which had not yet held an election in which free residents of color participated. In its place, they created a governing commission staffed in equal numbers by white residents and those of color over which they retained great power.

The execution of King Louis XVI sparked an inter-imperial war as Spain and Britain joined Austria in opposition to France. Suddenly, the numerous, experienced, and armed insurgents became crucial potential allies for all sides. Taking advantage of France’s unwillingness in previous years to end slavery, Spain recruited some insurgents to fight against the French. As white Saint-Domingue planters looked to a British takeover as a way to restore the society and privilege that was fast slipping away, the French commissioners from the National Assembly offered slaves in arms freedom to fight for the French empire. The immediate results were promising, but soon it became clear that a more dramatic offer was needed. With imperial power fractured and in conflict and insurgent slaves showing no sign of defeat, the commissioners became convinced that emancipation was inevitable. Hoping to channel and contain this torrent, they made a series of declarations that together abolished slavery throughout Saint Domingue on the ground that “the slavery of a single individual is incompatible with the principles of the Republic.”

[Slide: Painting of Haitian emancipation]

This emancipation was unprecedented. Modest groundwork had been laid in the northern United States where individual states had implemented gradual emancipations of their modest slave populations. But in Saint Domingue, hundreds of thousands slaves became citizens. And unlike in the United States, they were to be equal citizens regardless of race. This left the longer-free people of color who supported slavery little room to maneuver. The British had become the army of the planters, but they were unwilling to preserve the racial equality that the national Assembly had declared a couple years before. The commissioners’ plan worked. Insurgents began rallying behind the French Republic and the ideals to which it now more closely adhered and against the armies of Spain and Great Britain.

Back in Paris, the National Assembly was soon confronted with the commissioners’ decision to unilaterally end slavery in what had recently been its most profitable colony. After years of maneuvering to preserve slavery, the National Assembly now embraced the change that had been thrust upon it. It declared an end to the “aristocracy of the skin.” Without opposition, the Convention decreed slavery abolished throughout the republic. The insurgents had forced the commissioners to declare emancipation, which had brought the National Assembly to the same conclusion. The radicalism of the French Revolution had been realized.

Following emancipation, the insurgents generally aligned with the French republic. They successfully drove the Spanish and then the British from Saint Domingue. The slave revolt had succeeded.

Of course, the story did not end there. France was soon consumed by a counter-revolution, as Napoleon Bonaparte rose to power and declared himself emperor. In the early 19th century, he moved forcefully to reinstate slavery in the French colonies. Outside of Saint Domingue, the effort was a success. In nearby Guadalupe, for instance, slavery returned in 1802. It would not be again – and permanently – abolished throughout the French Empire until 1848. As Napoleon’s intentions became clear, the one-time insurgents again took up arms. Now they were joined by former slaves throughout the island, including many who had not fought before. As French troops arrived in droves, former slaves and disease struck them down in shocking numbers. Another wave of brutal warfare left the slave revolution safe, but the connection between Saint Domingue and France severed.

Haiti now stepped forward as an independent nation. Its new constitution eliminated the color line. All Haitians would be identified as black. Those willing to reject France and slavery could join it and its black race.

[Slide: Book cover for Ada Ferrer’s Freedom’s Mirror]

In an Atlantic world in which slavery was the norm, Haiti was more free even than those northern U.S. states that finally emancipated their relatively few slaves. When slaves escaped the U.S. South for northern U.S. climes, they were subject to return to their masters under the Fugitive Slave Clause to the U.S. Constitution. Haiti, by contrast, was free soil. Slaves who arrived there were automatically declared free by Haiti.

The collapse of Saint Domingue as a slave-based plantation system created opportunities for slave-based sugar production elsewhere. Cuba soon stepped into the breach. It was part of what is known as the second slavery, a nineteenth-century wave of regions that introduced or reinvigorated slavery as they stepped from the margins of the global economy to its center. The lower U.S. South was another such area.

In future years, Haiti loomed large in the Atlantic imagination, especially in the areas of second slavery. Slave masters and imperial agents envisioned the slaves they dominated through constant coercion as a tinderbox, always on the verge of a murderous uprising. As one Puerto Rican writer put it, perhaps their slaves would “come to form a multitude” that would strike as an “exterminating thunderbolt.” Slaves and their allies, by contrast, took inspiration rather than dread from the Haitian example. A different world was possible. Slavery was not impregnable. A black republic could and did exist. For generations to come, lessons of Haiti would circulate throughout the Atlantic World alongside the partially realized ideals of the French and American revolutions. They would provide a stable of constitutional ideas upon which activists in disparate corners would draw in seeking to alter constitutional meaning.[supanova_question]

2 2 Root-Cause Analysis and Safety Improvement Plan Your Name Your University

2

2

Root-Cause Analysis and Safety Improvement Plan

Your Name

Your University

Your Class

Instructor Name

Month, Year

Root-Cause Analysis and Safety Improvement Plan

Introduce a general summary of the issue or sentinel event that the root-cause analysis (RCA) will be exploring. Provide a brief context for the setting in which the event took place. Keep this short and general. Explain to the reader what will be discussed in the paper and this should mimic the scoring guide/the headings.

Analysis of the Root Cause

Describe the issue or sentinel event for which the RCA is being conducted. Provide a clear and concise description of the problem that instigated the RCA. Your description should include information such as:

What happened?

Who detected the problem/event?

Who did the problem/event affect?

How did it affect them?

Provide an analysis of the event and relevant findings. Look to the media simulation, case study, professional experience, or another source of context that you used for the event you described. As you are conducting your analysis and focusing on one or more root causes for your issue or sentinel event, it may be useful to ask questions such as:

What was supposed to occur?

Were there any steps that were not taken or did not happen as intended?

What environmental factors (controllable and uncontrollable) had an influence?

What equipment or resource factors had an influence?

What human errors or factors may have contributed?

Which communication factors may have contributed?

These questions are just intended as a starting point. After analyzing the event, make sure you explicitly state one or more root causes that led to the issue or sentinel event.

Application of Evidence-Based Strategies

Identity best practices strategies to address the safety issue or sentinel event.

Describe what the literature states about the factors that lead to the safety issue.

For example, interruptions during medication administration increase the risk of medication errors by specifically stated data.

Explain how the strategies could be addressed in safety issues or sentinel events.

Improvement Plan with Evidence-Based and Best-Practice Strategies

Provide a description of a safety improvement plan that could realistically be implemented within the health care setting in which your chosen issue or sentinel event took place. This plan should contain:

Actions, new processes or policies, and/or professional development that will be undertaken to address one or more of the root causes.

Support these recommendations with references from the literature or professional best practices.

A description of the goals or desired outcomes of these actions.

A rough timeline of development and implementation for the plan.

Existing Organizational Resources

Identify existing organizational personnel and/or resources that would help improve the implementation or outcomes of the plan.

A brief note on resources that may need to be obtained for the success of the plan.

Consider what existing resources may be leveraged to enhance the improvement plan?

Conclusion

References

Reference page should be double spaced throughout without extra spaces between entries.

Each reference page entry should be formatted according to APA 7 guidelines with a hanging indent as is seen here.[supanova_question]

1 Interdisciplinary Plan Proposal Write a brief introduction (2 to 3 sentences)

1

Interdisciplinary Plan Proposal

Write a brief introduction (2 to 3 sentences) to your proposal that outlines the issue you are attempting to solve, the part of the organization in which the plan would be carried out, and the desired outcome. This will set the stage for the sections below.

Objective

Describe what your plan will do and what you hope it will accomplish in one or two succinct sentences. Also, comment on how the objective, if achieved, will improve organizational or patient outcomes. For example:

Test a double-loop feedback model for evaluating new product risk with a small group of project managers with the goal of reducing the number of new products that fail to launch. This objective is aligned to the broader organizational goal of becoming more efficient taking products to market and, if successful, should improve outcomes by reducing waste.

Questions and Predictions

For this section ask yourself 3 to 5 questions about your objective and your overall plan. Make a prediction for each question by answering the question you posed. This helps you to define the important aspects of your plan as well as limit the scope and check its ability to be implemented.

For example:

How much time will using a double-loop feedback model add to a project manager’s workload?

At first, it will likely increase their workloads by 5 to 10 percent. However, as the process is refined and project managers become more familiar and efficient, that percentage will decrease.

Change Theories and Leadership Strategies

For this section, you may wish to draw upon the research you did regarding change theories and leadership for the Interview and Interdisciplinary Issue Identification assessment. The focus of this section is how those best practices will create buy-in for the project from an interdisciplinary team, improve their collaboration, and/or foster the team’s ability to implement the plan. Be sure that you are including at least one change theory and at least one leadership strategy in your explanation. Always remember to cite your sources; direct quotes require quotation marks and a page or paragraph number to be included in the citation.

Another way to approach your explanations in this section is to think through the following:

What is the theory or strategy?

How will it likely help an interdisciplinary team to collaborate, implement, and/or buy in to the project plan?

Make sure to frame this explanation within the organizational context of the proposed plan, that is, your interviewee’s organization.

Team Collaboration Strategy

In this section, begin by further defining the responsibilities and actions that represent the implementation of the plan. One strategy to defining this is to take a “who, what, where, and when” approach for each team member.

For example:

Project Manager A will apply the double-loop feedback model on one new product project for a single quarter.

Project Manager B will apply the double-loop feedback model on all new product projects for a quarter.

Vice President A will review the workloads of project managers using the double-loop feedback model every Thursday for one quarter.

After you have roughly outlined the roles and responsibilities of team members, you will explain one or more collaborative approaches that will enable the team to work efficiently to achieve the plan’s objective. As with the change theories and leadership strategies, you may draw on the research you conducted for the Interview and Interdisciplinary Issue Identification assessment. However, you are being asked to give a more in-depth explanation of the collaboration approaches and look at how they will help the theoretical interdisciplinary team in your plan proposal.

Another way to approach your explanations in this section is to think through the following:

What is the collaboration approach?

What types of collaboration and teamwork will best help the interdisciplinary team be successful?

How is the collaboration approach relevant to the team’s needs and will it help drive success?

Make sure to frame this explanation in terms of the subject of the plan proposal; that is, your interviewee’s organization.

Required Organizational Resources

For this section, you will be making rough estimates of the resources needed for your plan proposal to be successful. This section does not have to be exact but the estimates should be realistic for the chosen organization.

Items you should include or address in this section:

What are the staffing needs for your plan proposal?

What equipment or supplies are needed for your plan proposal?

Does the organization already have these?

If so, what is the cost associated with using these resources?

If not, what is the cost of acquiring these resources?

What access (to patients, departments, and so forth) is needed?

Are there any costs associated with these?

What is the overall financial budget request for the plan proposal?

Staff time, resource use, resource acquisition, and access charged?

Remember to include a specific dollar amount in your request.

After you have detailed your budget, make sure that you explain any impacts on organizational resources that could happen if your plan is not undertaken and successful. In other words, if the issue you are try to solve through your plan proposal persists or gets worse, what will be the potential costs to the organization?

References[supanova_question]

Instructions You’ll complete this assignment in several steps: 1. First, open the files you submitted in Units 7, 8, Essay

Instructions You’ll complete this assignment in several steps: 1. First, open the files you submitted in Units 7, 8, Essay

Questions: A Downward Spiral: A Case Study in Homelessness Discussion Questions: What events in John’s life created a “downward

Questions: A Downward Spiral: A Case Study in Homelessness Discussion Questions: What events in John’s life created a “downward. Questions: A Downward Spiral: A Case Study in Homelessness Discussion Questions: What events in John’s life created a “downward.

Questions: A Downward Spiral: A Case Study in Homelessness
Discussion Questions:
What events in John’s life created a “downward spiral” into homelessness? Which events related to social needs, and which could health care have addressed?

What were some of the barriers John faced in accessing health care?

Why do you think the emergency department was the first place John thought to go for care? How might the emergency department improve care for patients like John?

Why do you think John wouldn’t make eye contact with the HCH team at first? How would you build a trusting relationship with a person like John?
What aspects of the HCH care do you think represent high-quality care for the homeless? How do you think Maggie made John feel like he was a “real person?”
In your own experience, have you encountered a homeless individual? What was that like? Do you recall what you were thinking?
​​Discussion Questions:
What events in John’s life created a “downward spiral” into homelessness? Which events related to social needs, and which could health care have addressed?
What were some of the barriers John faced in accessing health care?
Why do you think the emergency department was the first place John thought to go for care? How might the emergency department improve care for patients like John?
Why do you think John wouldn’t make eye contact with the HCH team at first? How would you build a trusting relationship with a person like John?
What aspects of the HCH care do you think represent high-quality care for the homeless? How do you think Maggie made John feel like he was a “real person?”
In your own experience, have you encountered a homeless individual? What was that like? Do you recall what you were thinking?
[supanova_question]

College of Computing and Informatics Pg. 03 Question Three Assignment 2 Deadline:

College of Computing and Informatics

Pg. 03

Question Three

Assignment 2

Deadline: Day 5/12/2021 @ 23:59

[Total Mark for this Assignment is 5]

Assignment 2

Deadline: Day 5/12/2021 @ 23:59

[Total Mark for this Assignment is 5]

Business Computer Languages

IT401

Business Computer Languages

IT401

Instructions:

You must submit two separate copies (one Word file and one PDF file) using the Assignment Template on Blackboard via the allocated folder. These files must not be in compressed format.

It is your responsibility to check and make sure that you have uploaded both the correct files.

Zero mark will be given if you try to bypass the SafeAssign (e.g. misspell words, remove spaces between words, hide characters, use different character sets, convert text into image or languages other than English or any kind of manipulation).

Email submission will not be accepted.

You are advised to make your work clear and well-presented. This includes filling your information on the cover page.

You must use this template, failing which will result in zero mark.

You MUST show all your work, and text must not be converted into an image, unless specified otherwise by the question.

Late submission will result in ZERO mark.

The work should be your own, copying from students or other resources will result in ZERO mark.

Use Times New Roman font for all your answers.

Instructions:

You must submit two separate copies (one Word file and one PDF file) using the Assignment Template on Blackboard via the allocated folder. These files must not be in compressed format.

It is your responsibility to check and make sure that you have uploaded both the correct files.

Zero mark will be given if you try to bypass the SafeAssign (e.g. misspell words, remove spaces between words, hide characters, use different character sets, convert text into image or languages other than English or any kind of manipulation).

Email submission will not be accepted.

You are advised to make your work clear and well-presented. This includes filling your information on the cover page.

You must use this template, failing which will result in zero mark.

You MUST show all your work, and text must not be converted into an image, unless specified otherwise by the question.

Late submission will result in ZERO mark.

The work should be your own, copying from students or other resources will result in ZERO mark.

Use Times New Roman font for all your answers.

Student Details:

Name: ###

CRN: ###

ID: ###

Student Details:

Name: ###

CRN: ###

ID: ###

1.5 Marks

1.5 Marks

Learning Outcome(s):

Develop a program based on specification using programming language elements including syntax, data types, conditional statement, control structures, procedures, arrays, objects and classes

Learning Outcome(s):

Develop a program based on specification using programming language elements including syntax, data types, conditional statement, control structures, procedures, arrays, objects and classes

Question One

Write a java program that:

Create an abstract class named Shape that contains three integers length, breadth, radius and an empty method named printArea().

Provide three classes named Rectangle, Triangle and Circle such that each one of the classes extends the class Shape.

Each one of the classes contains only the method printArea() that read the requested values and prints the area of the given shape.

Provide a class Main that create a rectangle, a triangle and a cercle then print their respective areas.

Note: you should Include the screenshot of the program output as a part of your answer. Otherwise, zero marks will be awarded.

2 Marks

2 Marks

Learning Outcome(s):

Develop a program based on specification using programming language elements including syntax, data types, conditional statement, control structures, procedures, arrays, objects and classes

Learning Outcome(s):

Develop a program based on specification using programming language elements including syntax, data types, conditional statement, control structures, procedures, arrays, objects and classes

Question Two

Create a class called Invoice that a hardware store might use to represent an invoice for an item sold at the store.

An Invoice should include four information as instance variables: a part number (type String), a part description (type String), a quantity of the item being purchased (type int) and a price per item (double).

Your class should have a constructor that initializes the four instance variables. Provide a set and a get method for each instance variable.

In addition, provide a method named getInvoiceAmount that calculates the invoice amount (i.e., multiplies the quantity by the price per item), then returns the amount as a double value. If the quantity is not positive, it should be set to 0. If the price per item is not positive, it should be set to 0.0.

Write a tester class named InvoiceTest that demonstrates class Invoice’s capabilities by creating two invoices then changing and printing their characteristics.

Note: you should Include the screenshot of the program output as a part of your answer. Otherwise, zero marks will be awarded.

1.5 Marks

1.5 Marks

Learning Outcome(s):

Explain the basic principles of programming, concept of language, and universal constructs of programming languages.

Develop a program based on specification using programming language elements including syntax, data types, conditional statement, control structures, procedures, arrays, objects and

Learning Outcome(s):

Explain the basic principles of programming, concept of language, and universal constructs of programming languages.

Develop a program based on specification using programming language elements including syntax, data types, conditional statement, control structures, procedures, arrays, objects and

Question Three

Write a complete Java program that do the following:

Read your student’s ID number, store it in an array named myStudentNO and print it.

find the number of even and odd integers in myStudentNO array

Note: Your program output should look as shown below

Note: you should Include the screenshot of the program output as a part of your answer and you should enter your student id number. Otherwise zero marks will be awarded.[supanova_question]

Questions: A Downward Spiral: A Case Study in Homelessness Discussion Questions: What events in John’s life created a “downward

Questions: A Downward Spiral: A Case Study in Homelessness Discussion Questions: What events in John’s life created a “downward

Consider the case scenario you described in week six and assume the change process is proceeding in an effective

Consider the case scenario you described in week six and assume the change process is proceeding in an effective. Consider the case scenario you described in week six and assume the change process is proceeding in an effective.

Consider the case scenario you described in week six and assume the change process is proceeding in an effective manner. Address the following:

Provide a concise introduction for your posting.
Identify the key stakeholders who are impacted by the change at each of the micro-, meso-, and macro-levels, and discuss how you will engage those stakeholders in the change process.
Describe one supportive factor within the system which will facilitate your recommended change and an example of one barrier that may occur which would impede your recommended change.
Provide at least one leadership strategy to address or resolve the barrier; include your rationale.
Recommend one leadership strategy to sustain the change within the context of a complex system and explain your rationale.
Conclude with a succinct synopsis of key points and concise self-reflection of how this topic contributes to your growth as a future leader in the chosen specialty track.

This is the topic::::: (PLEASE SEE ATTATCHED DOCUMENT FOR AN EXAMPLE AND GUIDE)
Week 6 ::Decreased nursing staff in the department of medical specialities which has resulted in decreased patient satisfaction.[supanova_question]

Module 13: ECN500: Exchange Rate Systems and Currency Crises

Discuss the causes of the recent currency crisis in Turkey. What are the implications for the Turkish economy and the global economy? What should be the role of the Turkish Central Bank for stable currency?
Incorporate data/graphs/tables to help make your points.
Answering the instructor question reply after posting the discussion is required.
Embed course material concepts, principles, and theories, which require supporting citations along with at least one scholarly, peer-reviewed reference in supporting your answer unless the discussion calls for more. Keep in mind that these scholarly references can be found in the Saudi Digital Library by conducting an advanced search specific to scholarly references.
Use APA 7th edition and Saudi Electronic University academic writing standards.
You are required to reply to at least two peer discussion question post answers to this weekly discussion question and/or your instructor’s response to your posting. These post replies need to be substantial and constructive in nature. They should add to the content of the post and evaluate/analyze that post answer. Normal course dialogue doesn’t fulfill these two peer replies but is expected throughout the course. Answering all course questions is also required.
[supanova_question]

E-xactly how big are we talking about? Directions: Match up each statement

Consider the case scenario you described in week six and assume the change process is proceeding in an effective E-xactly how big are we talking about?

Directions: Match up each statement with its corresponding value written in scientific notation…or a calculator/spreadsheet way of writing scientific notation.

Statement

Number

Box office of the movie Avatar, in dollars

1) 4.35E2

The student population of Belmont University as of Fall 2020, in number of people

2) 8.44E3

Median selling price of a home in Franklin, Tennessee, as of July 2021, in dollars

3) 1.75E4

The average annual value of Nashville Predators captain Roman Josi’s 2021 salary, in dollars

4) 7.25E5

Number of United States House of Representatives, in number of people

5) 9.059E6

Capacity of Hollywood Bowl Amphitheater, in number of people

6) 1.1E7

The population of the United States in 2021, in number of people

7) 3.31E8

Number of sold copies of Dangerously in Love, Beyonce’s most commercially successful album, in number of records from 2003 to 2020

8) 2.802E9[supanova_question]

Failure of Democracy and the Rise of Totalitarianism Textbook: Chapter 4, 5

Failure of Democracy and the Rise of Totalitarianism

Textbook: Chapter 4, 5

Lesson

Minimum of 1 scholarly source (in addition to the textbook)

Initial Post Instructions
During the 1930s, much of the world seemed to give up on their hope for a democratic solution to their problems and instead turned to totalitarianism, both in Europe and in Asia.

Germany/Hitler

Address the following questions for your selection:

What effects did the history, politics, and economies of those areas play in their decisions to turn to totalitarianism?

What role did the Great Depression in the United States play in their plight?

In our previous weeks we have touched on the rise of fascism as a political ideology and this week we will see the ways in which the Nazi’s incorporated that doctrine to fit their political goals. Additionally, we covered how communism and imperialism continued to dominate political thinking and diplomatic maneuvers. These ideas became increasingly relevant during the 1920s and 1930s as the Great Depression set in and voters and constituents around the world became desperate for political answers. As we examine these years in global history, think about what would have appealed to the Germans about the message the Nazi’s were promoting and why such a virulent anti-semitism found a home in German politics. Why would the Japanese have supported a war against a western power like the United States? Finally, feel free to discuss other instances in history or in contemporary times where political and/or economic desperation has caused people and societies to embrace policies or doctrines that they might have otherwise rejected in other eras.[supanova_question]

Answer the question after reading the case

Answer the following questions after reading the case:
1. Why is Clarkson Lumber so short of cash despite its record of profitable operations?
2. Evaluate Mr. Clarkson’s estimates of his loan requirements. What size loan does he need and when can he repay it?
3. Is it smart to continue to expand the business even though it is putting extensive financial pressure on management?
Submit answers and any spreadsheets you create to support answers.

done
Seen
3 mins ago[supanova_question]

Anthropology Question

As a final reflection, please craft a four to five page essay (double spaced, 1-inch margins) describing the most relevant, interesting, or surprising information you learned about the “Human Odyssey.” In the final paragraph or two, please reflect on why you do or do not believe studying the past is relevant for today and into the future. I realize this might seem to be a loaded question and that I am seeking an answer. I am not! Please be honest. You will be graded on your integration of class information and the quality of your essay — not your opinion! If you use outside materials for your essay, please include a references page. If all your materials are from class, this is not necessary.
Here Are some links to the topics we had discussed in class, so you can have an idea about the topic we had discussed in class.
– Module 9: The New World: One if by Land, Two if by Sea
https://mediasite.sdsu.edu/Mediasite/Play/4615b838…
– Module 10: Colonizing the Vast Pacific
https://mediasite.sdsu.edu/Mediasite/Play/d4d7b0cb…
– Module 11: Rise of Cultural Complexity: A California Case Study
https://mediasite.sdsu.edu/Mediasite/Play/4624d829…
– Module 12: The Agricultural “Revolution”
https://sdsu.zoom.us/rec/play/_eMgOiyme6PxNokG8ts2…
– Module 13: The Near East: From Hunter Gatherers to Agriculturalists
https://mediasite.sdsu.edu/Mediasite/Play/07fa946b…
– Module 14: Consequences of Complexity
https://mediasite.sdsu.edu/Mediasite/Play/923bfe6d…
– Module 15: Colonial Encounters: The European Radiation
https://mediasite.sdsu.edu/Mediasite/Play/b9d721b9…
– Module 16: Fantastic Trash: The Realities of Living in the Material World
https://mediasite.sdsu.edu/Mediasite/Play/b10077fc…

done
Seen
6 mins ago[supanova_question]

Harper Adams University Assignment Brief (Online Submission Only) Module Name: Supply Chain

Harper Adams University

Assignment Brief (Online Submission Only)

Module Name: Supply Chain Management

Module Code: F6014

Module Tutor: Jane Eastham

Assignment Title: The evaluation of supply chain strategy

Submission Deadline:

3pm on Wednesday, 4th of August 2021

NOTE: Please ensure your student number is included at the beginning of your submission title when uploading your work. Do not include your name in the document.

Word Limit: 3,500 max.

Time Guide: 35hs

File Size Limit: 20 MB

File Type: MS Word

Module Outcomes Assessed:

1.Analyse the complexity of global supply networks, drawing on supply chain management theories, research literature and best industry practice.

2. Examine and evaluate supply chain strategies and the impact on performance with consideration of the value stream effectiveness, efficiency, as well as ethical, environmental issues, and risk factors.

3. Assess strategies for developing and managing supply chain relationships.

4. Evaluate the value stream analysis with a view to improving supply chain performance.

Task: essay

The assignment allows you to draw from research and knowledge of a supply chain of your choice. This may be a national, international or global supply chain

Using Lean theory and one other theory of your choice examine, evaluate and critique a chosen supply chain. Your essay should make recommendations for restructuring and improving the supply chain performance.

Your theoretical options may include Agile, Leagile, supply chain risk management theory, power dependency theories, supply chain management theories and theories of trust or others of your own choosing.

Presentation requirements:

The work will be judged against the extent to which it fulfils the following criteria:

Criteria

Weighting %

Research into a specific supply chain or product

25%

A critique of the current practices, based on your analysis

25%

Critical evaluation of identified supply chain theories and strategies

25%

Citations and Reference

12%

Presentation

13%

Please ensure that:

The work meets the criteria given in below.

The work is able to communicate an informed, mature and thoughtful understanding of the topics under consideration.

Calibri or Arial font size 11; All page margins = 2 cm

The work is able to demonstrate an appropriate level of background reading and research in relation to the topics under consideration.

[Note: Good work will be expected to utilise at least 20 reference sources and no more than 25% of reference sources should be websites. PDF publications carried on websites will not be classed as websites. The excessive use of websites will incur a penalty established by the judgment of the marker.]

The work gives complete, planned, synthetic and coherent responses to the assignment tasks.

The work complies with the stated word limits.

Conforms to relevant presentation guidelines as detailed in Harper Adams’ Guide to Essay Writing and Guide to Referencing available through the library intranet homepage.

Plagiarism and/or poor academic practice will incur of marks being deducted and are subject to the university disciplinary guidelines.

70 – 100%

60 – 69%

50 – 59%

40 – 49%

35 – 39%

0 – 34%

Research into a specific supply chain or product

25%

The work draws upon a range of sources of data on their chosen chain. It offers a precise, clear and autonomous interpretation of the value chain

Demonstrates thorough research skills and gathers a clear outline of issues facing the supply chain.

Demonstrates research skills and gathers sufficient data to show the many of the issues facing the supply chain.

Demonstrates some if limited research skills and gathers data to show some of the issues facing the supply chain.

Demonstrates limited or no research skills and gathers insufficient data to show the many of the issues facing within the supply chain –

A poor piece of research that shows no understanding of SC and insufficient research skills

a critique of the current practices, based on your analysis

(25%)

Clear evidence that the student has drawn upon appropriate theoretical concepts and deployed these to provide an independent synthesis of ideas

Some evidence that the student has drawn upon appropriate theoretical concepts and deployed these to provide an independent synthesis of ideas

Evidence that there has been some application of appropriate theories to assess competitive advantage

Tendency towards either description of theory or practice

Limited evidence that of application of appropriate theories to assess competitive advantage

A strong tendency towards either description of theory or practice

Student has failed to explicitly appropriate theories to assess competitive advantage

Work is highly descriptive

Student has failed to understand the nature of this section of the assignment

Critical evaluation of identified supply chain theories and strategies

(25%)

A clear thoughtful analysis and argument drawing upon readings

A thoughtful analysis and argument drawing upon readings

Some evidence of thought and analysis and argument drawing upon readings

Some evidence of thought but has failed to consider the implications of the theory on their observations

The student has made little attempt to consider theoretical perspectives

The student has made no attempt to consider theoretical perspectives

Citations and Reference (12%)

Strong evidence of rigorous and holistic reading programme – research- evidences through citations and references delivered according to HAU requirements, references made to an extensive range of sources of data including academic journal articles

Evidence of rigorous and holistic reading/ research, citations and references delivered according to HAU requirements, references made to a wide range of sources of data including academic journal article

Some evidence of some good and thoughtful research, citations and references delivered according to HAU requirements, references made to a good range of sources of data including academic journal article

Some evidence of research citations and references delivered according to HAU requirements, references made to a good range of sources of data including academic journal article

Limited evidence of research

little or no evidence of research

Presentation (13%)

Well organised and professionally presented, arguments are coherent and offer a cogent and convincing argument

A professionally presented piece of work that articulates a coherent message with a real attempt to present a structured argument

A good attempt to present a professional piece of work – the work has a tendency towards the descriptive

A descriptive piece of work – greater articulation of ideas would raise the mark

Highly descriptive

The student has failed to understand the requirements

Date of assignment launch to students: 12th July 2021

Feedback and grades will be returned by: September 2021

Assignment brief moderated by (print name):

Signed: Alastair Boot Date: 25/6/21

Assignment submission

Submission declaration: In submitting this assignment I/we acknowledge that I/we understand the definition of, and penalties for, cheating, collusion and plagiarism set out in the assessment regulations. I/we also confirm that this work has not previously been submitted for assessment for an academic award, unless otherwise indicated.

Assignment Submission Checklist …. Have you….?

Uploaded the digital copy of the assignment to The Learning Hub?

Received your e-mail receipt to confirm successful assignment upload to The Learning Hub?

Checked that the uploaded digital copy is the correct file?

Retained a digital back-up of the assignment in case of file corruption or other difficulties?

You should be aware that…

Work submitted after the deadline will be subject to a mark penalty.

Submitted work that does not use the specified file format may not be marked if the file cannot be accessed.

Failure to upload or uploading the digital copy after the deadline will result in a mark penalty.

If you do not receive a receipt within 30 minutes of uploading your work, please contact the Assignment Office (01952 815058 or assignments@harper-adams.ac.uk).

Digital files must be retained for the duration of your studies.

Penalties: Work submitted after the published deadline will be subject to a mark penalty (unless there are approved, documented, mitigating circumstances). The penalties for late or non-submission are outlined in Annex 5.01 of the Academic Quality Assurance Manual. Student work submitted UP TO 5 working days later than the published date/time will be subject to the final mark being capped at 40%. Student work submitted AFTER 3.00pm on the fifth working day will be awarded a grade of zero. After uploading your digital copy, please retain the emailed receipt(s) which you should receive confirming that your assignment has been successfully uploaded.

For group assignments, on time submission is the collective responsibility of the group. If a group assignment is submitted after the published deadline, ALL members of the group will be subject to the penalty shown above. All group members should ensure that they have a plan, agreed in advance, in the event that a nominated individual is unable to complete the submission by the stated deadline.

Wordcount: Students are expected to keep within the specified word / page limit and include a word count or page numbering as applicable. The portion of an assignment that exceeds a word / page limit will not be marked.

Assignment return

Your feedback will be returned through GradeMark. To view feedback, please return to the drop-in box on your module. Instructions on how to access feedback through GradeMark can be found under the “Student Information” tab on the front page of The Learning Hub. As well as the grade/mark, you should also receive feedback (which may be typed or spoken) on your assignment. If the written feedback provided is unclear you may request (via the Assignment Office) for the module leader/module tutor to provide clarification.

Your marked assignment should be returned by the date stated on the brief. If this will not be possible, the module leader/module tutor will advise students of the expected return date. If you do not receive your mark/feedback by this date, please ask your Course Representative, on behalf of the cohort, to e-mail latereturn@harper-adams.ac.uk to enable this matter to be investigated.

Course Representatives – If you are requested to report late feedback by your cohort, please include the following information in the e-mail: Course name, Module Title, Module Code, Assignment Title and the stated feedback/grade return date. In reporting an issue, you may, if wish to do so, request that your details are kept anonymous. However, please be aware that this will mean that the University will not be able to provide you with direct feedback/updates on the investigation process.

Harper Adams University, Academic Quality Assurance Manual Annex 5.03b

Approved: Learning, Teaching and Student Experience Committee, (Revised: September 2020) Page 2 of 6[supanova_question]

FA3 Investigation – argumentative essay Suggested structure Introduction outlines the aims, establishes

FA3 Investigation – argumentative essay

Suggested structure

Introduction outlines the aims, establishes the topic’s importance and states the point being argued

Main body consists of main ideas developed in clear paragraphs to present an informed argument eg

Identification of essential legal features of negligence in the scenario (Comprehending) eg

Relevant legislation

Elements of negligence

Identification of plaintiff and defendant

Relevant defence/s

Description of legal concepts, principles and/or processes of Queensland negligence laws that relate to the scenario (Comprehending)

Relevant defence/s

Application of legal concepts, principles and/or processes to determine the nature and scope of the negligence in the scenario (Analysing)

Interpret legal information to examine different viewpoints and their consequences (Analysing)

Use case examples to support analysis

Legal alternatives presented (Analysing)

Recommendation/s proposed and justified (Evaluating)

Case law could be referred to here to support justification

Implications of the recommendation/s discussed (Evaluating)

Conclusion to summarise the main finding from the analysis and evaluation

Additional information:

In-text citations must be used (Selecting)

Reference list must be included (Selecting)

Expression, logical development of ideas, accurate use of legal terminology, spelling, grammar and punctuation will be assessed (Creating a response)

Essay must be within the 1500-2000 word limit.[supanova_question]

FACILITY PLANNING – FLOOR PLAN PART 2 4 Running head: Facility Planning

FACILITY PLANNING – FLOOR PLAN PART 2 4

Running head: Facility Planning – Floor Plan part 2 1

Facility Planning – Floor Plan part 2

Latoya Chambers

HCS/446

Johnnie West

August 2, 2021

The provision of medical service is an essential and sensitive sector, and it requires to be regulated by the federal government and state policy. The governing institutions have legal thresholds that any institution needs to meet before it can start to run. The guidelines are designed to ensure the safety of all people who use the facility. One of the essential equipment required in a medical facility is fire extinguisher cylinders (WHO, 2021). The cylinders are necessary to contain a fire if it erupts, and they should be installed so that it would be accessible to everyone at any point in the building. Besides, we should install another close to where a large group of people is likely to congregate. Therefore, in my hospital plan, we will install two fire extinguisher cylinders on the wall of the waiting lounge and another on the wall of the nurse station. In mitigating a fire incidence, we require an exit to allow people in the facility to escape to safety when a fire erupts. We will install an emergency exit between the storage room and the adjacent exam room. Additionally, we shall fix a written instruction that contains the procedure a person follows in case a fire starts on all walls of the facility.

Other pieces of equipment that need to be installed are the chairs in the waiting lounge and the nurse station. It is a legal requirement that patients should be comfortable whenever they are waiting for service. Also, the chairs should be installed to ensure that the patients are served orderly, and no patient is preferred to others. We will install the seats along the length of the waiting lounge. This arrangement ensures equity in the facility. The doors installed should have hinges enabling them to open in both directions. The doors will ensure that a patient being pushed on a wheelchair or being bed-ridden moves smoothly.

Moreover, we will increase the size of the reception to accommodate a nurse who will carry out tests of significant vital signs of patients who walk in, such as body temperature and blood pressure. The tests are essential in medical practice to determine that the patient who has walked in can wait in the queue until their turn to be attended to has come. It is immoral to subject someone incapable of waiting to the queue and risk the patient succumbing. We will avail the nurse who checks for these signs with essential equipment; including a sphygmomanometer used to measure the blood’s pressure, a thermometer to test the body temperature, a BMI machine that measures the Body Mass Index (BMI), and a Cardiac Finger Pulse Rate Meter to measure the heart’s beating rate. The vitals measured is enough to make a general judgment of the severity of the patient’s illness.

The changes proposed in this stage have both cost implications and human resource requirement. The organization needs to use the money to purchase the equipment, including clinical thermometers, a sphygmomanometer, a BMI machine, a cardiac finger pulse rate meter, seats, fire extinguishers, and the required type of doors (Griffin, 2021). Moreover, it requires one more nurse to be employed to undertake the vitals test, which increases the amount of money paid to workers as salary. Additionally, a restructure of the design to avail space at the reception and allow access to the emergency exit has cost accompanied. It is easy to monitor the people working at the facility because the layout enables one to access the activities at every station from a central position. The layout thus guarantees transparency among the workers and also accountability.

The legal considerations made in the medical facility interlinks with the ethical practices one would consider implementing in a healthcare facility. The need for a fire extinguishing strategy is a legal requirement and is ethically essential. On the other hand, the need to confirm that a patient can wait for services is ethical. Legally, it is required that all patients should be treated equally. However, if the vital signs indicate that a patient would die in the queue, it would require ethical intervention to skip the line and save the patient first. In summary, the legal requirements in the planning of a medical facility streamline the service provision and align the practices of a healthcare facility with the law.

References

Griffin, Charles. “Planning, Design And Construction Of Health Care Facilities”. Jointcommissioninternational.Org, 2021, https://www.jointcommissioninternational.org/-/media/jci/jci-documents/offerings/advisory-services/industry-services-program/ebpdc15sample.pdf?db=web&hash=5A79570EBAAEDFE3A2E8D408DEF5672D&hash=5A79570EBAAEDFE3A2E8D408DEF5672D.

“Patient Safety”. Who.Int, 2021, https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/patient-safety.[supanova_question]

Dr Nauman Shad HOME CONTACT BLOGS Factors Affecting Difficulty & Discrimination Indices

Dr Nauman Shad

HOME

CONTACT

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Factors Affecting Difficulty & Discrimination Indices

Posted on September 19, 2016 by Dr Nauman Shad

Factors Affecting Difficulty & Discrimination Indices

Often teachers are stunned after seeing results of an assessment as to how could students have performed so poorly in an examination.

Making fair and systematic evaluations of students’ performance can be a challenging task. Teachers, employers, and others in evaluative positions use a variety of tools to assist them in their evaluations. Tests are tools that are frequently used to facilitate the evaluation process

One-best MCQs are one of the strategies of the assessment tool that quickly assess any level of cognition. Analysis of these MCQs should be done on and off evaluate the quality of items and of the test as a whole. Such analyses can also be employed to revise and improve both items and the test.

Item/MCQ analysis is a valuable, yet relatively simple, procedure performed after the examination that provides information regarding the reliability and validity of a test item. It also tells how difficult or easy the questions were, e.g. through the difficulty index.

Difficulty Index

This is an index which expresses the proportion or percentage of students who answered the item/MCQ correctly. It is frequently called the p-value.

The larger the percentage getting an item right, the easier the item & the higher the difficulty index. This is why perhaps “difficulty index” should have been named “easiness index”.

The item/MCQ difficulty index is one of the most useful, and most frequently reported, item analyses in statistics.

Item difficulty can range from 0.0 (none of the students answered the item correctly) to 1.0 (all of the students answered the item correctly). Experts recommend that the average level of difficulty for an MCQ item should be between 30% and 70%.

Factors Causing a Low Difficulty Index (A low p-value)

Difficulty index of less than 20-25% means there is obviously something wrong. Following are a list of factors that may cause a low difficulty index (also called p-value) of a MCQ (less than 02.-0.3, i.e. less than 20-30% of students got the MCQ right):

Learning objective of MCQ is out of course/not in prescribed/recommended textbooks

Content/Learning objective was not taught in class

Question was really difficult-beyond their scope of understanding of an undergraduate student

MCQ was of a higher cognitive level

Question and or its wording is not clear enough; ambiguous question; wrongly phrased

Distracters not clear enough; may be more than one ‘most likely’ answer

Answer in examiners key is wrong or there are two correct answers; these are often picked up when even toppers get the MCQ item wrong.

Students missed the concerned lecture (physically absent), did not take relevant notes, were mentally absent in the lecture etc.

Students did not study from recommended textbooks, lecture notes etc. Students often study from short books which do not cover all learning objectives

Students in general did not come prepared for the exam

Students caliber in general is weak (e.g. Students of a private Medical College in general compared with students of a Government Medical College)

Syllabus too extensive and students were unable to cover/revise the whole prescribed course

Students overburdened with more than one tests/evaluations in one day

Carefree, casual attitude of students, especially of wealthy parents and/or those who were not even interested in the course and were forced/coerced/Requested by parents to get admission (e.g. in a medical college); also includes female medical students and/or their parents who only wish to add ‘dr.’ as part of the ‘Jahaiz’.

Leaving it too late: Many students leave it too late before starting to seriously study for the exams especially professional exams. They ‘enjoy’ all the year round and only start serious study in the last 1-2 weeks/months before final exams

Incompetent teacher: Teacher was unable to deliver the learning objectives wholly and properly:

Teaching – The Once Noble Profession

17. Inability to use unfair means; no leakage of paper etc (unofficial reasons)

These same factors may also be reasons why a SEQ (Short Essay Question) was found to have a low difficulty index with following additions:

18. Excessive strictness in paper checking

19. Wrong/negligent paper checking. Right answers inadvertently marked wrong.

This may happen when an examiner has a huge bundle of papers (is given or taken the huge responsibility for maximum monetary benefits) to check in limited given time.

Or if the examiner is incompetent (not competent enough) to check the papers

Discrimination Index

There are other item analyses besides the difficulty index. For example the discrimination index; this index of discrimination is simply the difference between the percentage of high achieving students who got an item right and the percentage of low achieving students who got the item right.

In simpler terms, ability of an item to discriminate between the top and bottom students who took the exam determines the discrimination index.

The discrimination index is obtained by subtracting the number of students in the lower group who got the item correct (worst performance) (lower 25 %) from the number of students in the upper group who got the item correct (upper 25 %). Then divide by the number of students in each group.

The possible range of the discrimination index is -1.0 to 1.0; ideally the value should be 0.2 or higher. However, if an item has discrimination below 0.0, it suggests a problem.

When an item is discriminating negatively, overall the most knowledgeable students are getting the item wrong and the least knowledgeable students are getting the item right.

Causes of low/negative discrimination index

Poor/very low caliber set/subset of students

The item was so easy that it couldn’t discriminate correctly

The item was so difficult that it couldn’t discriminate correctly

A negative discrimination index may indicate that the item is measuring something other than what the rest of the test is measuring.

It may be a sign that the item has been mis-keyed (wrong key) or double keyed (two correct answers)

Too much use of unfair means in the exam, so much so that it couldn’t discriminate easily

Some of the factors mentioned above for difficulty index (e.g. item too ambiguous, wrongly phrased, beyond scope etc) as item discrimination is greatly influenced by item difficulty

It can be seen that all of these except for point 2 & 6 are causes of items having a low difficulty index as well as a low/negative discrimination index. It is to be noted that point number 1 is often the major reason for poor item analysis in private medical colleges in Pakistan, especially where admission in medical colleges on merit has not been taken into that much consideration.

Additional Points

Item analysis data are tentative. Such data are influenced by the type and number of students being tested, instructional procedures employed, and chance errors. Difficulty indices & discrimination indices should improve/change upon repeated/frequent assessment of subject knowledge.

If repeated use of items is possible, statistics should be recorded for each administration of each item.

(This article was published in Islam Medical & Dental College’s (Sialkot, Pakistan) first college magazine, with some additions brought here)[supanova_question]

Cyber Security Question

Week 10 Assignment – Develop Short- and Long-Term DSS-Based Strategies
Scenario
Imagine you’re the CIO of a large company (for example, a financial institution, a national fast-food franchise, a mobile phone service provider, or a large Internet-based company) that is experiencing a few industry changes (for example, fiscal or regulatory changes, new competition, new market forces, or changing technologies). Executive leaders want to completely understand your customers to improve revenue growth from existing customers and acquire new customers.Executive leaders believe that by understanding your customers’ demographics, spending patterns, credit scores, financial information, and so on, you can provide better customer service, market your products more effectively, create new products, and retain your customers.Many technologies, solutions, and processes exist that you can leverage to obtain this information. Many new technologies have emerged in recent years, such as cloud computing, SaaS, mobile BI, and Big Data.Executive leaders have asked you to develop short-term and long-term strategies for implementing a set of DSS, BA, and AI solutions to meet your goal of achieving a comprehensive view of your customers.Instructions
Fictitious assumptions and details may be assumed or created for the completion of this assignment. Application cases and examples in the textbook and elsewhere may be used to support your discussions and examples.Write a 4–5 page paper in which you:Explain, with examples, how your comprehensive view of customer data can solve three of your company’s business problems.
Develop, with justification, both a short- and a long-term strategy to meet your goal of achieving a comprehensive view of customer data.
Explain, with examples, how to use three implementation technologies to achieve the goals of your short- and long-term strategies.
Support your writing with at least three credible, relevant, and appropriate sources.Cite each source on your source list at least one time within your assignment.
For help with research, writing, and citation, access the library or review applicable library guides.

Write clearly and concisely in a manner that is well-organized, grammatically correct, and free of spelling, typographical, formatting, and punctuation errors.
This course requires the use of Strayer Writing Standards. For assistance and information, please refer to the Strayer Writing Standards link in the left-hand menu of your course. Check with your professor for any additional instructions.The specific course learning outcome associated with this assignment is:Evaluate the technologies, processes, and strategies needed to gather a comprehensive view of customer data. FOLLOW THE RUBRIC BELOW
Name: w10a1
Description: Develop Short- and Long-Term
DSS-Based Strategies

Grid View

List View

Unacceptable

Needs
Improvement

Satisfactory

Competent

Exemplary

Explain,
with examples, how a comprehensive view of customer data can solve three of a
company’s business problems.

Points:
0 (0.00%)
Did not identify how a comprehensive view of
customer data can solve three of a company’s business problems.

Points:
27.3 (18.20%)
Identified, but did not explain, how a
comprehensive view of customer data can solve three of a company’s business
problems.

Points:
31.5 (21.00%)
Explained, including examples, how a
comprehensive view of customer data can solve two of a company’s business
problems.

Points:
35.7 (23.80%)
Explained how a comprehensive view of
customer data can solve three of a company’s business problems.

Points:
42 (28.00%)
Explained, with examples, how a
comprehensive view of customer data can solve three of a company’s business
problems.

Develop,
with justification, both short- and long-term strategies to meet the goal of
achieving a comprehensive view of customer data.

Points:
0 (0.00%)
Did not outline both short- and long-term
strategies to meet the goal of achieving a comprehensive view of customer
data.

Points:
28.275 (18.85%)
Outlined, but did not fully develop, both
short- and long-term strategies to meet the goal of achieving a comprehensive
view of customer data.

Points:
32.625 (21.75%)
Developed a short- or long-term strategy
(but not both) to meet the goal of achieving a comprehensive view of customer
data.

Points:
36.975 (24.65%)
Developed both short- and long-term
strategies to meet the goal of achieving a comprehensive view of customer
data.

Points:
43.5 (29.00%)
Developed, with justification, both short-
and long-term strategies to meet the goal of achieving a comprehensive view
of customer data.

Explain,
with examples, how to use three implementation technologies to achieve the
goals of the short- and long-term strategies.

Points:
0 (0.00%)
Did not identify how to use three
implementation technologies total to achieve the goals of the short- and
long-term strategies.

Points:
27.3 (18.20%)
Identified, but did not explain, how to use
three implementation technologies to achieve the goals of the short- and
long-term strategies.

Points:
31.5 (21.00%)
Explained how to use three implementation
technologies to achieve the goals of the short- or long-term strategy (but
not both).

Points:
35.7 (23.80%)
Explained how to use three implementation
technologies to achieve the goals of the short- and long-term strategies.

Points:
42 (28.00%)
Explained, with examples, how to use three
implementation technologies to achieve the goals of the short- and long-term
strategies.

Support
one’s writing with at least three credible, relevant, and appropriate
sources.

Points:
0 (0.00%)
Did not cite any sources.

Points:
4.875 (3.25%)
Cited one source, which does not support
one’s writing.

Points:
5.625 (3.75%)
Supported one’s writing with one credible,
relevant, and appropriate source.

Points:
6.375 (4.25%)
Supported one’s writing with two credible,
relevant, and appropriate sources.

Points:
7.5 (5.00%)
Supported one’s writing with at least three
credible, relevant, and appropriate sources.

Write
clearly and concisely in a manner that is well-organized, grammatically
correct, and free of spelling, typographical, formatting, and punctuation
errors.

Points:
0 (0.00%)
Wrote in a manner that is incoherent and
grammatically incorrect, with numerous spelling, typographical, and
punctuation errors.

Points:
9.75 (6.50%)
Wrote in a manner that lacks clarity and
organization, with grammatical, spelling, typographical, formatting, and
punctuation errors that inhibit readability and effective communication.

Points:
11.25 (7.50%)
Wrote in a clear manner that is
grammatically correct but with spelling, typographical, formatting, and
punctuation errors that have no practical effect on readability and effective
communication.

Points:
12.75 (8.50%)
Wrote clearly and concisely in a manner that
is well-organized; grammatically correct; and nearly free of spelling,
typographical, formatting, and punctuation errors.

Points:
15 (10.00%)
Wrote clearly and concisely in a manner that
is well-organized; grammatically correct; and free of spelling,
typographical, formatting, and punctuation errors.

Name:w10a1

done
Seen
1 min ago[supanova_question]

Law Question

1. Identify your article https://www.washingtonpost.com/nation/2019/04/06/m…
2. Connect your article to the chapter and topic from the book.
3. Provide an overview/highlight of your article. Please be sure to explain why the information you are sharing with us is important. How can we use it as industry professionals? Why does your article matter? You don’t have to answer all the three of those questions per se, they basically mean the same thing–just wanted to give you different ways to interpret the expectation for number 3. You don’t have to read the question and then answer it–you can build it into your presentation. Just be sure you include this information somewhere in your presentation.
4. The maximum time allowed for your presentation is 3 minutes. I will cut you off 10 seconds after you reach 3 minutes and I will provide you two intermittent warnings. More will be explained during our exam. Don’t worry, you will know the 3 minutes is approaching~~plus you should be practicing too! If you exceed the maximum time, you will receive a penalty. As I said, you need to practice your presentation using a timer so you know how much time you need.
5. There is no minimum time; however, you need to address the three expectation identified above.
6. You are not expected to memorize your presentation. You may use notes–PLEASE DO NOT READ THEM! I recommend you use the written component (see more below) as a script for your presentation.
7. No visual aid required–you do not need a PPT or Prezi. If you feel the class would benefit from you using a PPT, I’m okay with you preparing one, I just want to be clear, it’s not required. You will need to provide me with your PPT in addition to your write up if you use a PPT. Please email me your PPT or the Prezi link before 6:00 p.m., 12/06/21 if you plan on using either type of file during your presentation. There is no time for technology issues, so if your visual aid does not work, you will be expected to present without it.
Written submission:
You will upload a written summary of your article into the current event final exam assignment, specifying which chapter and specific topic your article discusses. Your write up will connect your article to the chapter and topic. Your write up will also discuss why the information within the article is important–just like the requirements identified in the presentation instructions above. That is why I recommend you use your write up more like a script for your presentation.
[supanova_question]

Web Analytics

1) Personna ContentUsing the persona that you created in Week #5, it’s time to create content! Write three-four paragraphs that aligns fully with the persona details.For the sake of this exercise, assume that you are selling Google merchandise on the Google Merchandise store.If you’re finding it difficult to write for the persona you created, resist the urge to create a new one. In the real world, you get visitors you get. Consider this good practice and valuable workout for your creative muscles.
2) Certification Exam ConceptsSelect one certification mentioned in the textbook. Perform some research and describe the major concepts on the certification exam. Would you be interested in earning the certification? If so, what can you do to prepare for the exam?
Please share answers in 2 different docs.
[supanova_question]

Consider the case scenario you described in week six and assume the change process is proceeding in an effective

Consider the case scenario you described in week six and assume the change process is proceeding in an effective